Botnet

Online Museum Displays Decades of Malware (thestack.com) 36

An anonymous reader writes: archive.org has launched a Museum of Malware, which devotes itself to a historical look at DOS-based viruses of the 1980s and 1990s, and gives viewers the opportunity to run the viruses in a DOS game emulator, and to download 'neutered' versions of the code. With an estimated 50,000 DOS-based viruses in existence by the year 2000, the Malware Museum's 65 examples should be seen as representative of an annoying, but more innocent era of digital vandalism.
Botnet

ProxyBack Malware Turns Infected Computers into Internet Proxies (softpedia.com) 71

An anonymous reader writes: A new malware family called ProxyBack infects PCs and transforms them into a Web proxy. ProxyBack malware works by infecting a PC, establishing a connection with a proxy server controlled by the attackers, from where it receives instructions, and later the traffic it needs to route to actual Web servers. Each machine infected with ProxyBack works as a bot inside a larger network controlled by the attackers, who send commands and update instructions via simple HTTP requests. Some of the people infected with this malware, mysteriously found their IP listed on the buyproxy.ru Web proxy service.A technical write-up of the infection steps and various malware commands is available on the Palo Alto Networks blog.
Security

Pwnd Aethra Routers Used To Brute-Force WordPress Sites (voidsec.com) 27

An anonymous reader writes: Security researchers found around 8,000 Aethra routers (with no admin passwords) as part of a botnet that attacked WordPress sites, trying to brute-force admin accounts. Most routers were deployed in enterprise networks in Italy. Each device could have be used to launch DDoS attacks with a capability between 1 to 10 Gbps, based on the company's bandwidth. Things could be worse, though: Additional investigation also revealed that some of the routers were also susceptible to various reflected XSS and CSRF attacks that would also allow attackers to take control of the device, even if using different login credentials. Using Shodan, a search engine for locating Internet-connected devices, researchers found over 12,000 of Aethra routers around the world, 10,866 in Italy alone, and over 8,000 of these devices were of the model detected in the initial brute-force attack (Aethra Telecommunications PBX series). At that time, 70% of these Aethra routers were still using their default login credentials
Botnet

Microsoft, Law Enforcement Disrupt Dorkbot Botnet (technet.com) 31

An anonymous reader writes: Microsoft said in a blog post Thursday that it aided law enforcement agencies in several regions to disrupt a 4-year-old botnet called Dorkbot. The botnet aims to steal login credentials from services such as Gmail, Facebook, PayPal, Steam, eBay, Twitter and Netflix and has infected one million computers worldwide. The company didn't provide details on how Dorkbot's infrastructure was disrupted.
Bug

Zero-Day Bugs In Numerous Modems/Routers Could Compromise Millions of Users (softpedia.com) 81

An anonymous reader writes: Researchers have discovered a large number of zero-day flaws in 8 routers/modems from 4 manufacturers (ZTE, Huawei, Gemtek, Quanta) that would allow attackers to build a huge botnet by leveraging just a few exploits. Vulnerabilities include remote code execution, firmware rewrites, XSS, and CSRF. All these allow attackers to intercept both HTTP and HTTPS Web traffic, infect computers beyond the modem, intercept SMS messages, and detect the modem's geographical location. After six months, manufacturers have failed to fix the issues.
Android

Android App Mutates Source Code, Spreads Virally and Enables Mesh Networks (thestack.com) 74

An anonymous reader writes: Researchers from the Delft University of Technology have developed a self-replicating, mutating Android app which can create on-the-fly mesh networks in the event of an infrastructural disaster, or the enabling of internet kill switches by oppressive regimes. The app's source is available at GitHub, and the app itself requires no root privileges to propagate. It can self-compile while it mutates — for example, from a game to a calculator — in transit from one Android device to another, and compatibility with iOS and Windows phones is anticipated.
Linux

Botnet Takes Over Twitch Install and Partially Installs Gentoo 101

WarJolt writes: The plug was pulled on the attempt to crowd-source an Arch Linux install after a botnet threatened to take over the process. Twitch Installs has been rebooted by the twitchintheshell community and Twitch Installs users managed to reinstall Arch only to be thwarted by the botnet. The botnet managed to partially install Gentoo. Users are currently in the process of reinstalling Arch.
Botnet

Despite Takedown, the Dridex Botnet Is Running Again (sans.edu) 57

itwbennett writes: Brad Duncan, a security researcher with Rackspace, on Friday wrote on the Internet Storm Center blog that 'the Dridex botnet administrator was arrested on 2015-08-28, and Palo Alto Networks reported Dridex was back by 2015-10-01. That represents an outage of approximately one month.' The lesson here, writes Jeremy Kirk in an article on CSOonline is that 'while law enforcement can claim temporary victories in fighting cybercriminal networks, it's sometimes difficult to completely shut down their operations.'
Botnet

Compromised CCTV and NAS Devices Found Participating In DDoS Attacks (incapsula.com) 64

chicksdaddy writes: The parade of horribles continues on the Internet of Things, with a report from the security firm Incapsula that its researchers discovered compromised closed circuit cameras as well as home network attached storage (NAS) devices participating in denial of service attacks. The compromised machines included a CCTV at a local mall, just a couple minutes from the Incapsula headquarters.

According to the report, Incapsula discovered the infections as part of an investigation into a distributed denial of service attack on what it described as a "rarely-used asset" at a "large cloud service." The attack used a network of 900 compromised cameras to create a flood of HTTP GET requests, at a rate of around 20,000 requests per second, to try to disable the cloud-based server. The cameras were running the same operating system: embedded Linux with BusyBox, which is a collection of Unix utilities designed for resource-constrained endpoints.

The malware in question was a variant of a self-replicating program known as Lightaidra, which targets systems running BusyBox and exploits vulnerable Telnet/SSH services using so-called "brute force dictionary attacks" (aka "password guessing"). Given that many Internet connected devices simply use the default administrator credentials when deployed, calling it a "brute force" attack is probably a stretch.

Crime

FBI and Join UK Against Forces Against Spread of Dridex Banking Malware (nationalcrimeagency.gov.uk) 70

An anonymous reader writes: The UK's National Crime Agency (NCA) has issued a warning to UK online banking consumers to guard against the possibility of having been infected by the Dridex malware, which spreads via macros in infected Microsoft documents and is currently estimated to have cost £20mn to UK consumers. The NCA says that it is working with the FBI and several European authorities in a concerted campaign to take down the botnet behind the current crop of infections. Dridex is a derivative of the Cridex strain of banking malware, which itself stole many techniques from the GameOver Zeus malware package.
Security

Cyberattacks: Do Motives and Attribution Matter? 44

An anonymous reader writes: Whenever people think of APTs and targeted attacks, they ask: who did it? What did they want? While those questions may well be of some interest, a potentially more useful question to ask is: what information about the attacker can help organizations protect themselves better? Let's look at things from the perspective of a network administrator trying to defend an organization. If someone wants to determine who was behind an attack, maybe the first thing they'll do is use IP address locations to try and determine the location of an attacker. However, say an attack was traced to a web server in Korea. What's not to say that whoever was responsible for the attack also compromised that server? What makes you think that site's owner will cooperate with your investigation?
Crime

Citadel Botnet Operator Gets 4.5 Years In Prison 42

An anonymous reader writes: The U.S. Department of Justice has announced that Dimitry Belorossov, a.k.a. Rainerfox, an operator of the "Citadel" malware, has been sentenced to 4.5 years in prison following a guilty plea. Citadel was a banking trojan capable of stealing financial information. Belorossov and others distributed it through spam emails and malvertising schemes. He operated a 7,000-strong botnet with the malware, and also collaborated to improve it. The U.S. government estimates Citadel was responsible for $500 million in losses worldwide. Belorossov will have to pay over $320,000 in restitution.
Security

Imgur Exploited To Channel Botnet Attacks At 4chan 73

An anonymous reader writes: Imgur has been compromised by attackers looking for an opportunity to direct large volumes of traffic to 4chan. A Reddit thread explains that "when an Imgur image is loaded from /r/4chan [...] imgur loads a bunch of images from 8chan, which causes a DDoS to those sites." Meaning that if a user clicks an Imgur link on /r/4chan, it automatically makes around "500 requests" for one image from imageboard 4chan.org/8chan.
Spam

Ask Slashdot: Should I Publish My Collection of Email Spamming IP Addresses? 106

An anonymous reader writes: I have, for a while now, been collecting IP addresses from which email spam has been sent to, or attempted to be relayed through, my email server. I was wondering if I should publish them, so that others can adopt whatever steps are necessary to protect their email servers from that vermin. However, I am facing ethical issues here. What if the addresses are simply spoofed, and therefore branding them as spamming addresses might cause harm to innocent parties? What if, after having been co-opted by spammers, they are now used legitimately? I wonder if there's a market for all the thousands of webmail addresses that send Slashdot nothing but spam.
Security

Most Healthcare Managers Admit Their IT Systems Have Been Compromised 122

Lucas123 writes: Eighty-one percent of healthcare IT managers say their organizations have been compromised by at least one malware, botnet or other kind of cyber attack during the past two years, and only half of those managers feel that they are adequately prepared to prevent future attacks, according to a new survey by KPMG. The KPMG survey polled 223 CIOs, CTOs, chief security officers and chief compliance officers at healthcare providers and health plans, and found 65% indicated malware was most frequently reported line of attack during the past 12 to 24 months. Additionally, those surveyed indicated the areas with the greatest vulnerabilities within their organization include external attackers (65%), sharing data with third parties (48%), employee breaches (35%), wireless computing (35%) and inadequate firewalls (27%). Top among reasons healthcare facilities are facing increased risk, was the adoption of digital patient records and the automation of clinical systems.
IBM

IBM Tells Administrators To Block Tor On Security Grounds 70

Mickeycaskill writes: IBM says Tor is increasingly being used to scan organizations for flaws and launch DDoS, ransomware and other attacks. Tor, which provides anonymity by obscuring the real point of origin of Internet communications, was in part created by the US government, which helps fund its ongoing development, due to the fact that some of its operations rely on the network. However, the network is also widely used for criminal purposes. A report by the IBM says administrators should block access to Tor , noting a "steady increase" an attacks originating from Tor exit nodes, with attackers increasingly using Tor to disguise botnet traffic. "Spikes in Tor traffic can be directly tied to the activities of malicious botnets that either reside within the Tor network or use the Tor network as transport for their traffic," said IBM. "Allowing access between corporate networks and stealth networks can open the corporation to the risk of theft or compromise, and to legal liability in some cases and jurisdictions."
Security

WordPress Hacks Behind Surging Neutrino EK Traffic 51

msm1267 writes: More than 2,000 websites running WordPress have been compromised and are responsible for a surge this week in traffic from the Neutrino Exploit Kit. Attacks against sites running older versions of the content management system, 4.2 and earlier, were spotted by Zscaler. Those sites are backdoored and redirect a victim's browser through iframes to a landing page hosting the exploit kit where a Flash exploit awaits. The exploits generally target Internet Explorer, Zscaler said, and victims' computers are eventually infected with CryptoWall 3.0 ransomware. This analysis is in line with a similar report from the SANS Institute, which pointed the finger at a particular cybercrime group that had steered away from using the prolific Angler Exploit Kit and moved operations to Neutrino.
Botnet

Cleaning Up Botnets Takes Years, May Never Be Completed 74

Once a botnet has taken root in a large pool of computers, truly expunging it from them may be a forlorn hope. That, writes itwbennett, is: the finding of researchers in the Netherlands who analyzed the efforts of the Conficker Working Group to stop the botnet and find its creators. Seven years later, there are still about 1 million computers around the world infected with the Conficker malware despite the years-long cleanup effort. 'These people that remain infected — they might remain infected forever,' said Hadi Asghari, assistant professor at Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands. The research paper will be presented next week at the 24th USENIX Security Symposium in Washington, D.C. (And "Post-Mortem of a Zombie" is an exciting way to title a paper.)
Security

My United Airlines Website Hack Gets Snubbed 187

Bennett Haselton writes: United Airlines announced that they will offer up to 1 million air miles to users who can find security holes in their website. I demonstrated a way to brute-force a user's 4-digit PIN number and submitted it to them for review, emailing their Bugs Bounty contact address on three occasions, but I never heard back from them. Read on for the rest. If you've had a different experience with the program, please chime in below.
Crime

Interviews: Ask Brian Krebs About Security and Cybercrime 53

Brian Krebs got his start as a reporter at The Washington Post and after having his entire network taken down by the Lion Worm, crime and cybersecurity became his focus. In 2005, Krebs started the Security Fix blog and Krebs On Security in 2009, which remains one of the most popular sources of cybercrime and security news. Brian is credited with being the first journalist to report on Stuxnet and one of his investigative series on the McColo botnet is estimated to have led to a 40-70% decline in junk e-mail sent worldwide. Unfortunately for Krebs, he's also well known to criminals. In 2013 he became one of the first journalists to be a victim of Swatting and a few months later a package of heroin was delivered to his home. Brian has agreed to give us some of his time and answer any questions you may have about crime and cybersecurity. As usual, ask as many as you'd like, but please, one per post.

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