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Comparing Internet Cafe Rates Worldwide 273

Posted by simoniker
from the eating-out-sometimes-expensive dept.
tcd004 writes "I recently began compiling the hourly rates from Internet cafes around the world into a map. The result reveals wildly different prices, even in countries with similar economic conditions and technological development. This often puts access out of reach for large populations in developing countries who live on less than $1 per day. It seems government policies and telecom deregulation (in countries like Nigeria) are often the strongest forces determining a cafe's hourly rates. If you want to do some of your own rate hunting, take a look at sites like Cybercafes.com."
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Comparing Internet Cafe Rates Worldwide

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  • Government Subsidies (Score:5, Interesting)

    by Anonymous Coward on Friday July 02, 2004 @02:19PM (#9594221)
    What's interesting is that internet cafes in a number of the countries with low rates (Pakistan $0.60, Ghana $0.60, Indonesia $0.66, and Turkey $0.50) use government subsidies [iicd.org] to keep their rates down. Ghana, in particular, has done this as they believe that increased exposure to the outside world will help encourage its citizens to become literate.
    • by daveo0331 (469843) * on Friday July 02, 2004 @02:22PM (#9594263) Homepage Journal
      Ghana, in particular, has done this as they believe that increased exposure to the outside world will help encourage its citizens to become literate.

      I take it Ghana has never heard of AOL.
    • by base3 (539820) on Friday July 02, 2004 @02:38PM (#9594413)
      And the nice thing about subsidies, from the government's point of view, is that it makes an easy segway to regulation and monitoring.
      • Segway? (Score:3, Insightful)

        by Atario (673917)

        And the nice thing about subsidies, from the government's point of view, is that it makes an easy segway to regulation and monitoring.

        Do you mean subsidies are an expensive toy which gets you to the destination, but you could far more cheaply, and with the same ease, do the same thing some other way? Then yeah, they do make great Segways [segway.com] to those things.

        (It's spelled "segue" [reference.com], people. That said, you make a valid point -- either (Seg)way.)

    • I don't know about other countries, but I have a friend who owns an internet cafe in Turkey. I can say for sure there is no such direct support from the goverment.

      The reasons for low prices, however maybe related to the fact that minors go to internet cafes a lot to play Counter Strike, GTA etc. Obviously this is because, in Turkey, many houses don't have computer. As the minors are the main customer group, and they cannot effort expensive prices, I think math is clear.

      I should also mention that, my fri

    • I suppose government subsidies are better than the cafe sniffing traffic and using keyboard logging to subsidize the cost in other ways...
    • by nmk (781777)
      I'm currently running an ISP in Pakisan. Your perception of the role of government subsidies is inaccurate. Bandwidth is currently provided throughout Pakistan primarily by PTCL (Pakistan Telecom), which untill very recently was a protected monopoly. They are currently selling ISP's bandwidth for about 12 times the cost of their international circuit. We pay $6000/Mb, whereas their cost is somewhere in the region of 400-500 dollars. So if anything, we are getting ripped of royally.
      Low internet rates can be
    • by nmk (781777)
      I'm currently running an ISP in Pakisan. Your perception of the role of government subsidies is inaccurate. Bandwidth is currently provided throughout Pakistan primarily by PTCL (Pakistan Telecom), which untill very recently was a protected monopoly. They are currently selling ISP's bandwidth for about 12 times the cost of their international circuit. We pay $6000/Mb, whereas their cost is somewhere in the region of 400-500 dollars. So if anything, we are getting ripped of royally.

      Low internet rates can be

    • I've been living in Brazil the last 6 months and browsing slashdot occasionally. I can tell you cafe rates never approached $3.00 much less $3.50.

      I'm in Salvador paying 4 reis ~= $1.25. Yes, I've been to the more expensive south too.
  • by Anonymous Coward on Friday July 02, 2004 @02:19PM (#9594228)
    I AM THE SON OF A WEALTHY INTERNET CAFE GENERAL...i have a vast fortune that needs to be transfered out of the country...
    • Speaking of which (Score:3, Interesting)

      by Anonymous Coward
      Why do some ISPs etc. block e-mails sent from IPs of cybercafes that have been sent using the webmail service of a completely different website? It's fustrating when being on holiday and sending an e-mail to a friend, only to have it bounce because it was mistaken for spam. Sometimes, the e-mails don't even bounce, so you're not sure if your friend got it. ARGH!

      Yes, I know that spammers use Internet cafes to do their dirty deeds, but the spam-filters should somehow have the ability to detect a genuine e-m

  • Finally (Score:5, Funny)

    by otisaardvark (587437) on Friday July 02, 2004 @02:22PM (#9594251)
    We can start compiling better (and statistically, better 'weighted') indicators of PPP than the incredibly successful (but somewhat outdated) Big Mac Index [economist.com].
  • No Korea? (Score:5, Interesting)

    by Anonymous Coward on Friday July 02, 2004 @02:23PM (#9594269)
    I can't believe South Korea was skipped in this survey. They have one of the highest rates of internet cafes of any country I've ever been too. And they're really cheap to boot.
    • by Anonymous Coward
      And they're really cheap to boot.

      How much does it cost to actually use the computer? Turning on a computer is fun and all, but it gets a little boring after awhile.

      HAHHAHAHHH FUNNUNUY! I AM SO FNNUY!
    • I think the term "Internet Cafe" is extremely diluted. So it makes it hard to count certain cafes as Internet or not.

      You can hook up your own laptop, but limited access, does that count?

      They have a custom computer, but you can't access your own email, does that count?

      etc

      etc

      etc

      It goes on and on.

    • And they're really cheap to boot.

      Maybe that's why they got booted off the survey...

      Thank you. I'll be here all week. Try the bibimbap, I hear it's delicious!

  • by Globe199 (442245) on Friday July 02, 2004 @02:24PM (#9594282)
    Crappy cybercafe listing on Cybercafes.com. It still lists Cyber X [cybercafes.com] in Minneapolis. That place has been out of business for many years.

    The site doesn't even have a function to add or modify listings. All it has is a banner ad for cheese!

    Globe199
    • All it has is a banner ad for cheese!

      I hear the site is located in Wisconsin...

      On a side note: I checked for Cybercafes in India, and the very first entry says:
      ONLY CYBER CLUB WHO CARES FOR ITS CUSTOMERS & DOES NOT CHEAT.

      I'm glad they cleared that up..

    • I missed that place. It was never dull going there. Sure, the seating was an ergonomic mess, but where else.. ...do you get to see a drug deal take place? ....do you see the owner yell at customers(usually homeless people, etc) ...get panhandled for money from said homeless people?

      That place was as Uptown Minneapolis as you could get.
  • ...but I have no idea what their prices are as I have ADSL at home and thus have no need for such services. If I had to, I would look up prices for someone or other...

    Prices at Internet cafés are perhaps more interesting for tourists than anyone else. Then again, isn't the point of being on holiday to get away from it all, including (and especially?) the computer?

  • by MarvinMouse (323641) on Friday July 02, 2004 @02:27PM (#9594315) Homepage Journal
    I think those people have more serious issues than not being able to access the Internet. Sure, they cannot afford to view the internet, but the bigger question, is can they even afford to clothe themselves, eat, and have proper housing? When those three issues are resolved, then we should worry about the cost of internet cafes there.
    • by arieswind (789699) * on Friday July 02, 2004 @02:31PM (#9594354) Homepage
      Keep in mind that although they only make 1$/day, it probably costs a whole lot less to live in those countries, us americans have the highest cost of living in the world
      • Keep in mind that although they only make 1$/day, it probably costs a whole lot less to live in those countries, us americans have the highest cost of living in the world

        No. That would either be Japan or some places in europe. Americans have a generally low cost of living in comparison to the rest of te developed world. Food and nessecities are a relativly small % of take home pay. In absolute dollars, Americans pay less then most europeans and japanese. In japan a plain dress can be $100+ usd and a nice
    • Sure. $1 buys you a week's groceries in Bombay... and Bombay has a pretty high cost of living compared to other places in India.
    • Economic growth is the only way to raise standards of living in developing countries -- or any country for that matter. The Solow Growth Model [digitaleconomist.com] explains that this is a function of capital-labor ratio and population growth, but technological growth can impact this as well.

      In order to have growth, access to the rest of the world is pretty much a prerequisite, as is some element of a knowledge economy. For these to occur, access to the Internet is essential the way that the telephone was 50 years ago.

      So Inter
  • eZinternet Cafe (Score:5, Interesting)

    by djtripp (468558) <djtrippNO@SPAMgmail.com> on Friday July 02, 2004 @02:28PM (#9594317) Homepage Journal
    I love their sliding scale. When it's dead, you can get an hour for like 1 euro. If it's packed and super busy, it's 5-10 euro and hour.
  • Australia? (Score:4, Interesting)

    by Anonymous Coward on Friday July 02, 2004 @02:28PM (#9594322)
    That's an odd graph. Australia's rates show up as $7.50US an hour, that's over $10 AUS an hour.

    I've never seen internet cafe rates that high here, the most I've paid is $5AUS an hour, and that was in a music store that also provided free coffee.
  • I'd suggest... (Score:4, Insightful)

    by Otter (3800) on Friday July 02, 2004 @02:28PM (#9594323) Journal
    This is contrary to what seems to be the political slant of that site, but it seems to me that drawing conclusions about the affordabilty of Internet access by looking at the poorest of the poor in a given country seems unproductive.

    1) In the short- and medium-term, the question is what kind of access middle-class and upper-class people have. There seems to be some obsession with getting illiterate farmers technology that the average person in wealthy countries doesn't have, but to my mind that's far less relevant than the overall level of computer use and access.

    2) This analysis also ignores numbers. A single, dirt-cheap cyber-cafe provides far less access than 50 expensive, well-maintained ones, and it's the higher prices that allow greater numbers and decent tech and maintenance. Again, I suspect I'm going against the political grain of that site by saying so.

  • by InfiniteWisdom (530090) on Friday July 02, 2004 @02:28PM (#9594326) Homepage
    At least in Bomba, where I lived till 2002, cyber cafes cost a lot less than the $1.35 claimed... Rs.60/hour. I think Rs.25-30 is more typical.

    That said, maybe its different in smaller cities where cable/DSL isn't available, adn competition hasn't driven down ISP charges as much
    • It's still like that, I don't know where they came up with their Rs 60+ / hour rate. Maybe some really touristic place.

      In south Indian cities you can have fast internet for about 20 Rs an hour, that's less than half a dollar. In smaller cities and towns it's about the same rate, even cheaper, but then the connections are *really slow*.

    • I just got back from Costa Rica and found huge differnces in prices based on the level of local development. In San Jose, it was realativly cheap; 500 colones ($1.15) an hour, but in Pavones, an extremely rural community, the rate for their one available connection was 6000 ($13.79) an hour. The price in other areas fell between these, in accordance with how developed the local infrastructure was.
  • Not accurate (Score:5, Informative)

    by allanpatrick (793560) on Friday July 02, 2004 @02:28PM (#9594331) Homepage
    In Brazil, at least where I live, its hard to find a cybercafe that costs more than $1/hour.
    • Yep. I was astounded by the $6.45 in Sweden. Here in Finland (right next to it) I'd say that a typical rate would be around 1-2 euros an hour (the only price I could find on the net [tampere.fi] was 1,70e/h, about $2/h).

      However, it would seem that the type of net cafes differ from country to country. Here in Finland I don't know really of any place where the "main thing" is getting a net connection (excluding a small net-oriented library in the center of Helsinki, where access is free). However, some cafes have Int
  • This week I went to several Internet cafés in Montréal. They seemed expensive to me. One had a sign that said C$1 / 10 min -- which of course is C$6 an hour. Seemed a bit pricy to me.

    But that site says Canada costs US$4.50 / hour. Which is C$5.95 according to XE.com.
  • The newfies are part of Canada too.
  • by Anonymous Coward
    Who needs internet cafes? There are plenty of unsecured wireless access points.
    • This may be modded as funny, but it is true. I drive a few miles though some neighborhoods in my area: 90+ Networks found, over 50 were open.
  • by GillBates0 (664202) on Friday July 02, 2004 @02:32PM (#9594361) Homepage Journal
    What do the Gray areas on the World Map indicate? Most of Europe is gray, and the key does not explain the meaning of this color.

    The page linked to from "under $1 a day" does not carry information/statistics about specific countries, but provides only an overview by continent. I'm a little skeptical about the "Percentage of population living below $1.00" - according to the map, only 5 countries: Nicaragua, India, Namibia, Ghana and Kenya qualify as "dark red". I would suspect this is not the case - Pakistan and other fareastern countries for example should be in this range, rather than the green (developed) range.

    And again, I'm not sure how useful the "under $1.00 per day" statistic is, because it most certainly does not take into consideration, the standard of living - a loaf of bread costs about $2.00 in the US and 25c in other countries I know.

    Just my vulcan $0.02.

  • by Ryu2 (89645) * on Friday July 02, 2004 @02:37PM (#9594400) Homepage Journal
    $2.50/hr for China? Perhaps in hotels and other places that cater to businessmen or "rich" foreigners, but even in Beijing, in college areas, you can get online for 10 yuan (about $1.25)/hour at most. At some second-tier cities, the going rate is about 2 yuan (25 cents). You get exactly the same access -- the only difference is that you might be surrounded by smoking kids playing Counterstrike around you...
  • by jj_johny (626460) on Friday July 02, 2004 @02:39PM (#9594419)
    The assumtption is that Cyber Cafes are not accessible to the general public is a problem. That kind of business (Cyber Cafes)is oriented toward those that people who have some money and need to contact the outside world with something other than mail or telephone. So what am I supposed to do with your map anyways plan my next vacation?

    And as for the relationship between price and government policy, I would be more interested to see what the relationship is between government policy in new areas like the Internet vs the government policy in general.

    In Kazakstan, the capital had a couple of Cafes that went for $1 or 2 / hour. It made life much more bearable there when the only English is the occasional English language video on the TV.

  • Whre I live you can get Ar $1.5 per hour. And that's in the main city. Since exchange rate is Ar$3=U$S1 it's like 50 US cents per hour. The only way they could reach that cost is on certain cibercafes on remote tourist zones where they might cost that. I've only seen two and those where on places where only hicking and alpinist tourists go.
    The overwhelming amount of population has U$S0.66 an hour internet in this country. So I might take a serious dubt about the veracity of those numbers.
    • I back that up.

      In Bariloche... read tourist trap.. I paid around US 50c an hour.. downtown, in amongst all the chocolate shops.. .which is the most expensive part of the city as its where all the tourists are.
  • by Bubblehead (35003) on Friday July 02, 2004 @02:39PM (#9594424) Homepage Journal
    I backpacked in Asia [jastram.de] a few years ago, and it was great to have Internet access at reasonable prices virtually everywhere. But I had an interesting experience in Thailand (not covered by the comparison chart). Rates were around $1/hour. But then I visited the island Samui, where rates were $5. It was clear that (1) the main market were tourists, and (2) due to the small size of the island, a price cartel had formed.

    Just looking at the numbers, the article seems to capture non-tourist prices. But it's important not to forget that prices are often not based on real cost, but on the customer's willingness to pay.

    • I was in Thailand a couple of years ago and also remember rates being around $1/hour. Competition in big cities was so stiff I remember one place that was $1.50/hour but offered a foot massage while you were online
  • Screw cyber cafes (Score:5, Informative)

    by Sparr0 (451780) <sparr0@gmail.com> on Friday July 02, 2004 @02:42PM (#9594452) Homepage Journal
    I travel on a regular basis and have to work away from my hotel for very long (but sparse) hours. This leaves me much free time where I wish I could get to a net connection. The solution? Public Libraries. Almost every library in the country even remotely close to a decent sized population will have some sort of internet connection available to patrons, for *FREE* 90% of the time.
  • Broadband and computers will get cheaper, and the home experience will rival that of the cafe one.

    Internet Cafe's have the same exact problem as the arcades of the 80's and 90's. They will need to think "outside the box" in order to get people to continue to pump money into them. Arcades did it by offering experiences that just could not be brought back into the home, i.e. slick interfaces (DDR) or cockpits that truly immerse the player into the experience.

    I've watched 2 Lan Centers (places to play q3a,
  • Responses (Score:5, Interesting)

    by tcd004 (134130) * on Friday July 02, 2004 @02:45PM (#9594480) Homepage
    Just a quick response to many of the excellent points made in the comments so far:

    1. "Hey, I was in X country and the price was cheaper/more expensive!"
    Yes, prices vary dramatically across nearly every country. When we compiled this data we were seeking out numbers that best represented the most common price in a particular country. For instance, in Saudi Arabia, you can pay $15 U.S for access if you want, but you can also find places who offer it for $3. These numbers are in no way meant to accuraly represent every price of every internet cafe in every country.

    2. What do the grey areas represent? Aren't there more countries with high poverty levels?
    Grey countries were not included in this survey. Data may have existed for them, but this was originally published in print, and we had a limted amount of space. And yes, many, many other countries live on less than $1 per day. We simply picked a representative sampling.

    3. Why do people who live on $1 per day need to worry about internet access?

    Good question. First of all, don't literally think of "$1 per day" to mean just that. The point of this exercise was to show that Cafe prices don't often serve their local populations, due to the fact that they're too expensive. The $1 figure is simply an effective way to point out countries with large populations of people living in poverty.

    Why do poor people need the internet? Well, often the internet is considered to be a great democratizing and equalizing force. The people who most need equalizing are people who live in poverty. If they can't afford to get on the internet, then how is it improving their lives? Maybe through indirect means?

    In any case, our goal was simply to inspire people to ask questions like these. We seem to have been successful. Thanks for your comments!

    Tcd004
    • Re:Responses (Score:5, Interesting)

      by Mad Bad Rabbit (539142) on Friday July 02, 2004 @03:05PM (#9594649)
      It might be interesting to see a map in terms of the hours of work (at average local wages) required to
      purchase an hour of Internet cafe.

      I.e. in the U.S.A. (average wage ~ $15/hour), the cost would be 0.3 hours. In Namibia (average wage
      ~ $1/hour) the cost would be 2.5 hours, etc.
    • 1. "Hey, I was in X country and the price was cheaper/more expensive!"

      One trend that appears in most countries relates to the size of city. I was in Vietnam last year and the cost of Internet access in Saigon/HCMC was about 3 times more than in somewhere smaller like the town of Hue ($0.50-1.00/hour).

      3. Why do people who live on $1 per day need to worry about internet access?

      In Hue, the young man running the place was clearly letting his friends and extended family use the spare PCs for e-mailing etc. G

    • If you're an idiot, or you're consciously aware that your 'Study' is a pile of crap and you just want the extra traffic to your site.

      Why do poor people need millions of dollars? Often, millions of dollars is considered to be a great democratizing and equalizing force. The people who most need equalizing are people who live in poverty. If they can't afford millions of dollars, how is it improving their lives? Maybe through trickle-down Reaganomics?

      In any case, our goal was simply to get a bunch of peop
    • Again, thanks for feedback and comments.

      We collected prices by calling, visiting cafes, emailing, and via cafes' published rates on the internet.

      There is no guarantee that all of our prices are perfect repesentations. Even sampling 20 or 30 cafes in a country that houses 20,000 is too limited of a sample to be called definitive.

      In some cases, we may reevaluate our data if we can get solid evidence that our prices are wrong. Again, this is a piece meant to illustrate the divides between many countries and
      • > In some cases, we may reevaluate our data if we > can get solid evidence that our prices are wrong. What do you need for solid evidence? First of all, the majority of internet cafes are not going to have websites. What's the point? People don't go to one net-cafe to look for a cheaper one. As I stated in another post, in Chile, where I have lived and travelled widely, I have _never_ seen a netcafe as expensive as US$3. The centre of Santiago is full of places for between 400 and 600 peso per hour
    • But, as I mention in a post of mine, the price you've put as rough average for Sweden is way off. If I had to put an average, I'd put it closer to around $4.5-$5
  • In related news, a study has shown that the high price of luxary cars puts them out of reach of large populations in developing countries.

    Hell, internet cafe rates put internet access (through a cafe anyway) outside the reach of large populations of AMERICANS. Newsflash: Stuff isn't free, and poor people can't buy non-essential stuff.

    Slashdot: The Obvious for Nerds. Stuff any idiot with a little bit of common sense already knows.
  • ..atleast in the case of India. I'm from India and can confidently say that on an average the hourly rate is $0.50-$0.60(Around Rs 20) without government subsidy.

    The current rate of $1.35(Around Rs 60) is wrong. I'm not sure how this data was compiled.
  • by beanyk (230597) on Friday July 02, 2004 @02:57PM (#9594581)
    I looked at Ireland's entries on the world-wide map, and most of the prices seem to be quoted in Irish Pounds. Since Ireland's been using the euro exclusively for a year-and-a-half (I lose track, lving away from home), either (a) the info's out of date; (b) the contributers are using the pound symbol instead of the euro. Which is it?
    • by anticypher (48312) <anticypher AT gmail DOT com> on Friday July 02, 2004 @08:05PM (#9596862) Homepage
      The cybercafes.com site was created in about 1996, and abandoned in 2000, I think. I found cybercafes.com in my bookmarks of client sites from 1997, but the domain obviously changed hands since then. A quick glance through their database shows a couple of cafes I know haven't been around since 2000 or 2001. Their entries for Belgium and France still show francs for currency, so it isn't just Ireland.

      Its a cobweb site. Nothing to see here, move along, move along. There will be a repost of this article over the weekend by CmdrTaco.

      the AC

  • I just got back from traveling Europe and what I noticed was that basically, the places will charge whatever works in the area.

    Touristy places will screw you over, period. My hotel wanted 1 quid for 10 minutes, while the indian shop down the road wanted 1 quid for 80 minutes.

    Ask locals, they'll know the cheap spots.

    This is especially important in small areas like Venice where everything is so scattered around.

    • Re:Europe (Score:3, Informative)

      by tuxette (731067) *
      Ask locals, they'll know the cheap spots.

      Not necessarily. I know where a lot of Internet cafés are located in Oslo, but I have no idea what they charge. If someone on one of the travel boards I'm on asked me for prices of Internet cafés in Oslo, I'd investigate for them. Other than that, I have no reason to know, and wouldn't be able to help someone who asked me on the street.

  • There is one Internet Cafe in Wallace, ID and the ad in the local newspaper claims $1/hour access time for e-mail, web browsing or what ever.
  • $1-$2/h depending on location, quality of computers and connection, time you pay for (1h cheaper than 2x30min) etc.
  • Rate in Uzbekistan (Score:5, Informative)

    by suso (153703) on Friday July 02, 2004 @03:09PM (#9594683) Homepage Journal
    In Tashkent, Uzbekistan (right below Kazakstan) last December, I went into a cyber cafe that was $0.30/hour. I was impressed. But of course the average salary there is $50/month. Yes, per month. Average.
  • by WeLoveRa (708113) on Friday July 02, 2004 @03:14PM (#9594728)
    I've recently been to Chile and Russia and paid less than $1 an hour in each. Nowhere near the $3 listed. Where did these guys gather their information from, tourist hotels? No matter how poor the country, internet access can only get so cheap, you still need a computer which is likely imported. Elecronics always seem to be about the same price, no matter what country you're in.
  • Easy in London (Score:4, Informative)

    by neonstz (79215) * on Friday July 02, 2004 @03:14PM (#9594730) Homepage

    I paid about 10 UK pounds (about $18 or something) for a week at Easy Internet Cafe in London a few years ago. No time limit other than that (they closed at 2AM).

  • Having never been to a Cyber Cafe, let me ask... this is a place where they provide the computer AND net connection, right? We're not talking about a coffee shop with wireless access? Forgive my ignorance, but I stay in to surf or hit the beach!

    Peace

  • by mo (2873)
    Interesting that in this article, Nigeria has that highest cost/income ratio in the world.

    I bet I can guess the reason [419eater.com]
  • by Shinobi (19308) on Friday July 02, 2004 @03:19PM (#9594772)
    They are one of the following:

    A: Way too old. It hasn't cost that much on average for several years now.

    B: Only sampled from some particular hotels etc, that aren't internet cafés as such.

    C: Made up.

    Matrix, a large internet café in Stockholm charges around $4/hour for non-members. They also have some packages where it becomes cheaper. Dragons Lair charges around $2/hour. Nexuz about 2-4, depending on time etc.

    Same thing with other places around Sweden.
  • Mexico and Nigeria (Score:3, Interesting)

    by Pedrito (94783) on Friday July 02, 2004 @03:20PM (#9594782) Homepage
    It seems government policies and telecom deregulation (in countries like Nigeria) are often the strongest forces determining a cafe's hourly rates.

    Are we really sure we want any more Nigerians on the internet? Haven't they abused it enough?

    But on a more serious note, back in '98, I helped open the first two internet cafes in Playa del Carmen, Mexico. Playa is a pretty big tourist destination these days. At the time, there was only one ISP in town (which I assisted at off an on as well). We started off sharing a 56k dial-up line with 8 computers at each cafe. When we first opened, we were charging a peso a minute, which is roughly $0.10/min. We were making a killing.

    Well, word got out we were making bank and within 1 year of the first cafe opening, there were 26 of them in town. Then the price wars began and we eventually ended up at around 10 pesos/hr (about $1.00/hr).

    The two owners of the first cafe split (because one was an alcoholic and he spent most of the company money on the most expensive booze he could find). That first cafe went out of business within a few months. Largely because of the alcoholic owner, partly because of the mice, scorpions, and other things that made it just a nasty place. But in fact, a lot of the cafes that appeared in that first year went out of business because of the price wars.

    Our second cafe ended up surviving the war (and is still around today, visit Atomic Cafe on Calle 8 con Avenida 5), but largely because we made internet a secondary concern and concentrated on the bar business. There are still a couple of places that offer exclusively internet access and I have no idea how they survive. Most of the rest that survived ended up doing other things.

    Anyway, that's my internet cafe story. Glad to be out of that business now. The early days were fun, though.
  • Um, Sorry, he says $7/hour for the UK, but I spent a week in london recently and there was only one place out of many where it was two pounds an hour; everywhere else was just one pound.
  • by country only? (Score:3, Informative)

    by chochos (700687) on Friday July 02, 2004 @03:23PM (#9594815) Homepage Journal
    I live in Mexico City. The site says the rate here in this country is $2.25. You can find this rate in the most exclusive cafes in the city; however there are places that go for $1.50 and even $1 in other areas.

    In Xalapa, the capital of Veracruz, the hourly rate is about 50 cents of a dollar. There are even some places that charge by the minute, 12 cents of a peso for a minute (which amounts to about 63 cents of a dollar, for a whole hour).

    So, is this chart showing the price for the most expensive rate found in the country, or for an average, or what?

    Does anybody know if the rates shown for other countries are as inaccurate as the rate for Mexico?
  • Ecuador (Score:3, Informative)

    by erykjj (213892) on Friday July 02, 2004 @03:38PM (#9594941)
    about $0.80/hr
  • by Mateito (746185) on Friday July 02, 2004 @03:51PM (#9595056) Homepage
    The prices in Chile are nowhere near US$300 an hour.

    In Santiago (the capital), internet access is around 400-600 pesos per hour. US$1 = CLP$650, so we are talking 60 - 90 US cents. I've also seen these rates on the beach side towns and in the south (on the Island of Chiloe, currently isolated from the mainland due to band weather, but still with reasonably priced internet).

    In places like San Pedro de Atacama in the North and Puerto Natales in the South, both remote places heavily infested with gringo touriests, you might push $1000 an hour, so US$1.50 max.
  • by tomwhore (10233) on Friday July 02, 2004 @05:19PM (#9595826) Homepage Journal
    We offer connectivity at over 100 locations throughout the Portland Oregon area for the amazing price of

    $0

    www.personaltelco.net

    How do we do this? Its a little something called Community and it seems to be a far more powerfull force in this town then all the T-mobile run hotspots combined.

    Welcome to Portland.

    -tomhiggins
    www.personaltelco.net

    • You dont belive me?? Ok here is a list a a handfull of cafes you can get $0 access at.
      Some of these are even next to or in areas of ForPay wif cafes.

      Enjoy the Connectivity while you juice up on the java.

      Pioneer Courthouse Square Area(covers a few cafes)-SW 6th and Morrison

      Powell's Bookstore World Cup Cafe-NW 10th and Burnside

      Stumptown Coffee Roasters-SW 3rd and Ash

      Anna Bannanas-NW 21st and Northup

      World Cup Coffee and Tea- NW 18th and Glisan

      Ecotrust- NW 10th and Johnson

      Coffee Plant-SW Broadway and Wa
  • by Anonymous Coward on Friday July 02, 2004 @08:11PM (#9596894)
    Here in Venezuela the rate is 0.60$ (without subsidies)

    Gasoline costs 0.03$ per liter (gasoline is cheaper than coke and water).

    A BigMac costs 2$ (too expensive for the crap you get).

    A Whoper costs 3$ (this is a good meal).

    A Grand Cherokee Limited 2004 costs NaN$ (30,000$ basic model, ouch!)

    BTW, the minimum wage is 90$ a month, a graduated computer engineer (at least me!) makes 6,000$ a year.

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