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Interview With Lead Yoper Linux Developer 208

Posted by timothy
from the factionalism dept.
Bongoots writes "Andy Kissner from Linuxforums.org has just posted this: 'In the past few weeks, there has been a lot of hype and controversy surrounding Yoper, ranging from insults to ruthless Gentoo comparisons. I recently sat down with Andreas Girardet, who is a key developer for Yoper, to dispell all the rumors and discuss the direction in which the Yoper project is headed.' Click here to read the rest of the interview."
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Interview With Lead Yoper Linux Developer

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  • Oh well (Score:5, Interesting)

    by Surye (580125) <surye80&gmail,com> on Tuesday September 21, 2004 @08:11PM (#10314599) Homepage
    I was excited about this for my old 350mhz celeron laptop. Unfortunately, on completely default install settings, it crashed and burned on the first boot. Back to gentoo + distcc.
    • Re:Oh well (Score:3, Informative)

      by GreyPoopon (411036)
      I was excited about this for my old 350mhz celeron laptop.

      Were the old 350Mhz celerons considered i686 or only i586? I can't remember, but I think they were all i686. But in the unlikely event they were i586-based, that is why it crashed and burned for you. Too bad. I was hoping to get some impression of how it would run on my old 200 MHz Pentium Pro. Anybody else try on a slower machine like that?

      • It is a i686, I thought of that too. I may try it on an extra desktop, but that was the only machine I had a reason not to use gentoo on. I'll just put Debian Cid on there again, it worked like a charm before.
        • Re:Oh well (Score:3, Funny)

          by koali (175176)
          OT: You just made my day. There is a plethora of Linux 'redistros' in Spain, a lot of them based on Debian.

          Someone needs to invent Debian El Cid Campeador; bleeding edge Debian for Spaniards.

          (El Cid is a popular folk hero in Spain)
      • Re:Oh well (Score:1, Offtopic)

        by Surye (580125)
        Shit. I stand corrected. Fuck. *ashamed* I hate you Celeron.
      • Re:Oh well (Score:5, Informative)

        by sparcnut (775902) on Tuesday September 21, 2004 @08:54PM (#10314899)
        Were the old 350Mhz celerons considered i686 or only i586? I can't remember, but I think they were all i686. But in the unlikely event they were i586-based, that is why it crashed and burned for you. Too bad. I was hoping to get some impression of how it would run on my old 200 MHz Pentium Pro. Anybody else try on a slower machine like that?

        Celerons are all i686 class as are Pentium Pros and Pentium IIs. Pentiums and Pentium-MMXs are i586.

        I had Slackware 9.0 running on a P2-233 with 64M RAM a couple years ago and it was reasonably fast, even running Mozilla 1.4. Expect a PPro-200 to be the same or slightly better because the PPro's L2 cache is clocked twice as fast as on the P2. Slack 9.0 is mostly optimized from i386 to i586 depending on the packages, so expect Yoper to be _much_ faster.

        I'd say it would be manageable for email, web browsing, and that kind of thing but not much more. It'd make a real nice X terminal if you have some bigger boxes on a 100mbit network.
        • Got benchmarks? (Score:5, Insightful)

          by Rex Code (712912) <rexcode@gmail.com> on Wednesday September 22, 2004 @02:21AM (#10316500)
          Slack 9.0 is mostly optimized from i386 to i586 depending on the packages, so expect Yoper to be _much_ faster.

          Slackware is already optimized with -mcpu=i686, and has been for a long time (yes, even Slackware 9.0). The fact that it also uses -march=i486 really doesn't slow it down, since very few things make use of the extended opcodes.

          Since processor optimizations are often touted as a major advantage, I'd be interested in knowing a few programs where the difference between "-march=i486 -mcpu=i686" and "-march=i686 -mcpu=i686" is measurable. I've been unable to find any so far.
    • Re:Oh well (Score:4, Interesting)

      by FlipmodePlaya (719010) on Tuesday September 21, 2004 @08:28PM (#10314732) Journal
      In the interview he stated that a LiveCD version is planned, so we will all have an easy way to see if it is appropriate for our systems.
  • by starphish (256015) on Tuesday September 21, 2004 @08:13PM (#10314615) Homepage
    "Right now I am with IBM, and in my spare time I work on Yoper."

    Watch out. IBM might own your thoughts. Make sure you don't think about Yoper at work.
    • Re:Thought Police. (Score:3, Interesting)

      by DriedClexler (814907)
      They actually might start doing that. If you tangibly support such a project that goes contrary to IBM's interest, they could fire or even sue you. Happened to a friend of mine (not at IBM). Tread lightly.
      • Did you check which country he was from? Not all countries have stupid IP laws you know...
        • No matter which country he is from, we are just talking about the contract he signed with IBM the day he was hired. Since I worked for IBM in the past, I think I can told you this contract is much restrictive in this specific field and I was told (ok, ok, being told is not really authoritative) the contracts are now even more restrictive. We I was hired a long time ago by IBM, there were so much less opportunities to write code and think about IT business off-hours, in fact, it was just expensive to enter t
          • Re:Thought Police. (Score:3, Informative)

            by lakeland (218447)
            No. US contract law is very different to contract law in other countries. Outside the land of the free we have these things called 'inalienable rights', and no contract may interfere with them. For instance, no contract can say 'you may not have children while employed here', or 'you may not work for a compeditor after you leave', or 'we own what you produce in your free time'.

            Any contract stupid enough to interfere with his free time would be thrown out of court within minutes, and IBM forced to pay al
            • Isn't he a New Zealander? If that's the case then yes, IBM would have absolutely no rights to what he does in his spare time.
            • I was not talking about the US contract, my fault I should have specified it in the first place it was a contract signed in Canada.

              So, that's nice to hear somewhere else there is better laws to protect employees than here. I was a little bit mixed up by your comment since you were talking about IP laws.

              So, what would happen in a case where the employee will got an idea for a super-gizmo because he was working at IBM (or any other company) and decided to develop the super-gizmo on his spare time, but wasn

              • Re:Thought Police. (Score:3, Informative)

                by lakeland (218447)
                If you ever do any of your idea on company time, e.g. chat about it to colleagues in lunch time, then the company owns a share of it. My limited experience is they own a fairly big share of it.

                As an employee of a sub-contractor, I _believe_ the contract you're currently working on would be irrelevant, i.e. did you develop it while working on the sub-contractor's time.

                If you are actually working as a contractor then you're not an employee and so contracts can be more severe -- unless your work is treated
                • Well, thanks for these explainations. I was wondering if there was publicized trials on these issues that clarified some gray zones.

                  Well, when I mean contractor, sub-contractor, I am talking about the employee. For example, as a contractor, I am also an employee. Who is liable? The company or the employee? And since the law restrict the rights of the company, what will happen in such a case? I guess the rights in a contract should also be restricted, since it will be a little bit insane to render a company

          • in some countries there's rights you can't sign away even if you tried.

        • Did you check which country he was from? Not all countries have stupid IP laws you know...
          Not for long, thanks to The New American Century [newamericancentury.org]...
    • Re:Thought Police. (Score:5, Informative)

      by zaxios (776027) <zaxios@gmail.com> on Tuesday September 21, 2004 @08:39PM (#10314818) Journal
      Watch out. IBM might own your thoughts. Make sure you don't think about Yoper at work.

      Just to be safe, don't think at work at all. If you didn't catch the parent's comment, it was a reference to this travesty [slashdot.org]. In this case, offtopic + insightful = funny.
  • by Anonymous Coward
    Mod me flamebait or troll if you must but his ego is way out there.
    • by jr87 (653146)

      [AG] It is not rocket science and if one has the know-how, one could tweak their Gentoo, LFS, or even Debian system to be like Yoper. You would probably spend weeks/months doing it, but after this long, possibly frustrating road, you would get something like Yoper. But instead of a week-long struggle, you can have Yoper ready within 10 to 15 minutes,which to many people is more important than a steep, frustrating learning curve. Some of the "secrets" of turning your distro into Your Operating System are:

      • Well I guess you missed the part right before that where he listed like 5 other things than prelinking, and yes some of those other items can take quite some time.
      • Weeks and months? has he ever tried prelinking..was pretty quick and painless for me. thanks to the nice guide [gentoo.org]

        Not only has he tried prelinking, but he has tried (among other things) applying performance-related patches, stripping the binaries and ignoring what ./configure finds and instead only including objects upon which each package is truly dependant. I think that pretty much justifies the weeks to months timeframe listed.

        • No, seriously, this guy is either an idiot, or has never really used gentoo. Let's look at his list here:

          0.) Performance patches from Con Kolivas, i686 2.6.7 kernel, reiserfs
          1.) All original sources, minimal patches.
          2.) Compiled with i686 against latest gcc
          3.) Stripping
          4.) Prelinking
          5.) Latest gcc and glibc and other sources
          6.) Keep everything only dependent to what it really needs not what
          the ./configure happens to find.
          7.) Hdparm on install

          0) Check. And the option of quite a few other patchsets includ

          • by BrokenHalo (565198)
            No, seriously, this guy is either an idiot, or has never really used gentoo.

            Another obligatory post from a Gentoo zealot.

            I don't have any particular beef against Gentoo (except that I don't use it because I have too many machines with different architectures), but this kind of message strikes me as clawing for trendy-geek points. If you want to be a true geek, you might consider rolling your own (Linux From Scratch, in other words). Following a series of instructions from a recipe-book doesn't qualify.

            As f

            • Yes, you are quite correct, many of the individual points are available with many mainstream distributions, gentoo included -- something that this fellow claims is not the case. Thus, by illustrating this, you contribute to my point that he is an idiot.

              As far as your thinly veiled claims that I use gentoo because it is "trendy", I give you extra troll points for mixing in an ad hominem attack with information that supports my point in a clumsy effort to demean gentoo users. I've tried LFS, and while it was

          • No, seriously, this guy is either an idiot, or has never really used gentoo. Let's look at his list here:

            Thank you for providing a rather redundant (at least for me) list of all the options you have with Gentoo. Now, tell me how long it will take for you to determine what works best for each and every package on your system. What about all of the configuration options that you CAN'T control with the USE flags? Think about it for a minute. An expert with Gentoo could probably get through everything in

    • Yes indeed. And what is the purpose of this distro? Is he doing because he is very smart and simply wants to build his own? Does it serve any specialized purpose for which no other distro meets the need? Or, is it simply a "vanity" distro that only serves to muddy the waters of compatibility to further alienate non-Linux OS users? Another fucking distro is not what we need.

      This guy should donate his time to another Linux distro in search of purpose, most of which have been mentioned here. Or better yet, l

      • Re:Wasted Time (Score:2, Insightful)

        by trewornan (608722)
        This is exactly what Open Source is about:

        Don't like any of the distros out there - roll your own! Then if you want to you can make it available to anybody else who wants it - very nice of him to do this. Don't like his distro - don't use it! Only like certain bits - take the code for those bits and use it in your own distro or submit a patch for whatever your chosen distro is!

        Why is this a problem . . . the more the better, good for him!

        • This is exactly what Open Source is about

          Open Source? Ugh.

          I think the parent's point was that lots of half-arsed distros only tend to flood the minds of people who are coming to free software and GNU/Linux.

          I think UserLinux could be really good for this, even it's not GNUserLinux.
  • by marcushnk (90744) <`senectus' `at' `gmail.com'> on Tuesday September 21, 2004 @08:20PM (#10314664) Journal
    and it is quite nice.. and shows some great promise.. the only thing it lacks is the number of contributers.. comon people.. get in while its hot.. add more brains to this project and make it what it should be.
  • This guy rules (Score:5, Insightful)

    by carambola5 (456983) on Tuesday September 21, 2004 @08:20PM (#10314670) Homepage
    Some of the "secrets" of turning your distro into Your Operating System are:


    0.) Performance patches from Con Kolivas, i686 2.6.7 kernel, reiserfs
    1.) All original sources, minimal patches. ...

    Well, at least we know he isn't some PR person faking being a dev.
    • by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday September 21, 2004 @08:37PM (#10314802)
      Well, at least we know he isn't some PR person faking being a dev.
      Rather, he's a Dev faking being a PR person
    • This is modded insightful, but am I the only one who sees the inherent contradiction in those two statements? I laughed, and then saw the mod rating...
  • by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday September 21, 2004 @08:23PM (#10314702)
    The phrase "united front" mean anything to the linux community?
    • by Platinum Dragon (34829) on Tuesday September 21, 2004 @10:37PM (#10315501) Journal
      The phrase "united front" mean anything to the linux community?

      Maybe not, but my hackles tend to go up when I hear terms like "unity" and "united front" tossed around, perhaps because they tend to be used by Troktskyites and other vanguardists wanting everyone to follow their way, and only their way.

      Yes, I hang around in some fringe circles. Hang around for a moment, this is going somewhere.

      An anarchist would be more concerned with solidarity between groups that share common goals--you can have tens, even thousands of different projects and groups, but they work best when sharing ideas and supporting each other instead of each group demanding that everyone else follow behind their glorious leadership.

      How might this esoteric political argument apply to software?

      I cringe whenever I hear about "the next killer distro that will take over" or silly distro holy wars over Debian vs. Gentoo vs. Mandrake vs. Fedora as "the desktop distro." OTOH, cooperative efforts like freedesktop.org, the Linux Standards Base, and some of the efforts to bridge the KDE and GNOME desktops with common protocols make me smile. In situations like these, software "solidarity" can allow for numerous distributions aimed at different groups of people to work well together because they share common protocols and technologies, interchangeable stuff when possible.

      Mind you, this submission bugged the crap out of me, precisely because the submitter came across in a combative, pseudo-underdog fashion that seems intended to bleed mindshare from other distributions in favour of one group's (or individual's) ego, rather than trying to just make a better collection of software or doing one thing better so that others can learn and benefit.

      Bah, I'm exhausted, and I'm not sure this made much sense, but there you have it--I think what the real problem facing the FOSS community is false unity versus real solidarity.
    • Yeah, because United Linux all worked out wonderfully...
  • by zecg (521666) on Tuesday September 21, 2004 @08:24PM (#10314703)
    ...being valued based on how 1337 they are or what other distribution they have spawned from and how politically correct its roots are re: OS ideology.

    Modern distribution should focus on a system for upgrading / installing which handles dependencies well, a base of hand-picked packages covering as many functions with quality software, making the installation process as easy and transparent as possible, building a community and encouraging its members to provide well-written documentation and lobbying with hardware vendors for open drivers (e.g. ATI).

    Also, some professional-quality design work for the website and visual presentation wouldn't hurt.

    Most everyone is going to use Linux in another 10 years (barring a totalitarian world government which bans it as a tool of terrorism) - so get on with the program, people.
    • Well off you go then, let us know how it works out.

      Seriously, if all the people who demanded an easy to use yet just as powerful linux distro while slagging off the rest as being too hard/a big pain in the arse actually sat down and tried to build what they wanted, we could have it by now.

      This is the joy of OS, if you don't like what the other guy is doing, take it in a new direction.

      • by dan_sdot (721837) on Tuesday September 21, 2004 @08:46PM (#10314853)

        Seriously, if all the people who demanded an easy to use yet just as powerful linux distro while slagging off the rest as being too hard/a big pain in the arse actually sat down and tried to build what they wanted, we could have it by now.
        I don't think that he was saying this "this distro sucks."
        I think was he was saying was: "Who gives a crap?"
        So somebody created a new distro, wow, thats special. And what does this have to offer? Exactly what he was saying, that it super 1337. These stories come out every so often, and the /. hive mind pays the distro homage, but the thing doesn't really offer what linux really needs.
    • by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday September 21, 2004 @08:52PM (#10314887)
      Yoper sounds neat; and to be honest, all the modern Linux distros I've tried (Mandrake, Suse, Knoppix) work out of the box as long as you're content to use whatever is included in the initial installation.

      However, as a desktop OS, there are three things every user needs that no distro provides yet:

      1. Easy installation of any Linux software. Don't give me RPM-hell, dependency hell, command-line compiling, proprietary click-n-run depositories, or any other excuses. Only the Mac does it right: you drag the icon to your Applications folder. Voilà. The first distro to accomplish this will be king.

      2. Simple, centralized, user-friendly control panels for *everything*, with smart defaults. Why does Mandrake, arguably the most desktop-ready distro, still have printer settings in PrinterDrake, printer settings in the KDE control center, and another panel full of printer settings in the KDE menu?

      3. Better support for basic peripherals, like printers and scanners. It's tough shopping for printers at Staples when you know that nothing on the shelf is likely to work.

      I'm not saying I have the solutions, but these are major problems that all regular computer users have when grappling with Linux.
      • by Anonymous Coward
        Only the Mac does it right: you drag the icon to your Applications folder. Voilà. The first distro to accomplish this will be king.

        Ah, so the first distro who becomes a hardware maker with rock solid control over computer configurations so that every machine looks exactly like every other machine will be king.

        Why does Mandrake, arguably the most desktop-ready distro, still have printer settings in PrinterDrake, printer settings in the KDE control center, and another panel full of printer settings i
      • Easy installation of any Linux software. Don't give me RPM-hell, dependency hell, command-line compiling, proprietary click-n-run depositories, or any other excuses. Only the Mac does it right: you drag the icon to your Applications folder. Voilà. The first distro to accomplish this will be king.

        That's a very hard thing to do. The closest most distros have come is custom software repositories to serve packages in the right format for their distro. But as long as there is more than one linux, this

        • by Anonymous Coward
          " The closest most distros have come is custom software repositories to serve packages in the right format for their distro. But as long as there is more than one linux, this problem will remain."

          Perhaps - but if you had a distro that:

          1. Used binary packages with all libraries and dependencies included, à la Mac OS X.

          2. Kept user-installed apps in an accessible Applications directory, represented like a single icon (again, like the Mac).

          3. Was smart enough to compile and build such packages if an R
      • The main issue here is that for "any Linux software" to work, you either need to statically compile it up-front, or you need all the right versions of all dependencies... or you compile it from source.

        But I'm hoping that something like GoboLinux eventually ends up with your "easy installation" paradigm.

        At the moment, a set of gobo scripts can fairly easily any app which uses the familiar "./configure && make && make install" mechanism. Applications once installed end up in directories by t

      • by poptones (653660) on Tuesday September 21, 2004 @11:37PM (#10315872) Journal
        1) You are thinking like a geek way too much. Why the hell whould I worry about what folder something goes into? The way software is installed on linux parts of an app go into several different folders anyway.

        If you want to make it easy to install software, make a control panel app with some sanity that allows easy selection of all available software. With the exception of having four separate buttons and stupid nagscreen on each ("you just said you want to - install, remove, manage - software... is it ok if we do that now?") mandrake is pretty close to doing this. But you still have to set it up for the package repository, and the search capabilities suck. Both these issues could be fully addressed by someone wiling to create and maintain a proper website dedicated to the task and/or create a better installation panel. But it's already so very close as to be a non issue: how often do you launch software by drilling down to it's folder? I don't ever - if it's installed it's probably on my path, so I just type the name from a command line or the "Run..." box.

        2) I recently setup a friend's computer to run mdk10. She's a 40 year old mom of a teenager who spends most of her time online in mud-type forums and playing games, and she got her first system MAYBE ten years ago. The one I was working on is an HP she bought at wal-mart and it's connected to an h-p printer/scanner/copier gizmo she also bought at wal-mart. I ran the mandrake install wizard, and when it was finished I showed her the basics of using her new linux system by scanning a picture of her daughter using the gimp, retouching it to get rid of the scratches, and printing it. The only thing that didn't work was the POS lucent winmodem, which I resolved by setting her up with a new Motorola winmodem that has (proper) linux driver support from motorola.

        Lack of ability to do this universally is not a failure of linux - it's fucking amazing it even works as well as it does when you consider nearly every one of those drivers came from someone's individual dedication, not some corporate monkey's need for a weekly paycheck (although that noble volunteer may well be a corporate monkey by day). If you want better linux support for peripherals, get onto the folks at staples and tell them you need shit that works with linux. And when you find something supported by the manufacturer, make sure they know why you bought their product.

      • I gotta try this weed from Anonymous Smoker really ;-) (no ofense, just kidding)

        1. Easy installation of any Linux software. Don't give me RPM-hell, dependency hell, command-line compiling, proprietary click-n-run depositories, or any other excuses.

        Use a front end to RPM or .deb - No dependencies hell, no pain at all. In mandrake, Control Center -> Software Management. I just installed skype. It was even easier. I clicked on the link for the rpm on their webpage, which in turn launched the mandrake so

      • I agree that easy installation of software would be nice. However, that's not how most OSS software is designed.

        Because it's GPL or whatever, most linux software uses a ton of libraries and other software to operate. Unlike in a Windows environment where each company has to pretty much re-invent the wheel every time, and package up their own (or leased) software to make their package run. Not to mention, Windows itself is a big "distribution" - it includes a lot of libraries and API's.

        Because of thi
      • 1. Easy installation of any Linux software. Don't give me RPM-hell, dependency hell, command-line compiling, proprietary click-n-run depositories, or any other excuses. Only the Mac does it right: you drag the icon to your Applications folder. Voilà. The first distro to accomplish this will be king.

        Zero-install does exactly that. http://zero-install.sf.net/ [sf.net]

        • That's great for people who don't mind downloading applications, but what about people with slow/metered/no internet connections?

          Yes, I understand that it caches the app after the first download, but what if that first download is impossible or impractical?
          • AppDirs can be distributed on CD-ROM and retain the same property of "just drag this wherever and run it."

            Anyway, people need to get software somehow; it can't just magically appear on their computers. That's not anything specific to zero-install or any other package management solution, so your objection doesn't seem very relevant.

      • 1. I can give you this, but as others have pointed out, it's the nature of the beast. You aren't going to get a solution that everyone likes. Personally, the Mac way drives me nuts.

        2. This is FUD. It gives you more than one place because more than one program has been written to configure the same thing. Use whichever you'd like. Windows XP lets you get to the printer configuration at least four ways I can think of. Control Panel, Start->Printers, File->Print->Properties, System Tray->Pr
    • >Most everyone is going to use Linux in another 10 years...

      I'd settle for half in 5 years. Then people wouldn't be able to say: "Everybody uses IE".

      On an aside, when I hear that, I say "Oh, you mean IE uses everybody?" It's good for a chuckle...

      Totalitarian governments, being paranoid, really want linux so no US govt interference.

  • Too Funny (Score:1, Interesting)

    by Anonymous Coward
    There's a Google text ad next to the article on linuxforums for the following:
    Linux Comparison

    Get The Facts: Windows vs. Linux.
    Read The Independent Analysis Now.
    www.microsoft.com
    So let me get this right: if I click on the ad linuxforums gets a dollar or so from Google via MS? The only thing better would be a SCO ad.

    Time to throw an extra angle on the /. effect. =)

  • Slashdotted... (Score:3, Insightful)

    by dan_sdot (721837) on Tuesday September 21, 2004 @09:01PM (#10314939)
    Wow. The yoper site is already slashdotted. You would think that they would try to beef up their site before putting it on Slashdot. Where do they think they are going to get most of their users?
    I don't think that this is leaving a very good impression.
  • by superrcat (815508) on Tuesday September 21, 2004 @09:15PM (#10315027)
    with them ripping off icons and interface cues from Mac OS X. I wonder how much longer their site will be around seeing that they are running a trial version of IPB Portal. Let me pull out my venture capitalist checkbook!
  • Yoper Again? (Score:1, Interesting)

    by Anonymous Coward
    Considering that the Yoper people have already told us what they think of us and that we are not their target market, I'm not sure why we're discussing Yoper again...

    yoper (site admin): Why bother to be a rude and brainless chicken. Stay away. We do not need you. It might not be Your OS. This is freedom of choice. We convert businesses. We save businesses. You are obviously not a business or in any way our target market. We are a business.

    We compiled, tested, packaged, compiled, tested, packaged, compi

    • Everytime there is a a /. article about Yoper, you post the same basic message. I don't know who did what to hurt you, but don't you think it's time to grow up and move on?
  • bittorrent (Score:1, Informative)

    by Anonymous Coward
    http://apt.yoper.com/torrent/yoper.torrent
  • So its Your Operating System,.. Here I was thinking it was Yet Another Operating System...
  • I downloaded and have been using Yoper, however, in finally getting my dual monitor support working, I found a new problem:

    Whenever I play a video (or visualization in Xine, for that matter), it
    shows up, well, squished. Even the 'Xine' logo displays itself wrong.
    That is, to say, that all of my videos are essentially only half as
    high as they are supposed to be. It's taking my 4x3 videos and
    essentially making them 16x9... and my 16x9 videos... well,
    ultra-anamorphic.

    Even if I switch to full screen mode, ever
  • Our own worst enemy (Score:2, Interesting)

    by thunderpaws (199100)
    I find Yoper to be a great step in the advancement of Linux. Yoper, Linspire, Mandrake, and others I'm sure are marketing Linux distros that are easy for Windows users to install, use, and upgrade. Andreas has done an outstanding job and should be applauded. I have been very pleased that my wife and some friends are now happily using Yoper and are now free of the horrible frustrations that are Windows. Linux is about choice, and having fine choices such as Yoper for average home computer users should b
  • Fuckwit (Score:2, Informative)

    by Anonymous Coward
    Either the interviewer or the Andreas guy is a stupid fuckwit.

    1. Stripping does not improve runtime performance. Load performance is only marginally affected. Since the debugging data and comment crap is not used unless you are....DEBUGGING.. it doesn't have any effect on runtime performance. Because, Linux is demand paged, usually the pages of debugging crap won't even get into memory. Now, stripping might still be a good idea if a) you don't care about what you are stripping b) you don't want to waste se
  • Personal Mission (Score:5, Insightful)

    by BillsPetMonkey (654200) on Wednesday September 22, 2004 @02:37AM (#10316546)
    my personal mission in life, which is to unseat the Microsoft monopoly.

    So it's not to make a grat Linux distro then?

    Shame.
    • Re:Personal Mission (Score:3, Interesting)

      by dfj225 (587560)
      I don't know why so many people make it their mission to defeat Microsoft. I think it sounds really bad when you are asked about your operating system that you are developing and you start spouting off about how Microsoft is evil and they need to fall. To me, it seems childish. If you think Microsoft is evil, thats fine. If you use that as inner motivation to work a full time job, then come home and make a free linux distro, even better because I could probably never do something like that. However, ju

"Even if you're on the right track, you'll get run over if you just sit there." -- Will Rogers

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