Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Technology

10 Technologies MIA 698

Posted by Zonk
from the way-of-the-dodo dept.
Fantasy Football writes "CNet lists ten technologies they miss, which includes Napster, the originial Palm Pilot, good keyboards, and more. From the article: 'Technology evolves. Good technologies and products usually survive; poor ones usually go extinct. But not all of the technologies and tech products that have swirled down the drain of the tech gene pool deserved their fate. Here are some big, and some small, ideas that we thought we'd have with us forever, but that unfortunately have gone the way of the dodo.'"
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

10 Technologies MIA

Comments Filter:
  • by thegoogler (792786) on Monday August 08, 2005 @01:57AM (#13267339)
    i dont get all the love for kozmo, its like saying "and i want a perpeptual motion machine that makes infinite money too!, AND A PONEY."

    there buisness model was fatally flawed, they didnt make any proffit because they basically sold everything at what it cost them, and didnt charge shipping.

    • by jericho4.0 (565125) on Monday August 08, 2005 @02:00AM (#13267357)
      You don't get what's to like about a company that sold everything at cost and didn't charge for shipping?
    • Well, we didn't like Kosmo because they made money, we liked it because they delivered stuff to us, and because they basically sold everything at what it cost them and didn't charge shipping!
    • So? (Score:3, Interesting)

      by Sycraft-fu (314770)
      That doesn't mean that it wsan't a bitching service. I mean to-your-door delivery is awesome, but it's hard to get on almost anything but pizza. Plenty of times when I've wanted something, but not wanted to get dressed and go to the store to get it. Even more so when you are talking about things outside of normal business hours.

      That is was a bas business idea doesn't make it any less cool to the consumer. I wish they had found a way to make it work because I tell ya, I could go for a new DVD right now, but
      • Re:So? (Score:3, Interesting)

        by bentcd (690786)
        In my corner of the world, pizza joints have been offering film deals for some time now. You'll order pizza and DVD and it'll get delivered to your door. It would surprise me if this wasn't happening elsewhere too ...
    • by maxpublic (450413) on Monday August 08, 2005 @02:48AM (#13267518) Homepage
      Kozmo could only work in an arcology setting, and only then if the service charge were added in some fashion, e.g., as part of the rent. Although I can see this as being a very big incentive to move into an arcology, having everything from groceries to movie rentals delivered right to your door. The young forward-thinking geek could move into a much larger and more socially acceptable version of his parents basement while at the same time claiming that he's part of the 'wave of the future', rather than just being afraid of sunlight and face-to-face contact with other human beings.

      Max
      • > Kozmo could only work in an arcology setting, and only then if the service charge were added in some fashion, e.g., as part of the rent.

        Dude, they're called concierges.
    • Not really correct (Score:4, Informative)

      by beavis88 (25983) on Monday August 08, 2005 @09:22AM (#13268750)
      Kozmo started charging for delivery on orders under $30 at least a year or so before they went under.

      Further, they were turning a profit in both Boston and New York -- both very dense cities where deliveries were easily made via bicycle. Not so in some of their later expansions (Dallas comes to mind).
    • by R2.0 (532027) on Monday August 08, 2005 @09:37AM (#13268831)
      I remember hearing one of those "audio diaries" on NPR by someone who worked at Kozmo. She had just graduated college with some arts degree, and her job was bicycle delivery in. She was paid over $30k/year and made, on average, 2 deliveries a day, and spent the rest of the time sitting in the warehouse chatting with the other messengers.

      When the company collapsed, she despaired of ever finding a job as good as that one, and decided to go to grad school - also in whatever major she had in undergrad (and couldn't find a job with).

      Never in my life have I so wished to have the power to disobey the laws of physics, just in order to be able to reach through the radio and slap that stupid bitch silly. She should have been doing backflips, rejoicing that the whole scheme lasted so long, instead of moaning about how unfair life was.

      (Didnt' help that I was stuck in Beltway traffic in summer with no A/C when listening.)
  • Keyboard (Score:3, Informative)

    by seanadams.com (463190) * on Monday August 08, 2005 @01:58AM (#13267340) Homepage
    You can still buy [pckeyboard.com] a real keyboard. Those guys bought the design from IBM and still produce it in the USA.

    I like the feel of an old Antec clicky keyboard better, but the layout on the Unicomp is better.

    Get a PS2USB adaptor and it even works great on a Mac.
    • Re:Keyboard (Score:2, Funny)

      by Anonymous Coward
      Uh, that's what it says in the article. THANKS FOR THE TIP
    • Re:Keyboard (Score:3, Interesting)

      by log2.0 (674840)
      That is awesome. I have been wanting a no-frills no-media keys NORMAL keyboard.

      Those MS keyboards are sooo stupid. They decided to group the F-keys in groups of 3 rather than 4, the delete key is twice as big as it should be and i HATE it when I go to press insert and I click Print Screen instead...GRRR

      Ahh, that's my rant for today :)
    • Re:Keyboard (Score:4, Funny)

      by Fastball (91927) on Monday August 08, 2005 @03:19AM (#13267615) Journal
      Kinda like the robotic arm and processor that Cyberdyne Systems were working on in T2, huh? You know what this means don't you?

      I'm gonna have to get a Harley, some leather duds, and a tough pair of shades and blow up the pckeyboard.com offices. I HATE THOSE KEYBOARDS! THEY MUST BE STOPPED! The IBM M-series keyboard can't be reasoned with. It can't be bartered with. And it won't stop until my eardrums are dead. TA-TING!

      A couple years working in a university computer lab surrounded by those things almost broke my will to live, but there was a co-worker who taught me how to survive it.

      His name was Conner. John Conner.
  • RIP (Score:5, Funny)

    by Anonymous Coward on Monday August 08, 2005 @01:58AM (#13267344)
    Microsoft BOB [toastytech.com]
    *Sniff*
    • Re:RIP (Score:2, Informative)

      by dagr8tim (866860)
      I had never heard of bob until now. But looking at the screen shots reminds me of the Navagator [computerhope.com] for Packard Bell.

      It did basically the same thing for windows 3.1(1). That was the main I hated to do a factory restore on that computer. You had to manually remove the damned program after you were done.

    • Re:RIP (Score:4, Interesting)

      by SeventyBang (858415) on Monday August 08, 2005 @07:49AM (#13268311)


      Try Microsoft Bob. Or did you mean your Battery Operated Boyfriend?

      I have yet to figure out why the technical field overuses 's for pluralization, 's for pronoun possession, and the mystery acronyms (see: scud - not SCUD - missles during the Gulf War) - just because a word is unfamiliar to you doesn't mean it's an acronym.

      As more and more people are learning this tidbit of information, making it less & less arcane Microsoft trivia, the product manager for Microsoft Bob was Melinda French. You know her now as... Mrs. William Henry Gates III.
  • Again? (Score:4, Funny)

    by Alphanos (596595) on Monday August 08, 2005 @01:59AM (#13267349)
    Wow, it sounds like CNet must have pretty poor editorial standards to post another article with an identical subject so soon after their last one.
  • by starseeker (141897) * on Monday August 08, 2005 @02:03AM (#13267372) Homepage
    Space is essentially the only frontier we have left, and I think humanity needs a frontier. The Earth is fully populated now, in the sense that only the very remotest regions remain unexplored and all regions are claimed.

    Practical is good and all, but if we wait until we solve all our problems here on Earth first we'll be stuck on this dirtball until the sun hits Red Giant phase. Human nature being what it is.

    I say Let's Get Out There! Now! It pushes limits, it's positive, and it pushes technology. Sounds good to me! May China can provoke another space race - I sure hope so. One-upmanship seems to be the only real way to get any serious funding :-(.
    • by QuantumG (50515) <qg@biodome.org> on Monday August 08, 2005 @02:29AM (#13267460) Homepage Journal
      I prefer to put it another way. If you're not for space exploration they you must be for a conservation of resources. That is, you must be for a scaling back of population growth on earth and per capita energy consumption. This is just obvious. If the population of the earth keeps growing we won't have enough resources to maintain our current level of living conditions. Studies of population have shown that as the affluence of the society increases, the birth rate slows to match the death rate and population stablises. Or to put it less tactfully: poor people breed faster than rich people. So if you consider the earth as a closed system you have to either raise the standard of living around the world to a level where population growth ceases "naturally" or you have to commit the resources of the rich into forcing the poor not to breed. Would anyone care to guess which is more likely? Right, so if we're willing to agree that considering the earth as a closed system leads to the logical conclusion that the world population growth must be controlled by force, then I can sum up your two options right now..

      You are either for the expansion of growth of the human population off the earth and into space or you are for mass murder and restricted personal liberty to control population growth here on earth.

      Personally I don't think there's a choice. We must expand into space. Of course, there's also the third option. The so called what, me worry? approach. Which is to just pop your hands over your ears and sing "lalalalalala" and hope the whole issue will go away. Thing is, we can afford to do this, but chances are that the next generation won't.

      • by Brandybuck (704397) on Monday August 08, 2005 @03:01AM (#13267557) Homepage Journal
        I can sum up your two options right now

        There are many more choices than that, simply do to the fact you've made them ridiculously simplistic. Here's another huge broad choice: it's not my choice to make! If people want to move off the planet, more power to them! This isn't a "what, me worry" answer, it's an answer that says I'm not going to be a tyrant and impose my opinions upon others. Personally I am against the government space monopoly, but that doesn't mean I am against space exploration. Quite the opposite.

        In addition, your alternative to expansion is incomplete as well. It assumes only tyranny or anarchy can control populations. But there's an alternative even you touch upon: if rich people breed less than poor people, let's get rid of poverty.
        • In addition, your alternative to expansion is incomplete as well. It assumes only tyranny or anarchy can control populations. But there's an alternative even you touch upon: if rich people breed less than poor people, let's get rid of poverty.

          There is a choice all the way up until we hit a certain equilibrium point, the choices made then will determine if we go into one of those two directions, and the grandparent is right, eventually it has to be growth into space or tight tight population controls. There
      • by maxpublic (450413) on Monday August 08, 2005 @03:02AM (#13267563) Homepage
        If the population of the earth keeps growing we won't have enough resources to maintain our current level of living conditions.

        While the Earth still has a positive growth rate, that rate has been in decline ever since a certain piece of trash called "The Population Bomb" hit the shelves. If the decline continues we'll hit an equilibrium population of around eight billion when all is said and done. Note that according to the doomsayers who first started whining about population we were supposed to have in excess of eight billion people by the year 2000; it never happened because they didn't bothered to check their facts, which even then indicated that the rate was in decline.

        I find it rather interesting that people who still complain about Earth being "overpopulated" fail to mention the declining growth rate, nor the fact that every single prediction they made from the '60's right up to the present has been dead wrong.

        As far as the resource argument goes, this only applies if you assume that technological advancement freezes at its current level and never, ever progresses again. Quite clearly that isn't going to happen.

        So if you consider the earth as a closed system you have to either raise the standard of living around the world to a level where population growth ceases "naturally" or you have to commit the resources of the rich into forcing the poor not to breed.

        The first may eventually happen through technological advancement; the second never will unless you manage to enslave the Earth to a dictatorial one-world government. And so long as folks like me are around, anyone who tries to enforce breeding limits on their fellow citizens will find themselves the subject of a post-natal abortion right quick.

        Right, so if we're willing to agree that considering the earth as a closed system leads to the logical conclusion that the world population growth must be controlled by force

        We aren't willing to agree. You'll never get a majority of Americans - or anything other than a tiny, tiny minority, I suspect - to agree with your assessment.

        We must expand into space.

        Settling space is a non-viable population control method. It may be useful for increasing the resource wealth of the Earth itself (your first option - make everyone rich) but no significant portion of the population will ever move off-world. In fact, it'd be a complete waste of resources to even try.

        Max
        • While the Earth still has a positive growth rate, that rate has been in decline ever since a certain piece of trash called "The Population Bomb" hit the shelves.

          Hmm, I guess people read it and realized they'd better stop having so many kids? ;^)

          I find it rather interesting that people who still complain about Earth being "overpopulated" fail to mention the declining growth rate.

          That's a bit of a non-sequiter, isn't it? If the Earth is overpopulated, even a zero growth rate wouldn't change that fact. You'd

          • by maxpublic (450413) on Monday August 08, 2005 @04:52AM (#13267886) Homepage
            That's a bit of a non-sequiter, isn't it? If the Earth is overpopulated, even a zero growth rate wouldn't change that fact.

            What the alarmists fail to acknowledge is that they don't get to decide at what point the Earth is "overpopulated". I don't think the Earth is overpopulated at the moment, nor will it be if we reach eight billion. My opinion is just as valid (or invalid) as any alarmist figure.

            You'd need a negative growth rate in order to shrink the population back to less than the maximum sustainable size.

            Every single analysis of 'sustainability' by the folks preaching doom and gloom over the Earth's carrying capacity assumes that *technology will never advance beyond what we have now*. It's not only stupid to think such a thing, it's deliberately deceptive. Not that this is a new development among the population control advocates - they've been doing the exact same thing since the beginning of the 20th century! And they've been absolutely, one-hundred percent, dead wrong.

            Based on their complete and utter failure to accurate predict anything when it comes to population and resource development, much less technological innovation, I see no reason to heed the alarmists now any more than I should if the year were 1900.

            Max
            • "What the alarmists fail to acknowledge is that they don't get to decide at what point the Earth is "overpopulated". I don't think the Earth is overpopulated at the moment, nor will it be if we reach eight billion. My opinion is just as valid (or invalid) as any alarmist figure."

              If by "valid" you mean "I can make whatever mouth noises I want", then you're right. However, if by "valid" you mean "accurately reflects reality", then no, your opinion isn't necessarily as valid... its validity will depend on its
      • by XNormal (8617)
        I prefer to put it another way. If you're not for space exploration they you must be for a conservation of resources.

        There are other alternatives. You can also be:
        • For short term profits. Period.
        • With no plans to have children
        • With plans to have children, but not care much about their future
        • Irrational.
        • I'm sure there's more.
      • by OldManAndTheC++ (723450) on Monday August 08, 2005 @06:28AM (#13268077)
        The idea of expanding into space is good for many reasons, but reducing population pressure is not one of them. The number of new persons born each year will easily outstrip any conceivable launch capability, even if there were somewhere for people to go.

        We must reduce population growth, and the best way to do that is to grant more political power to women, especially in developing countries (where in many cases, they are considered chattel). There's a good article on Wikipedia discussing the theory of demographic transition [wikipedia.org] and how it affects population, and how giving women more economic and political control naturally reduces the birth rate. Of course access to contraception and (gasp!) abortion is important as well.

        I agree that the "what, me worry?" approach will not help, and unfortunately that is the one adopted by most of our political leaders. No one wants to tell people to stop having kids. In a few countries with declining populations citizens are actually encouraged to accelerate the birth rate!

    • Space is essentially the only frontier we have left...

      The only external one, perhaps. The truly greatest frontier still wide open is the human mind. Going to Mars is a parlor trick compared to trying to figure out the intricacies of the brain. And there are more human benefits to it as well. Exploration of outer spaces is probably just a way to avoid exploration of the truly terrifying inner spaces. But that's human nature I guess. The answer is always "out there" somewhere.

      • The truly greatest frontier still wide open is the human mind.

        You took the words right out of my mouth. It isn't just the brain -- it's the brain's emergent properties, and the emergent properties of gathering so many brains together that are poorly understood.

        A lot depends, I guess, on what you insist should be taken as given. To some people questions like, "How did the planets form?" and "How did life arise?", and "is there other intelligent life out there?" are not only uninteresting, but are positiviely
    • by Zaffle (13798) on Monday August 08, 2005 @02:56AM (#13267538) Homepage Journal

      Space is essentially the only frontier we have left, and I think humanity needs a frontier. The Earth is fully populated now, in the sense that only the very remotest regions remain unexplored and all regions are claimed.

      You must be kidding! There is a vast expanse that has only been touch upon, only a bit more than space itself. Undersea oceans and ocean floors. These vast, and relativily unexplored plains offer mountains and valleys that you only ever see on other planets.

      The technology to truely explore them is perhaps even more difficult that space, and its in our own backyard.

      • Undersea oceans and ocean floors.

        Where I come from, we keep our oceans alongside our seas. None of this fancy layers of ocean and sea stacked up like a pile of pancakes. That's just ostentatious, that is.
    • Space is essentially the only frontier we have left, and I think humanity needs a frontier.

      How about the deep sea? We haven't explored most of it... and it's practically in our backyard. Where are our Abyss-like underwater research labs, underwater homes [sub-find.com], etc.? How many species of ocean life are we totally unaware of?
       
  • by starseeker (141897) * on Monday August 08, 2005 @02:07AM (#13267390) Homepage
    EV1 was never workable - the battery weight and expense, combined with limited range, made it Not Practical as a mass market car from day one.

    Gotta love the bit about recalling and destroying the cars due to liability concerns. Thank you US legal system. We really ought to outlaw innovation, exploration, and all that stuff - it's too dangerous. Can let people run risks - heaven forbid.
    • It was perfectly practable for a commuter car.
      battery expense ammortized over 5 years (expected lifespan) yeilded a cost only slightly higher than gas prices of the time (by a few hundred dollars). With fuel costs expected to rise (which they have) the crossover point for the battery pack is 2.5-3 years.
      -nB
    • dude, this is the modus-operandi of the automotive world.

      Back in the 70's GM made several hundred cars with a turbine engine. they were quiet, powerful and worked like a dream to the few that were allowed to drive them through an extended test run. they recalled all of them and had them all destroyed. due to the "bullshit" reasons as quoted about the EV1. The truth is that the car maker did not want any of them getting in the hands of competition that had competent management that could make the product w
  • Manned space exploration
    I am of the opinion that sending humans into space is the most effective use of our "space dollars". It is fine to send up robots to collect data samples, but we also need to know the safest and cheapest way to package up live astronauts, drive them around the solar system, and bring them home safely. With the current shuttle tech, we are looking at neither the safest, nor the cheapest way of sending up live astronauts and bringing them home extra crispy. There are a lot of barrie
    • LPs
      This will continue to be a niche format. CDs provide the same quality sound playback for the human-audible range of sound.

      Actually, they provide better quality playback for the human-audible range, because they have much lower noise.

      I imagine that it might be useful if you were a dog and had to listen to ultrasonic music, otherwise... not useful.

      While it's true that CDs cut off sharply above 20 kHz and thus can't produce ultrasonics at all, it's a misconception that LPs don't also have hig

    • by zakezuke (229119) on Monday August 08, 2005 @03:20AM (#13267617)
      Good keyboards
      There are plenty of good keyboards, Microsoft even makes some good ones. What they are asking for are those loud IBM keyboards that feel like the clumsy typewriters they were adapted from.


      Microsoft makes some good ones? I've oned one MS natural and one MS natural elite, but both died due to the contacts wearing out.

      While the IBM clicky keyboard (can't remember the model number off hand) might not be your bag IIRC they used metal on metal contacts basicly looking like tweesers inside the key hole.. where the pressing down action caused the contacts to meet and behold a key press is registered. Dec keyboards I believe are made in much the same way though i'd have to check mine... but you phone up support if you dumped coffee in your keyboard and they tell you to put it in a bucket full of soap and water and let dry, and most of the time the problem was resolved.

      The current keyboard trend is circuit traces on one membrain, a seperator, and a membrain with a solid contact spot. They are cheap, easy to mass produce, and rub away after a couple of years. I mean it "nice" not having to spend $50 to $100 on a keyboard, but those who spent $50 to $100 on a keyboard likely have something that can still be used today.

      There was a time when the keyboards were made by using a large PC board with basic contacts, with a flexable bubble material on top with a little metal contact. While these will eventually wear away, they don't do so nearly as quickly as plastic membrains.
  • Best keyboard I've run across lately is the Matias Tactile Pro [tactilepro.com]. Designed for a Mac, but works great on a PC/Linux machine as well (I'm on one right now, hooked to a KVM that has both a Windows system and a Mac mini on it).
  • It's getting more difficult to find keyboards without "extra features" (also called programmable buttons). And I've yet to find a quality wireless keyboard (radio) that is slim and lacking these "extra features".

    Does anyone know of any slim, wireless keyboards?
  • Could have saved us from losing most of the good technologies, and is the prime technological loss to trump them all.
  • I recently read M o o n r u s h [thespacereview.com]. The renouned commercial spaceflight author Dennis Wingo makes the argument that for a $20 billion investment humans could return to the Moon perminately, mine precious metals needed to kickstart the hydrogen economy and eventually turn a profit. That much investment includes all the launches and all the equipment needed. Of course, it won't happen with some angel investor handing over that much capital at once with some vague hope of a return on investment. No, the way i
  • I want my PC version of the space cadet keyboard, ding nabbit! Complete with absurdly overbuild mechanical durability and enough shift keys to fly an airplane with! It's not quite a mind meld with your computer but it's more or less the next best thing ;-).

    I lucked into an old IBM keyboard, and it will undoubtedly outlive the rest of my computer. Why the heck is there no market for durable goods any more? Or rather, why won't anyone MAKE durable goods? Has pride in workmanship given over entirely to ne
    • durable goods (Score:3, Insightful)

      by j1m+5n0w (749199)
      Or rather, why won't anyone MAKE durable goods?
      Because, for the most part, a consumer can't tell the difference between a durable product and a non-durable product until well after they've bought it. See The Market for Lemons [wikipedia.org] and/or for some insight into what happens to a market when buyers can't distinguish between high and low quality products.
  • Huh? (Score:3, Insightful)

    by Jeremi (14640) on Monday August 08, 2005 @02:15AM (#13267427) Homepage
    the last people to explore the final frontier are past retirement age--and so are the engineers who put them there. In other words, next time we go into space, we're going to have to retrain people from scratch. There may be no firsthand knowledge of what it's like to be in space or to build a space vehicle


    Not to be a curmudgeon, but there is a Space Shuttle in orbit as I type this text. I'm pretty sure its occupants know "what it's like to be in space".


    OTOH, I think manned space travel is going to remain an expensive novelty until we can massively improve our dollars-per-kilogram-to-orbit. And that will require either some revolutionary breakthrough in rocket science (doubtful), or a space elevator or some other alternative means of getting mass to orbit. Until one of those things happens, unmanned probes and more basic research on the "get mass out of Earth's gravity well" problem are the smart way to go.

  • Erm. I used to have one of the original. It was okay, but I don't miss it. I liked its simplicity and its battery life. Heck, I even liked all the 3rd party apps out there. But my big beef with it was in giving it something uesful to do. Eventually I settled on AvantGo and Dope Wars. That was kinda neat... but .. meh.

    Okay, this is just me, but I really didn't find a use for PDAs until they started coming with wifi built in and support for ginormous memory cards. Heck, I played with a Palm the other
  • by corsec67 (627446) on Monday August 08, 2005 @02:21AM (#13267441) Homepage Journal
    On the first computer I used, a TRS-80 Model 100, the Control key is next to the A button, and the caps lock is a tiny button to the bottom right of the keyboard.

    How often does Caps Lock get used relative to Ctrl? Why was it moved? Even in Windows, copy, cut and paste use Ctrl.

    http://store.yahoo.com/pfuca-store/haphackeylit1.h tml [yahoo.com]
    These keyboard look ok, but they don't sell a split egronomic version.

    I can map my keyboard, with xmodmap on linux, but it is hard to do that on a per user basis on a windows box, and I definitly can't do that on the windows boxes at school.
  • My take on the list (Score:5, Interesting)

    by Kymermosst (33885) on Monday August 08, 2005 @02:29AM (#13267459) Journal
    1. Manned Space Exploration

    Well, I agree that reestablishing travel to the moon and beyond is important, the International Space Station is an important stepping stone that deserves focus. The reason I think so is that I truly believe it's going to take a multinational effort to get to Mars and back.

    2. Kozmo.com

    Make up your mind, CNET, technology you miss, or giant flop [cnet.com]. I suppose it could be both, but even if Kozmo had stayed in business, it could never compete with my neighborhood grocery store.

    3. Napster

    Any opinion I might express about this would likely start a flame war, so I'll leave this one alone.

    4. Concorde

    You can't really miss what even yourselves admit was out of reach to almost everyone. I don't seem to miss it at all. How do you miss something you never really had?

    5. GM's EV1

    Zero Emission Vehicle. ROFLMAO. Zero-emission as long as you don't count the power plant that burned (coal|oil|gas|atomic nuclei) and polluted somone else's back yard. Sure, I suppose the power could have been photoelectric or wind produced, but if you believe no harm to the earth was done in the process of manufacturing those systems, you're clueless. (Hint: Strip mining for metals, processing ore, smelting, doping chemicals for solar, etc). Not that I have a problem with any of the above, but let's be realistic here. There's no such thing as a "Zero Emission Vehicle".

    6. The Original Palm Pilot

    I don't know. My Zire 31 does everything the original did, plus color and MP3s. I've been eying the Tungsten E2 as an upgrade. Only third party apps have ever crashed it, and that's only twice after over a year of use. The Palm-supplied apps have been rock solid. A lot like the original Palm Pilot.

    7. Good Keyboards

    Agreed.

    8. Wires

    You miss wires? Uh, you made the choice to go wireless. If you truly miss wires, just switch back, right? It's not like your old phone company disappeared, and you can't buy ethernet cables. Oh wait... the convenience outweighs the disadvantages of wireless you point to. I guess you don't really miss wires after all.

    9. LPs

    My wife is an archaeologist. She's told me about digging these up.

    10. The Newton

    The Newton was good for a laugh, but it was also a good lesson for future manufacturers of PDAs. Without Apple's failure, would we really have seen Palm's success?
    • by dbIII (701233) on Monday August 08, 2005 @03:55AM (#13267737)
      There's no such thing as a "Zero Emission Vehicle"
      Of course there is - it means zero emission from the vehicle, emission happens elsewhere. It isn't the way to cut down on energy consumption or CO2 emission, it's a way to not have CO, NOx or SOx where people are breathing it. The first hybrid car I saw in 1987 was for this purpose - above ground at a mine site it ran on fuel and below ground it ran on batteries - no emissions when it mattered.

      From what I've read the zero emissions policy was at first a reaction to unbelievable amounts of pollution from automobiles in L.A. - any other slant that was put on it after that was people playing politics and the nuclear lobby trying to get green credibility (and possibly succeeding).

    • There's no such thing as a "Zero Emission Vehicle".

      Wrong [vikingship.org].
    • by MythMoth (73648) on Monday August 08, 2005 @09:19AM (#13268729) Homepage
      Concorde

      You can't really miss what even yourselves admit was out of reach to almost everyone. I don't seem to miss it at all. How do you miss something you never really had?


      I agree with their attitude in the article - this was something to aspire to. It was very expensive, but not so expensive that it was unimaginable as a once-in-a-lifetime possibility.

      I miss it for exactly that reason. Plus I used to work at Heathrow and have nostalgic memories of everyone checking their watches as the 11am BA001 flight roared past the window.
  • Internet... (Score:5, Insightful)

    by gmuslera (3436) on Monday August 08, 2005 @02:40AM (#13267492) Homepage Journal
    ... as in:
    * Spamless Internet
    * Virusless Internet
    * Popupless Internet
    * Bannerless Internet
    * etcless Internet

    Of course that the net has evolved, and a lot, but sometimes one miss those old days when your mail were mail, when browsing pages retrieved almost only the content you wanted, and even the pages were really static, without things popping up, moving, blinking or weighting far more than the useful content of what you really want to read.
  • by Dahamma (304068) on Monday August 08, 2005 @02:42AM (#13267497)
    Yeah, CNET is having a top 10 celebration for its 10th aniversary... can we just point everyone to it rather than having to make each one a new article!?

    http://www.cnet.com/4520-11136_1-6250162-1.html?ta g=bottom [cnet.com]
  • by Guru Goo (875426) on Monday August 08, 2005 @03:04AM (#13267573)
    The handshake noise of dial-up modems.
  • by Nymz (905908) on Monday August 08, 2005 @03:25AM (#13267628) Journal
    It seems to me that fewer manned space trips is actually a boon for us technologists.

    Sending humans that weren't designed for, or evolved to, going into outer space is inefficient and costly when compared to specific tools that humans have created and are continuing to improve upon.

    Let's compare what we could lose against what we could gain. Gone will be photo opportunities, of one man in a space suit, planting a flag on another planet, as seen in the article. Gained will be 'spin-offs', from research and developement efforts, that will come from advancements in robotics and artificial intelligence systems, because remote control over such great (time) distances is simply not feasable.

    I don't know about you, but I'd rather be a unsung computer science nerd, than a glorified trained monkey in space. :-)

    Do not think that I'm belittling the efforts of those that made significant contributions to our space programs in the past. But, as we gain the capability to explore safer, better, and cheaper, then we also have the responsibility to set aside our old pride (photo of man next to flag) for new pride (photo of man next to robot).
  • Decent Keyboards (Score:3, Interesting)

    by Anonymous Coward on Monday August 08, 2005 @03:31AM (#13267652)
    I have an original IBM PS2 keyboard (on which i am typing this) and its just not equalled by anything else i've ever used. Sad really - its dated 1984, weighs more than the Shuttle its plugged into, and you could beat your boss to death with it, wipe off the blood and it'll still work perfectly.

    Hmm, i now start to see why they changed them...
  • by Simonetta (207550) on Monday August 08, 2005 @03:42AM (#13267698)
    Having grown up in the LP era and spent large amounts of hard-earned lawn mowing and snow-shovelling money on them, I can honestly say about them "Good Riddance!".

        They are primitive sound technology. They are expensive, fragile, and don't sound good. You can always tell an MP3 file of an old 60's pop song made from an LP as opposed to one ripped from a CD. The fidelity is just not there.

        An LP held 45 minutes of music for most of its life and about 60 minutes at its most advanced. It cost about $20 (in today's US dollars). Now a blank DVD ROM holds about 4000 minutes in high-quality MP3 or OGG files and sells for $0.39 (in today's US dollars). An exact copy of this set of 4500 minutes can be made on another 39 cent blank disk in about 15 minutes. And you can control which selections will be copied and the order.

        To get ultra high fidelity audio from LPs requires thousands of dollars of precision equipment, very fragile and sensitive to the local room conditions. To get the same fidelity from high quality 320kbps MP3 and OGG files takes a $59 player. And it even puts out this high fidelity sound when you are running with it.

        And some silly people want to go back to LP?
    • by jdonnis (115371) on Monday August 08, 2005 @04:32AM (#13267841)
      Try listening to a 10 year old mildly scratched LP.
      Then try listening to a 10 year old mildly scratched CD.

      The first will be tolerable, the second will drive you to murder.
      • "Try listening to a 10 year old mildly scratched LP.
        Then try listening to a 10 year old mildly scratched CD."

        That's funny, because a mildly scratched CD plays fine. CDs have error correction that is quite strong, so minor scratches aren't an issue.

        Now, you can't take a knife to a CD and expect it to play properly. But you can't do that to an LP either.

        You can drill holes in CDs, though, and they still play. Mostly.
      • What, are you kidding me? I have a lot of mildly scratched CDs, they all work just fine. Now I have some severely scratched ones that have problems but guess what? A severly scratched record is worse, hell it often won't even track. Further, the CDs are fixable. There's a shop here that for abut a dollar will resurface a CD. Basically they just grind it down to get rid fo the scratches and then polish it smooth. Works great. Limited amount of times out can do it, of course, but you can't do that with LP.

        Teh
      • The first will be tolerable, the second will drive you to murder.

        It will drive you to mu-mu-mu-mu-mu-mu-mu *click* r-de-de-de-de-de-de-de-de....

        :-)

        Seriously, though, the big thing that CD's did is equalize the market.

        A cheap CD player will do almost as good of a job at playing a CD as an expensive one will do. The incentive for going to a $1000 CD player versus a $30 CD player is a very small gain in sound quality. CD players also, essentially, require no maintenance, whereas you need to periodi

    • by Andy_R (114137) on Monday August 08, 2005 @05:25AM (#13267954) Homepage Journal
      I have a lot of nostalgia for vinyl - partly because you did have to care for the discs, which meant the pop stars you worshiped as a teenager had their own little audio shrine in your house, but mostly because you got at least 2 square feet of artwork on the sleeves. A band can't fit much of an 'image' on a CD inlay, so image-building has to be done by video, which places too much emphasis on the looks of the perfomers. Ulgy musicians can't be effortlessly cool anymore.
    • An LP held 45 minutes of music for most of its life and about 60 minutes at its most advanced. It cost about $20 (in today's US dollars). Now a blank DVD ROM holds about 4000 minutes in high-quality MP3 or OGG files and sells for $0.39 (in today's US dollars). An exact copy of this set of 4500 minutes can be made on another 39 cent blank disk in about 15 minutes. And you can control which selections will be copied and the order.

      And yet, none of the reduction in the price of production of a record shows up i
    • by madaxe42 (690151) on Monday August 08, 2005 @05:31AM (#13267971) Homepage
      You see when you're listening to a digital CD the sound comes out all like _|-|_|-|_|-|_ and it sounds terrible, but if you're listening to an analogue LP the sound is all like v^v^v^u^v^U^wooooOOOooo000ooo. So basically the sound quality is smoother and easier from an LP, and it's got all those extra harmonics and sounds, which come free! I mean, you don't get any pops and crackles on CD, and those give the music all their character. The beatles sound sterile and dead without the pops and crackles. I think we need to invest some serious research $$$ in a portable LP player, that you can use like an iPod, I mean, an iPod has what, 40Gb of storage, that's about 4000 minutes... So if you had some kind of barrel, with 40 LPs in it, and a player, and some gyroscopes, you could have that great L:P quality wherever you run. And you'll get fitter faster.

      But, anyway, back to my point. For things to sound good, you need an LP, some really thick cables, a gold plated power supply, some of those special bricks which go on top of cables, and a whole bunch of tetrodes & pentodes. Also, once, I saw the beatles in concert, they sucked - they were nothing like they are on an LP - I mean, between the lot of them they couldn't make a single crackle or pop, and they didn't skip once!!!! Where's the warmth?!?!?! Remember, it's w000oo000OOO000oooo))oo which is great not 101010101010101010111 all those ones sound terrible.
    • by Anonymous Coward on Monday August 08, 2005 @06:17AM (#13268056)

      Absolute codswallop, "thousands of dollars of precision equipment".

      For 200 quid (GBP) you can buy a decent turntable and probably a good stylus as well.

      Adjust your stylus and keep your records clean (the first should be easy for the average geek, the second might be slightly harder) and fidelity is superior to anything digital (and that includes the new high-end digital formats like DVD-audio according to tests in Hi-Fi Choice).

      There are things on "Dark Side of the Moon" LP (analog recording!) which I cannot even hear on my CD copy ... The only thing CDs do better is reproducing silence (a bunch of zeros is not that hard to do), but when it comes to producing sound analog is still the best. Don't mistake abscence of crackles for great sound ...

      I am sick of people who listen to their music through computer speakers and tinny MP3 players having opinions about analog.

      If you think spending 40 quid on a good soundcard and another 40 quid for some "good speakers for my PC" is what fidelity is about then you need to have your hearing checked out.

      • by poot_rootbeer (188613) on Monday August 08, 2005 @11:40AM (#13269900)
        If you think spending 40 quid on a good soundcard and another 40 quid for some "good speakers for my PC" is what fidelity is about then you need to have your hearing checked out.

        And if you think "fidelity" is what music appreciation is about then you need to have your brain checked.

        Play me a good song, and I won't care whether it's a 96kbps MP3 stream or pristine vinyl on a $2000 turntable -- I'm going to enjoy it. Likewise, play me a bad song and I'm NOT going to enjoy it, irregardless of "fidelity".
    • And some silly people want to go back to LP?

      Some people should definately invest in digital filters, one for the sound distortion, the other to add the appropriate amount of snap, crackle and hiss. It's all about good memories, either dreaming back to when you were young or just dreaming that you've gone back in time to when the LPs were hot. Digital perfection is simply counterproductive to the immersion. It's not about perfect reproduction, but consistent reproduction with the past.

      That is why there is no
  • by skingers6894 (816110) on Monday August 08, 2005 @03:45AM (#13267705)
    I really miss the days when a new computer release was really that. In the good old days before PC homogenization we used to get new and interesting computers released every month it seemed. I know, I know the PC industry had to mature and standards were required blah blah.

    It was fun though...
  • by Andy_R (114137) on Monday August 08, 2005 @05:14AM (#13267930) Homepage Journal
    1) Audiogalaxy. Wonderful as BitTorrent is, it's simply not as good for finding incredibly obscure music that only 3 people in the world are interested in.

    2) Games written in Basic. Oh for the glory days when any schoolkid could write from scratch something that his mates would be interested in playing.

    3) The 12" single. For the sleeves - CD singles are great, but I really miss getting a square foot of artwork thrown in for free.

    4) Booting from ROM. The Amiga started the rot, back in the old days you could turn a PC on and start to use it in seconds. Hard OSes were practically immune to piracy, and the 'it has to be right, we can't patch it' OS coding ethos has a lot going for it too!

    5) Trackballs. The mouse you don't need a pad for, perfect for laptops too, but we ended up smearing our fingers over horrible 'trackpads' instead - how did that happen?

    6) Analogue TV. Still hobbling on but it's days are numbered. My 30 years of compression-artefact-free viewing are already over.
    • i agree with audiogalaxy. an excellent service. i miss it greatly. recently tried iTunes, and was amazed at the lack of depth. the best thing about audiogalaxy was the detailed user reviews. it made me more informed with my CD purchases. i haven't bought a CD since it went down.

  • by tootlemonde (579170) on Monday August 08, 2005 @06:50AM (#13268143)
    1. Free news Web sites -- no payback ever emerged
    2. SUVs -- killed by $900/barrel oil
    3. Blogging -- turned out to be a fad
    4. "Satisfaction guaranteed or your money back" -- killed by scammers
    5. AOL -- the public wised up
    6. DVDs -- everything went online
    7. CRTs -- went the way of the LP
    8. VCRs -- went the way of the LP
    9. Movie theatres -- killed by rude audience behavior
    10. Slashdot -- killed by trolls and poseurs
  • HP calculators (Score:4, Interesting)

    by sita (71217) on Monday August 08, 2005 @06:58AM (#13268168)
    HP RPL calculators. Yes, they still make them, but it not exactly as if they evolved with time. Well, perhaps I don't miss them, since I haven't had much use for them since I left university, but still.

    HP calculators are (used to be) fine pieces of engineering. A few months ago I needed to calculate something and since there really isn't anything that compares to the HP RPL calculator interface I digged out my HP48 from a deskdrawer. I turned it on. The batteries had not drained! It must have been roughly ten years since I used it last. There was stuff lying around on the stack since I last used it.
  • by smchris (464899) on Monday August 08, 2005 @07:59AM (#13268348)
    It takes a while to figure out that progress isn't linear. As an older person, my favorite is the motor-driven analog clock radio.

    * It doesn't need a backup battery.

    * Unlike cheap clock radios without backup if the power goes out for a minute, it takes about 5 seconds to adjust the minute hand.

    * Ditto, if the power goes out. you aren't going to wake up for work two hours late unless the power is off for two hours.

    * If you want to get up later one day, you don't have to cycle 23 hours that evening to get the alarm back to the earlier time.

    * I just think analog is cool. It's a one-glance pictoral instead of digital information.

    * And the clock motors were 60-cycle syncro and perfectly accurate for all practical purposes.

    But, aside from the expense of being made of metal (back then), I imagine assembling a clock motor was labor intensive, right?

    I'm currently using a circa '68 Zenith that somebody gave me around '98 because the AF power transistor had thermal runaway. An easy diagnosis and an equally easy fix with a circuit board of discrete components. A little light grease on the clock gears every few years and it's good to go.

  • All ten on one page! (Score:4, Interesting)

    by PhotoGuy (189467) on Monday August 08, 2005 @08:27AM (#13268466) Homepage
    Top tech I miss, is people putting top ten lists all on one page, rather than having to click "continue" ten times. Congrats to cNet for being concise on this one... Reminds me of the old days...

    Good keyboards? I find bang for the buck for key boards has come a *long* way. I buy $7.95 Cicero keyboards at Future Shop (argh), which have an incredibly good feel to them. They way my kids (okay, okay, and I), go through keyboards, I'm glad I have have "disposable" keyboards with a great feel. Other than that, thought it was a cool article.
  • Keyboards (Score:3, Insightful)

    by Remlik (654872) on Monday August 08, 2005 @08:43AM (#13268536) Homepage
    Keyboards have been my biggest complaint for many years. My home keyboard is one I got used off of and old Pentium 60 Zeos corp computer. Its AT, it has a full click in the keys (not quite as full as the classic IBM keyboards of old) and the larger enter key. For my needs this is the best keyboard out there. I type faster and with less mistakes.

    At work I have another AT style keyboard gotten from a garage sale for 2 bucks. It has 12 extra programable function keys, a build in calculator and of course the full click and larger enter key.

    A trip to my local Compusa shows me about 12 different keyboards and all of them suck with one exception. The exception is a keyboard with removed sidebar number pad in a metalic base (heavy, nice) and it is basically a notebook keyboard. Flat keys with a short throw click..it sells for $250 !!! One day it will be mine.
  • Good Wired Keyboards (Score:3, Interesting)

    by adamjone (412980) on Monday August 08, 2005 @09:40AM (#13268845) Homepage
    I've experienced numbers 7 and 8 directly within the last couple of months. After switching jobs, my new cube was outfitted with a truly horrible Belkin 104 key model. The keys felt like someone had spilled orange juice all over it, sticking in position up or down. What I really wanted was an ergonomic wired keyboard. Good luck finding one. I tried Best Buy, Target, Fry's, and Wal-Mart without success. All had wireless ergonomic models, but nothing wired. So I caved and got the Microsoft Wireless Desktop Comfort Edition. It was a wireless mouse / keyboard combo, and the keyboard had a nice ergonomic curve to it. Big mistake. Nearly everyone in the office has a wireless device, so there is a ton of interference. Add to that the fact that the keyboard consistently misses keystrokes, or sticks the control or shift key down. This is murder when using Vi for editing.

    Where can I find a good, wired, ergonomically shaped keyboard?

Premature optimization is the root of all evil. -- D.E. Knuth

Working...