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Mozilla The Internet

SeaMonkey 1.0 Released 229

Posted by Zonk
from the enjoy-your-aquatic-simians dept.
johkir writes "SeaMonkey has been released. Mozilla.org's open source internet suite features a state-of-the-art web browser and powerful email client, as well as a WYSIWYG web page composer and a feature-rich IRC chat client. For web developers, mozilla.org's DOM inspector and JavaScript debugger tools are included as well. It also has a few nifty features, of particular interest: drag&drop reordering of tabs, support for a common inbox for multiple email accounts, SVG, , and phishing detection."
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SeaMonkey 1.0 Released

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  • by dghcasp (459766) on Tuesday January 31, 2006 @02:41PM (#14609664)
    What exactly is SeaMonkey? Based on this summary of features, it sounds exactly like Mozilla.
    • SeaMonkey is the old Mozilla Suite... Mozilla foundation decided to stick with stand-alone products, but some people missed the old suite and a few of the features and stuff, so the decided to carry it on as this community driven project ;)
      • So, is it Firefox and Thunderbird thrown together in one executable? Or is it something more or less. I guess what I want to know is:

        1) Compatability with Thunder/Fire themes and extensions.
        2) Does it share the same security holes, or will it have its own ;)
        3) Will it be udated as often as Thunder/Fire?
        • by Anonymous Coward
          It's the old Mozilla suite. It shares code with Firefox/Thunderbird but it isn't just them combined.

          1) Any plugins that worked with the old Mozilla suite should work (many plugins worked with both Monolithic Mozilla and Firefox). I doubt Thunderbird ones would, but I haven't tried.
          2) It will share Gecko security holes, but not Firefox-UI based ones.
          3) Update speed all depends on the developers and their quality standards.
        • by savala (874118) on Tuesday January 31, 2006 @03:26PM (#14610195)
          So, is it Firefox and Thunderbird thrown together in one executable? Or is it something more or less.

          It's both more and less. It has a different approach to what such a program should be. Firefox and Thunderbird operate on the principle that it needs to be usable by the proverbial grandmother, and make a lot of sacrifices to get there. Features that are considered "bloat" or confusing are cut rigorously, the user interface gets lots of polishing, and everything that isn't considered essential for basic operation is delegated to the status of extension (which leads to a number of problems [dbaron.org]). Because of this, Firefox and Thunderbird are supremely usable products, which I'll heartily recommend to any computer novice.

          SeaMonkey on the other hand continues the tradition of the Mozilla Suite, which cared less about appearing clunky and confusing, and is far more customizable and ultimately usable for power users, web developers and other geeks. The SeaMonkey people understand that people can have ways to browse which aren't intuitively obvious to grandmothers, but which are ultimately more efficient, and that enabling this is a great good.

          As a result SeaMonkey has a number of features that aren't present (by default or at all) in Firefox/Thunderbird, ranging from roaming profiles, to the dom inspector and javascript debugger, to tighter integration between the email program and the browser to far more preferences exposed and easily editable. On the other hand, Firefox has more money behind it, and so has been developing rapidly in some areas, resulting in a large gap in SeaMonkey in an area such as extension management (of course, extensions aren't as necessary for effectively using SeaMonkey, but it's still a big gap).

          So, to answer your three questions:

          Compatability with Thunder/Fire themes and extensions.

          Partly, depending on the specifics of the extension, and the effort its developer went to. I answered this question more fully here [slashdot.org].

          Does it share the same security holes, or will it have its own ;)

          It will mostly have the same (as most security problems are in the backend), but a few less in the frontend, as SeaMonkey has tighter review requirements than Firefox does. (I can think of one big security problem in the last year that was related to extension management which was only present in Firefox, not in Mozilla/SeaMonkey.)

          Will it be udated as often as Thunder/Fire?

          Yes, that is the goal, give or take a few weeks and some point releases. A SeaMonkey 1.1 release should come around the time of Firefox 2.0, and a SeaMonkey 1.5 for whenever Firefox 3.0 happens. (They'll be matches fairly closely in time, as both depend on the same branches and heavily tested stable code.)

      • No. I realize it's three whole paragraphs down, but:

        "The SeaMonkey project is a community-based project hosted at mozilla.org that emerged around Mozilla's suite codebase when the Mozilla Foundation announced it would discontinue further development of its suite product.

    • by digitaldc (879047) * on Tuesday January 31, 2006 @02:44PM (#14609709)
      It's a cheap packet of cryptobiotic shrimp you can order off the back of any comic book. By the way, they never look as friendly or as big as the pictures. :(
    • Originally it was the codename for the Mozilla suite. Gecko was the codename for the browser component itself. Now that Mozilla is mostly focusing on Firefox, the Mozilla browser (which itself took on Netscape's codename) has been forked to make SeaMonkey.

      Are you thoroughly confused yet? Good, that's the idea.

      Me? I'm waiting for a release of Chocolate Sex. (Bonus points to those who understand that reference.)

      P.S. Don't forget about Chimera!
    • by Anonymous Coward
      The Mozilla foundation stopped developing the Suite after the 1.8 beta 1 release and switched to Firefox and Thunderbird. A group of developers didn't want to abandon the Suite and improved it independently. In order to make clear that the result is not an official Mozilla.org product (and because Mozilla.org owns the Mozilla trademark), it was renamed to SeaMonkey, which formerly was the internal code name for the Suite. So yes, SeaMonkey is "Mozilla", but with different logos, a different name and a diffe
    • What exactly is SeaMonkey?

      Is it chicken or is it monkey?
    • If you don't already know what SeaMonkey is then it's probably of little interest to you. It's the original Mozilla codebase that has since been replaced by Firefox, Thunderbird, and Nvu.

      Its user interface design is largely based off of Netscape Communicator 4 and is only meant for those who are nostalgic for the days of yore.

      • Sorry to troll, but shit, someone had to....

        If you don't already know what SeaMonkey is then it's probably of little interest to you


        Dang, that sounds elitist. Where is the fun in only learning what we already know and using what we already use???

        • I wasn't trying to sound elitist. What I meant is that SeaMonkey codebase is in fact old and announcing it as a new 1.0 product is a little disingenuous.

          You may recall that the fruits of Mozilla.org's efforts did not gain any traction with the general browsing public until the Firefox interface came along, at which point the old SeaMonkey interface was rightfully dropped. An independent group of developers has since formed to continue development, essentailly moving new Firefox and Thunderbird features b
          • You may recall that the fruits of Mozilla.org's efforts did not gain any traction with the general browsing public until the Firefox interface came along,..

            What I 'recall' is that I used the Mozilla suite for a long, long time and was quite happy with it. Then a bunch of people started hollering about 'Firefox' so I thought I would give it a try. I installed it, and found it missing all kinds of features and menu items I made use of with the suite. It basically gave me the impression of being the 'Window
      • by oojah (113006) on Tuesday January 31, 2006 @06:40PM (#14611977) Homepage
        > Its user interface design is largely based off of Netscape Communicator 4 and is only meant
        > for those who are nostalgic for the days of yore.

        Or else for those who think that Firefox is just a dumbed down version.

        imho.

        Roger
  • by fanblade (863089) on Tuesday January 31, 2006 @02:41PM (#14609669) Journal
    SeaMonkey? I bet this thing dies in a matter of days.
  • WYSIWYG (Score:5, Interesting)

    by ZephyrXero (750822) <zephyrxero@nOsPam.yahoo.com> on Tuesday January 31, 2006 @02:42PM (#14609681) Homepage Journal
    So how does the Sea Monkey web editor compare to Nvu [nvu.com]? If it's better, that'll really suck having to download a whole suite just for that one component. Why Mozilla Corp/Foundation hasn't released it's own editor still is beyond me...
    • Re:WYSIWYG (Score:5, Informative)

      by savala (874118) on Tuesday January 31, 2006 @02:50PM (#14609790)
      So how does the Sea Monkey web editor compare to Nvu? If it's better, that'll really suck having to download a whole suite just for that one component.
      It isn't better, as it's the basis on which NVu has been built (missing lots of features, but with the same basics). NVu's main developer has committed to donating back [glazman.org] all the new code to the main Mozilla tree before releasing another version of NVu, and as far as I know, that's currently in the process of happening (although slowly, as it's a lot of code to be reviewed, and not many people capable of doing so).
      SeaMonkey 1.5 should contain the results of this work, so basically a WYSIWYG editor nearly identical to current NVu.
    • Re:WYSIWYG (Score:5, Informative)

      by CTho9305 (264265) on Tuesday January 31, 2006 @02:53PM (#14609829) Homepage
      You don't have to download the whole suite - grab the stub installer (a bit over 200KB), and just the parts you want.
    • Re:WYSIWYG (Score:4, Informative)

      by Otter (3800) on Tuesday January 31, 2006 @02:57PM (#14609890) Journal
      Nvu comes from the Mozilla editor codebase, although I don't know if the two have forked or if they're kept in sync at all. Comparing Nvu with the current Mozilla editor -- Nvu has many more features, some of which (site control, CSS editing) are great, some of which (the different link attributes like "date" and "crush") are stupid and some of which (the "New" command, for heaven's sake) don't work. I still prefer Mozilla for light editing, but Nvu would be better (although probably inadequate) for heavier use.

      Anyway, "suite" here is only 12-13 megs -- it's not like installing Office or Open Office.

    • I maintain my site using VIM, but a WYSIWYG html editor with syntax highlighting of PHP for my initial development efforts would be kind of handy for working on my local machine. Do either of these editors happen to include that feature?
  • IE? (Score:3, Interesting)

    by ZachPruckowski (918562) <zachary.pruckowski@gmail.com> on Tuesday January 31, 2006 @02:42PM (#14609687)
    Well, IE officially fell behind again. I mean, it sounded like that new beta was competition for Seamonkey/Firefox, but ten minutes after that's out, Mozilla obsoletes it. Was this scheduled?
    • In just about every industry, commodity products (open source software in this case) will eventually over power proprietary ones ;)
  • What's new: (Score:2, Funny)

    by karmaflux (148909)
    Autoscroll! HOORAY!

    canvas tags! Boooo!

    Drag and drop tabs! Eh.

    Also, "Attempting to compose, forward, or reply to a message may result in a non-functional compose window." Sounds handy.

    Really, I've just been waiting for autoscroll.

    More at http://www.mozilla.org/projects/seamonkey/releases /seamonkey1.0/README.html [mozilla.org]
    • Autoscroll! HOORAY!

      Autoscroll? How does it know when you reach the bottom of the page?

      canvas tags! Boooo!

      wtf are they?

      Drag and drop tabs! Eh.

      Wake me up when you can attach and detach tabs at will.
      • Re:What's new: (Score:3, Informative)

        by Anonymous Coward
        Canvas is a WHATWG (Web Hypertext Application Technology Working Group) recommendation for a "resolution-dependent bitmap canvas, which can be used for rendering graphs, game graphics, or other visual images on the fly". In other words, it's some of that web 2.0 stuff. More info here. [whatwg.org]
    • Re:What's new: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by AeroIllini (726211)
      canvas tags! Boooo!

      What's wrong with <canvas> tags? I think they are a revolutionary idea.

      Once they become part of the HTML5 spec (and WHATWG is working on it now), then suddenly web developers will have a way to show those corny Flash movies without needing a plugin. The browser will support dynamic bitmap refresh natively. Eventually, it will support 3D rendering natively too, probably through OpenGL. Imagine playing Doom in a web browser, with no plugins. Or a contractor showing clients around a vi
  • by solaufein (576986) on Tuesday January 31, 2006 @02:44PM (#14609712)
    Link to download Seamonkey 1.0 for win32 leads to a 404.
    Link for full download is: ftp://ftp.mozilla.org/pub/mozilla.org/seamonkey/re leases/1.0/seamonkey-1.0.en-US.win32.installer.exe [mozilla.org]
    Link for ftp of releases: ftp://ftp.mozilla.org/pub/mozilla.org/seamonkey/re leases/1.0/ [mozilla.org]
  • I haven't been paying close attention to developments in the Mozilla world outside Firefox, Thunderbird and the Calendaring application.

    Is the "Mozilla Suite" project dead? Is Seamonkey the replacement for the old Mozilla Suite? Will the next version of Netscape be based on Seamonkey 1.0?

    For whatever reason, many people in the business world don't know what "Mozilla" means, and may take them a while to recognize the name of "Seamonkey". However, they still recognize the name "Netscape".

    I'm shocked to find o
    • by CTho9305 (264265) on Tuesday January 31, 2006 @03:01PM (#14609920) Homepage
      Is the "Mozilla Suite" project dead? Is Seamonkey the replacement for the old Mozilla Suite? Will the next version of Netscape be based on Seamonkey 1.0?

      "Mozilla Suite" will only get security updates. No more new development. SeaMonkey is a good replacement for the old suite - it's effectively Mozilla 1.8 (SeaMonkey 1.0 alpha was what would have been Mozilla 1.8 beta 5). If Netscape decides to ship annother "Communicator" (rather than just a browser), they would be wise to use SeaMonkey as a base for it.
  • by revery (456516) <charles@NosPam.cac2.net> on Tuesday January 31, 2006 @02:48PM (#14609766) Homepage
    I have been a bit leery of anything called "Seamonkeys" ever since I ordered a kit off of the back of my Amazing Spider-Man comic book many years ago. I was quite disappointed when it arrived and the creatures that hatched in my goldfish bowl were not the family of happy trident-bearing mer-creatures pictured in the ad, but a bunch of freaking shrimp.
    So go ahead Mozilla, and sell the world on your little state-of-the-art web browser and powerful email client, as well as a WYSIWYG web page composer and a feature-rich IRC chat client. I'm not gonna be sucked in to your little scheme. In the words of our great President Bush, "Fool me once, shame on... you.... The Fooled man can't be fooled again"

    • by Anonymous Coward
      "There's an old saying in Tennessee -- I know it's in Texas, probably in Tennessee -- that says, fool me once, shame on -- shame on... shame on you. Fool me -- you can't get fooled again."

      Sheesh... I mean if even the president can get it right you should at least put some effort into quoting him correctly.
    • If you haven't seen Bush's malapropism, you ought to check it out: I love the internet [youtube.com]. And the Daily Show.
  • Yay! I like my browser, email client and irc app integrted out of the box. I'm happy this is still around.

    Now, if people would start making themes for mozilla again. The default and the ones I have found are butt ugly.

    Maybe I will learn to make some myself. I wouldn't mind a firefox themse for mozilla or a kde theme ( for current releases ).
    • by Malc (1751)
      Sigh! The monolithic app where everything runs in the same process is so braindead. Apps don't have to run in the same process space to be tightly integrated. My memories of the Mozilla Suite were a crash in the browser caused me to lose the last half-hour's edits of an email - such a bad architecture.
      • Yeah, it's kind of funny that they went with such an architecture to begin with, it's so un-Unix like.

        Eric
        Real-life applications for PageRank [memwg.com]
        • So un-Unix like, in fact, that it's positively Emacs-like!

          Actually, my favorite description of the difference between Windows and Unix philosophies goes like this:

          In Windows, whenever the OS succeeds in doing something, you expect to see a friendly message box pop up.

          In Unix, you typically only see a message when a command fails.

          But in both systems, it is the rarer case that gets reported.

      • by pe1chl (90186)
        It doesn't crash so often anymore. I have it running for weeks on end.

        I think it is not good to have multiple html rendering engines running in different processes either... in theory they could be shared, but un Firefox/Thunderbird practice this does not seem to happen.
    • Now, if people would start making themes for mozilla again. The default and the ones I have found are butt ugly.

      There are a bunch here:

      https://addons.mozilla.org/themes/?application=moz illa [mozilla.org]
  • by fanblade (863089) on Tuesday January 31, 2006 @03:03PM (#14609948) Journal
    Here is the exciting new logo [mozilla.org] for this suite. Oddly, it looks nothing like a real [coqui.net] sea [douglaslain.com] monkey. [zaldiva.com]

    Personally, I think it's a cross between a blue bird [altech.ab.ca] and a scorpion stinger [asu.edu].
  • Continuing the old Mozilla suite is fine, but one thing I am missing is a way to integrate my email and calendar. Mozilla "Lightning" was supposed to do this but the page hasn't been updated since January of 2005. Anyone have any clue if this is still on the Mozilla radar?

  • In case you missed it, let me clue you in. Suites are dead. People want lean applications with user-selected add-ons. Funky cutesy names are out...they lingered on a bit after the dot com bust (along with e- and i- names) but descriptive branding is the order of the day. "Microsoft Office" "Mozilla Internet Suite" "Apple Music Player". Oops...Jobs is going to kill me for leaking the last one...
  • How many times are people going ask what is SeaMonkey or is it the same as FireFox? If you don't know then go google it for god's sake! The other half of this question is why do people keep answering? If someone is not intelligent enough to read the previous 50 posts that answer this question they shouldn't be on /. Now back to the topic, please excuse my rant. I love that this going to continue being worked on. I like it more than firefox especially the debugging tools. If you are a developr this is
  • by HeliumHigh (773838) <heliumhigh AT gmail DOT com> on Tuesday January 31, 2006 @03:53PM (#14610438) Journal
    Right as I clicked on the link, Windows BSOD'ed on me. Hehehe... it must really be good!
  • I think its awesome.

    A browser that was dumped in favour of something newer and shiner was picked up by a community willing to put work into it. This is a perfect example of what Open Source is all about. Compare that to software like OS/2 or BeOS, both of which have a following and a community which is willing to back them. Instead they are gathering dust in some proprietary repository.
  • I like the Seamonkey suite, in part because it discreetly bundles the ChatZilla IRC client with a Gecko-based web browser. On my Windows box at work, Seamonkey seems to render web pages faster than Firefox.

    However, I am disappointed that there seems to still be no support for "live bookmarks" (RSS feeds in bookmark form). That is the killer feature that made me switch from the Mozilla suite to Firefox. Are there any plans to implement this handy functionality in Seamonkey? If so, when?
    • However, I am disappointed that there seems to still be no support for "live bookmarks" (RSS feeds in bookmark form). That is the killer feature that made me switch from the Mozilla suite to Firefox. Are there any plans to implement this handy functionality in Seamonkey?

      The bug for this is bug 240393 [mozilla.org] (copy paste link, as /. referers are blocked) and doesn't have any activity. If a developer who cares about this steps up to the plate, it could be in soon, but otherwise I wouldn't expect it for a while.

      Ho

  • I keep running into a chatzilla bug where it uses up 100% CPU until you quit the chat portion of the browser, and it gets you disconnected due to "Excess Flood" from servers, even if you dont type anything in. It got me banned from an IRC server a couple days ago... but I was running 1.0B, any word as to if that is fixed?
  • ... have my money.

    Yes, I'm a natural blue.

  • by pe1chl (90186) on Tuesday January 31, 2006 @05:23PM (#14611255)
    Is there still an i18n project? I see two local builds, but not the long list of language packs.
    Are the current i18n groups willing to translate Seamonkey or will this have to be setup completely from scratch?
    Presumably a Mozilla 1.7 translation can be used as a basis...

    I would like to install a Dutch version at work, but I see no mention at all of Seamonkey on the Mozilla-NL site. It is centered around Firefox and Thunderbird these days, but still had a Mozilla 1.8a translation last year.
  • ...and a feature-rich IRC chat client.

    You have no idea how much time I've wasted with the Internet Relay Chat chat. If I only had a nickel from the Automated Teller Machine machine for every day I've wasted...
    • If you hadn't have forgotten you Personal ID Number number you might not have lost so much time at the automated teller machine machine. I just sold a car and had to go out and find the vehicle identification number number. It was cold out so I warmed my hands up by using host water from the hot water heater.

      G
  • by lamp540 (644770)
    first they called it netscape(which was mosaic), then they change it's name to mozilla, then firefox, and now it's called sea monkey? and it's always the same, just a web browser...nothing amazing.
  • Although I primary use and love Konqueror [konqueror.org], I wish to congratulate the SeaMonkey developers for continuing the suite project. I actually hate Firefox, although I have it installed (together with Epiphany, Mozilla, Opera and other browsers).

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