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Windows Operating Systems Software

Vista an Uneasy Sleeper 395

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the just-like-most-3-year-olds dept.
Emmy King writes "
One thing we just can't wrap our mind about is the terrible, broken, and completely pitiful support for waking Vista up from a Deep Sleep or hibernation.
Anytime you attempt to wake Vista up from Hibernation or "Deep Sleep" (S3-induced sleep mode), it dies. It's either a BSOD, or a driver error, or a broken network, no DWM, lack of sound... the list goes on, and on. So much for an operating system to "power" the future! (No pun intended!) That's with properly-signed drivers and no buggy software on multiple PCs..."
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Vista an Uneasy Sleeper

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  • Linux (Score:3, Funny)

    by Anonymous Coward on Sunday December 10, 2006 @09:19AM (#17183912)
    Linux: Ritalin for your new vista box
    • Re:Linux (Score:4, Funny)

      by WilliamSChips (793741) <full@infinity.gmail@com> on Sunday December 10, 2006 @09:20AM (#17183916) Journal
      Linux: It doesn't suck.
  • So which of those 9 shut-down options can we eliminate now? Probably all but the one that goes "shut the hell off"?
    • by Frumious Wombat (845680) on Sunday December 10, 2006 @10:08AM (#17184298)
      They have to keep it, as it's an important usability option. Now your computer can act like you first thing in the morning. HAL, here we come!
    • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

      by Anonymous Coward
      Nine options?? Damn!!
      What options must I think of???

      Option 1. Shutdown Vista.
      Option 2. Hybernate mode.
      Option 3. Restart.
      Option 4. Force Shutdown.
      Option 5. Shutdown all Users in Usergroup.
      Option 6. Shutdown all Users in Network
      Option 7. Restart in Safemode.
      Option 8. Restart in Safemode (network conn).

      and finaly last one!

      Option 9. Shutdown every Vista User PC located in the world!!!

      whahahaha!

      Le Marquis
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      Eliminate all except for the one that says, "Uninstall Vista and revert to previous version of Windows."
  • by Junta (36770) on Sunday December 10, 2006 @09:25AM (#17183952)
    S3 is plain old suspend/sleep. hibernate/deep sleep implies suspend to disk and total power down, and is S4. And the word S3-induced makes no sense, S3 is a state entered into, not an active thing.
    • by agent dero (680753) on Sunday December 10, 2006 @09:42AM (#17184058) Homepage
      You're absolutely right, they should put those in the shutdown menu as well.

      Seriously, KDE can get it right, Mac OS X can get it right. What's so wrong with: Sleep, Restart, Shutdown (, Logout)
      • by v1 (525388) on Sunday December 10, 2006 @10:32AM (#17184476) Homepage Journal
        I was thinking about that, and it's actually pretty surprising how well some systems sleep. Mac OS X can sleep through anything short of a disk burn. I have seen very rare cases where vendor specific hardware didn't wake up properly, but that's probably a vendor driver issue. The OS seems to have its act together.

        The new intel mac laptops now support hibernate instead of sleep. There is no longer a backup battery in the mac laptops. When you sleep them, they appear to go to sleep instantly, but they are not asleep yet. Display is off, sleep light is on (solid), but it is now paging memory off to disk, and will take my 2gb mbp about 25 seconds to do it. Then you hear the HD park and the sleep light begins pulsing. I try not to stuff it in the bag or jolt it around until it actually parks the HD.

        This means you can pull the battery even, and power it back up later and instead of the usual 4 second wakeup time, you get about 20 seconds of watching a washed out image of the last screen, with a dotted progress bar. (looks a bit like a firmware update in progress) When the dots get to the right it's awake again. It has done this from a complete power-down and memory clear. Impressive. I have not noticed anything that fails to wake up properly even from this mode.

        Another nice perk is that if you sleep it, and it loses power, (battery is removed by accident, someone kicks out the power cord etc) it simply appears to have shut off. (no sleep light) Then when you try to turn it back on, it just wakes from hibernation with the usual washed out screen and 20 second progresssbar instead of the quick wakeup.

        I don't think the mac pro (the desktop) supports hibernate though, but it couldn't be that hard for them to add support for?
        • by ribond (149811) on Sunday December 10, 2006 @11:17AM (#17184832) Journal
          The difference in the apple product model shows through here. Power management problems like those described by the story submitter (love that random complaints can be slashdot front page material) are related to bios in use, drivers in use... apple folk obviously deliver an OS to a limited set of hardware, drivers, bioses (did I pluralize that properly?). Windows tries to be all things to all people. breadth vs. depth, etc...

          When XP came out many (many many many) systems could not boot in ACPI mode. Many systems had a bios that would report as supporting ACPI and then fall over in an unexpected way... what resolved this was.... time in market. Once it became important to boot XP it became important to pay attention to the ACPI spec. The XP installer actually has a backdoor built in for those dark days of 2001... you can bang on "f7" when you boot into textmode setup (the media-boot phase) and setup will ignore ACPI support.

          Vista no longer supports non-acpi machines. Vista also tries to do more with power management and if you have current-ish system from a major OEM (dell, gateway, sony, toshiba, hp, etc) they've already posted BIOS updates to make things go in the brave new world. Partnering with the big guys is where MS can recover some depth in the hardware space.

          Vista now provides a new hybrid sleep mode, combining standby with hibernation. The sleep option will write out a hibernate file so that if the machine takes a nap & runs out of juice (laptop scenario here) you can plug the box in and resume without losing your context. I'm typing on a Dell xps m170 right now -- it works well.

        • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

          by OriginalArlen (726444)
          Both suspend and hibernate work fine on this Thinkpad under GNU/Linux... & have done since I got it, almost 2 years ago.
        • by ceoyoyo (59147) on Sunday December 10, 2006 @12:22PM (#17185340)
          You can tell it to do something I like even better. It writes everything to disk as you described, but sits in suspended mode instead of hibernate. If your battery goes dead or you yank the battery it will resume from the disk copy, otherwise it pops up instantly just like the Powerbooks. Best of both worlds.
    • by hey! (33014)
      According to TFA, the problem occurs under suspend (S3) or hibernate (S4).

      IIRC "Deep Sleep" is not the official name of any ACPI state, although some refer to S3 that was ("deep" relative to S1).
  • bummer (Score:5, Insightful)

    by yagu (721525) * <yayagu@@@gmail...com> on Sunday December 10, 2006 @09:26AM (#17183958) Journal

    Each new release, each patch, each service pack I keep waiting for the perfect, all-right-I'll-settle-for-well-behaved advanced power control. I find this unsettling Vista may not deliver. One "feature" I always treasure in Windows systems is its "better" support for power control.

    At least Windows with its more cozy relationship with chip and BIOS industry supposedly offers ACPI for fast "sleep" and "rewake" functionality. In fact that was my trick way to get ACPI for linux when it was really important by running a vmware install of linux within a well behaved windows (not always as well behaved as I'd have wished, but better than the problematic ACPI linux support).

    And now, out of the gates (sic) Vista may not deliver? That's going to leave a mark. I'd considered getting a machine for educational purposes (since I do support for everyone I know), but I'd considered waiting for some of the initial bugs to get ironed out. I just didn't expect this big of an initial speedbump. Guess there's not much to do but wait for Microsoft to get it right, or close to right.

    Also, I thought I'd read they were offering super-sized power control a la scheduled up and down times, etc. More vaporware?

    I'm still amazed they get to skate on this kind of stuff.

    • Re:bummer (Score:4, Interesting)

      by timeOday (582209) on Sunday December 10, 2006 @10:47AM (#17184606)
      Does power management work properly on Apple computers? If so, they're the only ones to get it working right. On Linux you normally can get it working, but it's the kind of job that is likely to take several days with no guaranteed outcome. And 90% of the time you think it's working, you'll still find glitches over time - no sound after resume, won't suspend if USB devices are plugged in, won't suspend if 3d acceleration is enabled, crashes every 10th suspend or so, appears to suspend to RAM just fine but battery drain is far more than it should be... I've concluded that power management is just insanely tricky. APM/ACPI must be inconsistently implemented on every device, otherwise it could never work as poorly as it does.

      I should never have to reboot my laptop. I should be able to pop it into my docking station, resume from hibernation, and have it come up working properly including my desktop monitor and all the other peripherals hooked to the docking station. And the reverse should be true when I leave at night. I've never seen it happen.

      • On Linux you normally can get it working, but it's the kind of job that is likely to take several days with no guaranteed outcome. And 90% of the time you think it's working, you'll still find glitches over time - no sound after resume, won't suspend if USB devices are plugged in, won't suspend if 3d acceleration is enabled, crashes every 10th suspend or so, appears to suspend to RAM just fine but battery drain is far more than it should be... I've concluded that power management is just insanely tricky. A

      • ACPI Sucks. (Score:2, Interesting)

        by twitter (104583)

        I've concluded that power management is just insanely tricky. APM/ACPI must be inconsistently implemented on every device, otherwise it could never work as poorly as it does.

        ACPI [wikipedia.org] does suck. It's a typical M$, "extensible," "do it in software" nightmare described in 500 pages of spec. It reminds me of nothing more than a winmodem. It will be hard even for careful hardware makers to follow and that's what M$ likes.

        APM, on the other hand, worked well for laptops and still does if supported. I close t

      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        Does power management work properly on Apple computers? If so, they're the only ones to get it working right.

        here's something you may not have known: Sun boxen (some workstations) can actually suspend to disk (and power down) and when you resume (such as the next day when you power up the workstation) the unix o/s resumes gracefully and FULLY architected (not a hack but proper part of solaris).

        it surprised me since you don't think of Sun as an 'APM' implementation company, but it is true for at least some S

    • Each new release, each patch, each service pack I keep waiting for the perfect, all-right-I'll-settle-for-well-behaved advanced power control.

      If you want that, get a Mac. My iBook has been waking from sleep reliably (and almost instantaneously!) since 2003, and the new Intel Macs can hibernate, too.

  • Screw Ups (Score:4, Informative)

    by Anonymous Coward on Sunday December 10, 2006 @09:27AM (#17183966)
    So someone fucks it up and it's irrevocably broken? I've used both sleep and hibernate functions on my laptop since Vista was beta 1 and both have worked beautifully. Both features require decent support from the hardware, not just "signed drivers."
    • Re:Screw Ups (Score:5, Interesting)

      by doctormetal (62102) on Sunday December 10, 2006 @09:44AM (#17184086)
      Same here. Both my notebook and desktop work without any problems with sleep and hibernation under vista.
      Sleep did not work on either of them under winxp.
      This sound like unfounded ms bashing by someone who got frustated.
      • by Rycross (836649)
        Same, have always had problems with sleep and hibernate, move to Vista, everything works perfectly.
    • by GIL_Dude (850471)
      It's worked pretty well for me through the betas and into RTM. The drivers are key; they can be signed but still "not so good". For the Lenovo T60p I am using, Beta 2 worked great with sleep. Then RC1 would sleep OK, but no network when you would come out of sleep. With RC2, the wired network would work, but the wireless was toast after sleep. With RTM, the wired works after sleep, the wireless only works for networks that broadcast their SSID. For ones that don't (like the one we have at work), the wireles
    • Only in the *final* (Score:2, Informative)

      by kripkenstein (913150)
      You say you've been using Vista "since beta 1". But which are you using now, still one of the beta versions, or the final (which isn't available to run-of-the-mill consumers yet)? TFA says:

      Throughout the beta, Deep Sleep in Windows Vista went great. [...] But in the final version of Windows Vista, something is very, very majorly wrong.

      The problem is in the final version only, not a beta. This wasn't mentioned in the Slashdot summary, though, which could have saved confusion for those that don't RTFA.
  • by 3seas (184403) on Sunday December 10, 2006 @09:28AM (#17183980) Journal
    ...I didn't know Vista was out yet. Thought it was still in the debuggng stage...

    Or maybe I'm still sleeping and this is a dream. Vista released with major operational flaws. Now that's a Linux promotion!
    • by Jugalator (259273)
      It's out for business customers, but in unreleased according to many driver developers. ;-) (these consider January 2007 to be the official launch) So then you get these sort of problems I guess. This article is jumping way too quick to conclusions. Heck, this feature even works just fine here, so Vista is not at fault anyway, but it has to be some external source.
    • Yeah, it's a real nice beta they released a few weeks ago. I can't wait to see the final release next year!
    • by Rycross (836649)
      Its out if you have a MSDN subscription. I have one through work and have been using Vista for about a month.
  • by woodhouse (625329) on Sunday December 10, 2006 @09:29AM (#17183982) Homepage
    I'd like to know where this completely bug free software comes from. The last completely bug-free software I saw was Hello World.
    • The last completely bug-free software I saw was Hello World.

      Really? The last time I ran "Hello World" a virus did a low level format of my hard disk...or was that "ILOVEU"???
    • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

      by WheresMyDingo (659258)
      The last completely bug-free software I saw was Hello World.

      Nope, has an output format bug. It should end with an exclamation point, as in: "Hello World!"

    • Yeah, right -- I bet it had a buffer overflow in printf or something!

  • Once I went laptop-only, hibernating became the truth, the light and the way. Before that I never hibernated because I never shut the desktop off.

    Interesting that TFA says Vista hibernated fine in beta but not in the release version. Oddly, Xp hibernated flawlessly on my laptop but openSuSE 10.1 hangs every time. No Linux distro hibernates this particular laptop (toshiba). We'll see if 10.2 will as soon as ATI gets done developing Vista drivers and gives us a driver for Xorg 7.2
    • Once I went laptop-only, hibernating became the truth, the light and the way.

      Do you mean suspend? Hibernate is only very slightly better than shutting down and restarting again. Suspend on the other hand, is overwhelmingly fantastic.

  • by oKtosiTe (793555) on Sunday December 10, 2006 @09:33AM (#17184002)
    It doesn't look to me like there was no pun intended...
  • by Anonymous Coward on Sunday December 10, 2006 @09:44AM (#17184088)
    I'm vociferously anti-MS; but in this case, I believe they deserve a small pardon. Go read the ACPI specifications [acpi.info] sometime. You will cry and beg for mercy. ACPI is horrible. Considering the small number of requirements the real world has for such an interface, the specification is vast beyond imagining. Linux has also had long standing problems producing a proper ACPI layer, for this very reason: ACPI is a pig.

    Now it is worth noting that MS themselves contributed to the development of this specification. The cynical side of me believes that confounding the competition by way of impenetrable specifications is simply Microsoft's modis operandi. Look at Microsoft's OpenXML specification for example: while in theory it meets the European requirement for documenting file formats and protocols, in practice it's ~6,000 pages will certainly confound all but the most determined attempts at interoperability. But here's the rub: Microsoft has to eat their own dog food, and they are suffering the consequences. Microsoft's operating system and applications are becoming so piggish that even Microsoft can't manage them.
  • by Anonymous Coward
    Huh. I've got two systems here with Vista running on them, a Dell e1505 notebook and a not-as-new homebuilt Athlon X2 system, and on both of them both hibernate and sleep "Just Work." In fact, Vista's been less problematic in all areas than XP could ever dream of being.

    They don't quite Bill's 6 second boot time either - but both systems clock in right around 10 seconds, and that's pretty hard to complain about.
    • I also have an Dell, though it's a e1405/640m. Hibernation and sleep mode work perfectly under vista. It worked perfectly under XP MCE also as far as I could tell.
  • fud ahead (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Silicon Avatar (30968) on Sunday December 10, 2006 @09:51AM (#17184144) Homepage
    I've had fewer problems with my laptop since installing vista than I ever had with linux.

    Pretty much everything worked 'out-the-box' -- including video (although I ultimately had to go download the vista drivers from ATI to get any kind of acceleration), sound, even suspend/sleep (although, microsoft renaming hibernate to sleep confused me at first).

    There are plenty of places where microsoft seems to suck across the board .. but vista sleeping and waking up works just fine.

    BTW - this sleeping is a feature that I never did get 100% working properly in linux -- and what I WAS able to get working right required I bounce around a few websites ultimatly doing my own research ... whereas it seems to work now in vista just fine?
  • Huh? (Score:4, Insightful)

    by Jugalator (259273) on Sunday December 10, 2006 @09:52AM (#17184154) Journal
    This feature works just great here, making it quite impossible it's due to Vista (unless my Vista is magic), but rather due to hardware drivers after all.
    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by Jugalator (259273)
      Oh, and also note that many vendors consider January to be the launch date of Vista, such as Creative Labs and NVIDIA, and aren't focusing much on high performance and stable drivers for the RTM yet. With hibernation, at least three factors are essential: motherboard/BIOS support, correct BIOS settings, proper drivers. Many systems are lacking at least one of those, breaking the whole thing, causing e.g auto-reboots instead of power downs, etc. One could argue if MS shouldn't have used this feature so exten
  • by hey! (33014) on Sunday December 10, 2006 @09:54AM (#17184168) Homepage Journal

    Canst thou, O partial sleep, give thy repose
    To the wet sea-boy in an hour so rude,
    And in the calmest and most stillest night,
    With all appliances and means to boot,
    Deny it to a king? Then happy low, lie down!
    Uneasy lies the head that wears the crown.


    -Henry IV. Part II.
  • by evilviper (135110) on Sunday December 10, 2006 @09:56AM (#17184194) Journal
    S3 (Suspend) doesn't exactly work wonderfully under other operating systems either. It's highly dependant on the motherboard chipset being used, and all attached hardware.

    I would be quicker to condem Microsoft if Linux (or FreeBSD preferably) could properly suspend and resume ANY of my systems properly. Unfortunately, that doesn't seem to be the case.

    FreeBSD-6.2 was the closest I got... If I pull out my videocard and use the onboard, it actually resumes successfully.

    Though the onboard video (Savag) really blows, and I haven't yet found any version of X.org that doesn't regularly crash when using that particular driver.

    And both the onboard nic, and my SBlive card stop working, and I have to manually reload the kernel module every time I resume...

    And with all of those addeniums, that's the closest I've ever gotten to getting Suspend to work (and being forced to use the onboard video is a complete show-stopper). In fact, the latest snapshot of 7.0 was actually a downgrade, and wouldn't resume from S3 at all.

    So the problem can't lie entirely with Microsoft (though they are partly to blame for the extremely lax and often Windows-centric ACPI practices). Hardware manufacturers bare a great deal of the responsibility for making their ACPI implimentations buggy as all hell to begin with... So much so that even Microsoft apparently can't even work-around it.
    • by fermion (181285)
      I agree with you. A big problem on Linux and MS Windows is that OEM tend to use the cheapest parts available, even on machines they charge real money for, and then MS has to deal with it. OTOH, that is MS job. It is, after all, the OS of the commodity machine, and people choose ti because it is such a good value. Also, I wonder if we have these issue on hardware that is vista certified.

      Just as a point of comparison, since you mention external devices and motherboards, I have a oldish Powerbook, say I

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by value_added (719364)
      FreeBSD-6.2 was the closest I got... If I pull out my videocard and use the onboard, it actually resumes successfully. Though the onboard video (Savag) really blows, and I haven't yet found any version of X.org that doesn't regularly crash when using that particular driver. And both the onboard nic, and my SBlive card stop working, and I have to manually reload the kernel module every time I resume... And with all of those addeniums, that's the closest I've ever gotten to getting Suspend to work (and being
  • by Marbleless (640965) on Sunday December 10, 2006 @10:00AM (#17184236)
    We currently have 4 systems running Vista RTM and a not one of them has any problem waking up from hibernate. They are a mix of P4, AMD XP, and Athlons.

    We had Vista RC1 & 2 on other systems, both desktops & laptops, and they behaved perfectly as well.

    They all respond perfectly to Wake-On-LAN too. I know this because our tape backup system sends WOL packets to the systems to do the backups.
  • by dpbsmith (263124) on Sunday December 10, 2006 @10:01AM (#17184240) Homepage
    The bugs that always amaze me are the ones that seemingly would have been caught if anyone had ever actually tried the feature even once.

    The only way I can account for something like this is that perhaps when a bug exhibits "protean symptoms" (fails in a different way every time), one could imagine in a completely bureaucratic, micromanaged corporate environment, instead of being registered as "this always fails," it could be registered as two hundred completely different bug descriptions, each specific description having been recorded only once and therefore judged by management to be unimportant.

    "Fails with blue screen of death reading 0687FF13 618AC003 ..."

    being regarded as a "different" bug from

    "Fails with blue screen of death reading 31469B21 96CB2022 ..."

    And before people start saying "blame the hardware," it's Microsoft's job to make sure that Vista does work on every PC certified for it. The days when DOS said "Toshiba DOS" or "PC-DOS" or "NEC DOS" are long gone. The name on the product is Microsoft WIndows and it's Microsoft's responsibility to see that it works.

    It's Microsoft's choice whether to do this by making their code robust, or jawboning vendors at WinHEC, or pressuring vendors.
    • by hey! (33014)
      Nah. It's the kind of bug that probably never affects some configurations of hardware and software.

      I like to test my application software on a fresh virtual machine. You'd be surprised how often having a stray dll around saves your ass while you're running, so you need to test on a fresh machine.

      ON the other hand, you can't test for every case where a stray dll will do you in. I wouldn't be surprised if a lot of the people having this problem are upgraders.
  • Perhaps it does not wake up properly because, as the website states, there is "No input file specified."
  • Well, there goes that blog entry. Entire site crashes and presents a "no input file specified" error. Nice.
  • Just wondering, I'm sure it does..someone show me...
  • I don't have any laptops with the power to actually run Vista so how it comes out of hibernation is irrelevant. I don't think that Vista is going to be a laptop friendly OS in the first place given that internal hardware upgrades are nearly impossible.
  • Pun... (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Five Bucks! (769277) on Sunday December 10, 2006 @10:08AM (#17184302)

    So much for an operating system to "power" the future! (No pun intended!)

    The pun was clearly intended, otherwise there would not have been quotation marks around 'power'.

    Why can't we all just be honest about our use of puns? Puns are not always bad. There's no need to be ashamed of them.

  • by HairyCanary (688865) on Sunday December 10, 2006 @10:09AM (#17184304)
    I just opened my laptop and turned it on, and it resumed from a hibernate just fine (running Vista Business release version). No blue screen, no network problems, it put me right back where I was before with a perfectly functional session. I hate Windows as much as every other Unix geek, but it sounds to me like this is a classic case of "not enough research" ... or if you prefer, "fud".

    • but it sounds to me like this is a classic case of "not enough research"

      A rather funny comment coming from someone who presumably tested one system and found it to work, so therefore all systems must work.

      The article mentions that the author had problems with "deep sleep" on 6 of 8 systems.

      On 6 of the 8 tested systems, recovering Windows Vista from a hibernate or Deep Sleep results in one of the following:

      So he's obviously not making the claim that hiberate/Deep Sleep is broken on ALL systems, since there w

  • For now, if you really need to keep your PC on all day and all night, stick to XP, Linux, Mac OS X, or SkyOS!

    Global Warning Denial USA Rules OK!!
  • I am always uneasy when business customers ask about sleep, heres a few of the things which bug me

    What happens with network applications (take google earth as an example - it connects and logs in at program start)?
    How about a domain?
    What happens if you go to sleep on one domain and wake up plugged into another?
    What happens when you wake up outside the login hours?
    What happens if your server slot is taken for an application (because you disconnected and someone else took it)?
    What happens if you are editing a
    • by bcmm (768152)
      Things like the network getting unplugged and plugged in again happen even without hibernation. It's handled pretty much the same. No system actually simply saves the RAM to disk and powers down; things like graphics hardware state get saved first for example. I believe that applications simply see the network get disconnected and reconnected, which they should be able to handle really.
  • by buddyglass (925859) on Sunday December 10, 2006 @10:20AM (#17184388)

    ...we wait for Vista SP1 before making the jump.

    Also, because DX10 cards (and titles) will be ubiquitous by then.

  • by overshoot (39700) on Sunday December 10, 2006 @10:21AM (#17184394)
    "No, it's not."

    Why do I have this urge to post the entire Monte Python "Dead Parrot" sketch? [mtholyoke.edu]

  • Apparently ... (Score:2, Informative)

    by eck011219 (851729)
    ... the poster's blog is hosted on a Vista box, as it seems to have fallen asleep. Or been Slashdotted.

    Anyhow, I've been running Vista RC1 since it was released (and the beta before that) and never had a problem with the sleep function. Other problems, yes, but none with sleep and none so bad I'd complain about them (mostly my preferences vs. Microsoft's, predictable stuff like that).

    In fact, I was just telling my wife the other day (she just melts when I talk sweet to her like this) that the sleep/hibernat
  • by Rycross (836649) on Sunday December 10, 2006 @11:16AM (#17184820)
    Vista is the only OS I've used that has ever been able to wake up from sleep and hibernate properly.
    The OP makes it sound like their experience applies to everyone, so I have to call FUD on this.

    At any rate, I have zero problems with these features, using Vista Home Ultimate 64 bit.

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