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Flickr To Abandon Early Adopters 254

Posted by Zonk
from the enjoy-the-side-of-the-road-suckers dept.
An anonymous reader writes "ZDNet's Steve O'Hear opens old wounds for Flickr veterans. 'An email dropped into my in-box yesterday from Yahoo. Titled "Flickr: Update for Old Skool members", the message went on to explain that Yahoo was discontinuing the old email-based Flickr sign-in system and that from March the 15th, all users will be required to have a Yahoo ID to sign-in to Flickr. It was one of those déjà vu moments when I thought, hang on a minute, haven't we been here before?. And of course we have.' Yahoo tried to pull this stunt almost two years ago, after it first acquired Flickr. So why open up old wounds? Yahoo say it is to make the service easier to manage as they add new features, such as localization. Many users are calling this BS, saying it's all about Yahoo marketing its other properties to Flickr's user-base. Much of the criticism is being lead by a prominent user named Thomas Hawk who also happens to be CEO of Zooomr, a direct competitor to Flickr."
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Flickr To Abandon Early Adopters

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  • So? (Score:5, Insightful)

    by DogDude (805747) on Thursday February 01, 2007 @03:22PM (#17848136) Homepage
    I wouldn't call this "abandoning" anybody. They're asking users to use a (free) Yahoo login. It's not what I'd call a big deal. Yahoo did this when they acquired Launch (launch.com). Why would this bother anybody other than the tinfoil-hat types? What am I missing?
    • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

      by Sloppy (14984)

      What am I missing?
      The fact that the old Fickr knew how to spell "school" and Yahoo does not.
    • Re:So? (Score:5, Insightful)

      by NewWorldDan (899800) <dan@gen-tracker.com> on Thursday February 01, 2007 @03:36PM (#17848434) Homepage Journal
      Seems pretty obvious to me. Yahoo has a standard way of doing things. Maintaining an old non-standard alternate way of doing things is a bitch. It can clash with current security protocols. While I'm sure that Yahoo wants to market their other services, I suspect there are more pragmatic reasons for making this change.
      • by russellh (547685)

        Seems pretty obvious to me. Yahoo has a standard way of doing things. Maintaining an old non-standard alternate way of doing things is a bitch. It can clash with current security protocols. While I'm sure that Yahoo wants to market their other services, I suspect there are more pragmatic reasons for making this change.

        True, and that's what users hate most about IT. standards that crush everything in their path, including the people. actual users hate an IT that pragmatically serves the interests of IT, rat

    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      You are missing the chance to stir up trouble in the hope of luring people over to your Flickr knockoff site, that's what you're missing.
    • It's a drag. (Score:4, Interesting)

      by Kadin2048 (468275) <slashdot...kadin@@@xoxy...net> on Thursday February 01, 2007 @03:50PM (#17848704) Homepage Journal
      One of my biggest problems with Flickr is that it requires a Yahoo ID.

      It's just obnoxious; it makes signing up for it into a much bigger deal, than making a one-shot account (like on Slashdot, or any other discrete service). It just makes it feel like more of a commitment.

      I can't tell you how many times I've had people ask me how they can comment on my Flickr photos, and I have to tell them that they need a Flickr name, and they look into it, until they realize it's going to mean getting a Yahoo ID, and that's a big turn off. (My entire family falls into this category; none of them want to get a Yahoo ID. Probably because they're confusing it with Yahoo Mail, but it doesn't matter. The point is people don't want one.)

      I always wished that I had got on to Flickr before the instituted the Yahoo ID requirement, because I can never remember what my idiotic Yahoo ID is (it's not the same as my Flickr username), and thus I really only ever use Flickr from computers that have it saved/cookied.

      Basically: Yahoo ID's are a drag. I don't want to "build a relationship" with Yahoo. I don't want any of their other crummy services. I just want Flickr, and so do a lot of other people. They've shot themselves in the foot with this requirement -- as I said, I personally know quite a few people who've decided not to touch Flickr because of the mandatory Yahoo ID -- and now they're going to make the hole a little bigger.
      • Re:It's a drag. (Score:5, Insightful)

        by JFitzsimmons (764599) <justin@fitzsimmons.ca> on Thursday February 01, 2007 @04:14PM (#17849056)
        I don't get it. What's stopping you from making a yahoo account and only using flickr?
        • by homer_ca (144738)
          That's what I thought too. Sure, Yahoo would like you to to log in to Flickr with a Yahoo account that you use for everything else because then they could aggregate all your browsing into a marketing profile, but Yahoo accounts are free and you don't have to give them any real personal info. Make one just for Flickr and clear your cookies if you log into another Yahoo account.
        • 1. They are a pain in the ass to sign up for.
          They have annoying CAPTCHAs, and their UI makes me want to stab people. The login name you'll probably end up with itself is long (since they have so many accounts, you generally can't get a compact username; you're stuck with JohnDoe48529), and unless you want an equally crappy Flickr username, your Flickr name and your Yahoo ID won't be the same (i.e. Flickr: JohnDoe, Yahoo: JohnDoe48529), which is confusing. It's just one more barrier to entry that keeps non-g
          • by carlivar (119811) on Thursday February 01, 2007 @07:22PM (#17852064)

            2. Psychologically, signing up for a "Yahoo ID" seems like a much bigger commitment than "making an account on Flickr."

            Huh? Psychologically? Is this a fancy way of saying "has no basis in fact"?

            If this is a "psychology" issue, I have a psychology word: crazy. As in, Flickr users are crazy.

      • by Ucklak (755284)
        One of my biggest problems is the fact that the UI sucks.

        Granted, a free image hosting site is great, I'm not knocking that.
        The UI is horrible and I can't stand albums that are on that site.

        There is some pretty amazing imagery there and it's a shame it's on such a sorry site.
        It feels incomplete.

        • Well it is in 'Gamma' stage for a reason...
    • Re:So? (Score:4, Informative)

      by metlin (258108) * on Thursday February 01, 2007 @04:01PM (#17848860) Journal
      Actually, it is a little more complex than that.

      The problem is that Yahoo! has a nasty habit of deleting accounts for a number of reasons, and there have been several instances of this happening [flickr.com].

      I've had my Yahoo! account disappearing, my mails disappearing etc. I guess when you've paid for the service (some of us Pro users) and have put in several years of effort uploading thousands of photographs (a lot of the pro users in Flickr are professional photographers), you are a little worried about your photos disappearing overnight.

      I wrote a detailed rant about it, The Flickr Fiasco - Why Yahoo! Should Learn to Listen to Its Customers [metlin.org].

      I guess it boils down to the fact that as paying customers, we thought our opinions would have a say in the matter. But it turns out that it does not, and they are going to go ahead and do something that almost the entire Old Skool userbase of Flickr is against. I do not know, I guess maybe I am being naive in some ways.

      *shrug*
      • Re:So? (Score:5, Insightful)

        by winkydink (650484) * <sv.dude@gmail.com> on Thursday February 01, 2007 @04:18PM (#17849136) Homepage Journal
        I guess when you've paid for the service (some of us Pro users) and have put in several years of effort uploading thousands of photographs (a lot of the pro users in Flickr are professional photographers), you are a little worried about your photos disappearing overnight.

        Wait a minute... are you telling me that there are professional photographers who store their content on Flickr and don't have backup copies? Excuse me, but that doesn't sound very professional. That sounds stupid.

        • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

          by metlin (258108) *
          Wait a minute... are you telling me that there are professional photographers who store their content on Flickr and don't have backup copies? Excuse me, but that doesn't sound very professional. That sounds stupid.

          You don't get it, do you? It's not just about backup - it is about everything else. The organization, the tags, the categorized way of storing your pictures.

          It is not merely the photos, but rather the meta-data. People who like photography put in a lot of work on their photos, and have them catego
          • Re:So? (Score:5, Insightful)

            by winkydink (650484) * <sv.dude@gmail.com> on Thursday February 01, 2007 @04:53PM (#17849676) Homepage Journal
            OK, you invested all this time in creating metadata and didn't back it up. And you're earning a living off it to some degree. Sorry, again, it's not very bright to not have a backup of the data that is critical to your continued success.

            • Re:So? (Score:4, Interesting)

              by metlin (258108) * on Thursday February 01, 2007 @05:23PM (#17850174) Journal
              OK, you invested all this time in creating metadata and didn't back it up.

              Some do, most don't. You assume that everyone who does photography know technology. There is no particularly easy way to backup all that meta-data, and it becomes harder still if you are not a techie.

              And you're earning a living off it to some degree.

              Some do, some don't.

              Sorry, again, it's not very bright to not have a backup of the data that is critical to your continued success.

              Perhaps, I can't say I disagree with that. But like I said, the idea behind being a paying customer is that you hope these situations do not come to pass (I pay you for a service, you provide that service well).

              Now, if this were a corporate account, such data loss would be met with lawsuits. Since it is individuals here, there isn't a whole lot people can do about it.

              At the end of the day, people are worried about the integrity of their data. Are there alternatives and possibilities for backup? Sure, but it's not something that can happen overnight.

              The only bone that people have to pick is that Flickr is moving to a company with a known trackrecord for poor data integrity, poor maintenance and lack of customer support. The reason that they gave us was a stupid one - that they wanted to give all the cool features that Yahoo! had. The point is, those that are interested in those features would have merged anyway, those of us who aren't don't particularly care.

              As original users, we were the first to be with Flickr before it became a part of Yahoo!, the first community. When Yahoo! bought Flickr, it wasn't just the service, it was also this community. By doing this, Flickr is essentially telling the community that helped it all along that it does not care for them anymore.

              Isn't there a lesson in business and usability about listening to your customers? Or something?
          • You don't get it, do you? It's not just about backup - it is about everything else. The organization, the tags, the categorized way of storing your pictures.
            Do they offer an API for exporting all of this valuable metadata? That's one thing that made it easy for me to get into del.icio.us a few years ago: no worries about being locked into their system. Of course del.icio.us has been acquired by Yahoo now, too, and as far as I know the APIs are all still there and quite usable!
        • by drinkypoo (153816)

          Wait a minute... are you telling me that there are professional photographers who store their content on Flickr and don't have backup copies? Excuse me, but that doesn't sound very professional. That sounds stupid.

          Stupid is when you make assumptions about what someone actually said instead of, you know, reading their comment.

          Even if you do have the pictures backed up, it takes a substantial amount of time to upload them to yahoo, tag them, title them, etc etc. Having all your hard work uploading and cate

        • that doesn't sound very professional. That sounds stupid

          Those two terms aren't mutually exclusive.

          I'm a professional photographer who knows better than to a) use Flickr at all, and b) store my photos on disks I don't control. Photography is no different from other professions, we have plenty of hacks who are able to earn a living despite knowing little more than where the shutter release is located.

          With the increasing number of cheap digital SLR bodies and even cheaper lenses to clamp on them I suspect this will only get worse in the coming years.

      • When I first encountered Flickr, it was in Beta stage, fine I thought, I will get a free account and see what happens when its complete. Fast forward to present day and its in Gamma stage, I've still not paid for the service. Why did you pay for a service which was a Beta product? Anything can and could happen. Have you ever bought beta software before and expected a flawless service, why expect something different now?

        Maybe its just me but I've already got a yahoo account so I didn't give a shit when Y
    • I was an early adopter of Flickr, and really liked it. The concept, the interface, the community, it was all great for my purposes. However, I really don't like today's Yahoo, either as a service provider, or as a company. This is for a multitude of reasons, most of which have been repeated ad nauseum here on /. and elsewhere.

      When Yahoo bought Flickr I didn't immediately jump ship. I did like the service, and it didn't seem that Yahoo had messed with things all that much. They seemed to be staying in
    • Re:So? (Score:5, Insightful)

      by crlove (857212) on Thursday February 01, 2007 @04:10PM (#17848982) Journal
      Thank you for saying what I was thinking. I was a very early adopter of Flickr, just converted to a Yahoo sign-in (which they've been suggesting you do anyway)when I received the email, and... that's it! I sign in with a different account name. No big deal.

      Pretty inflammatory title for a Slashdot article. I got confused when looking at my RSS feeds and thought I was seeing Digg's.

      • Same here. I have been a Flickr user for a very long time. Switching is not a big deal, so I don't understand this hatred at all. It isn't like Flickr is kicking people off or deleting their photos. And Flickr has given plenty of warning that this was coming; I think they have bent over backwards to try to accommodate people. Flickr is Yahoo; they are not separate entities so it makes sense to have a common login. Do people really hate Yahoo that much?

        I worked in retail for a long time and one thing I
        • by ejp1082 (934575)
          In fairness, it's a big deal for some.

          People who joined Flickr early got their preferred screen name. "MyPhotography123" or something like that, and built up an identity and reputation around that. Many people were complaining that the same screen name they had on Flickr isn't available on Yahoo, which suffers from 10+ years of people registering accounts with them and a refusal to retire dead ones.

          It also raises a larger issue of identity management: There are people who (for whatever reason) don't want th
          • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

            by Yakman (22964)
            Your Flickr screen name has nothing to do with your Yahoo! account name. I signed up for Flickr when it was still the "oldskool" login. They announced that they would be turning those off in preference for Y! logins not long after (this was a few years ago), but I guess it didn't happen. Either way I already had a Y! account which I didn't use much but it was there, so I converted the login across. Didn't have to change my Flickr name or anything else. On all the computers I use the cookie remembers who
    • by cmacb (547347)
      "Why would this bother anybody other than the tinfoil-hat types? What am I missing?"

      The problem is that this looks a lot like (because it probably is) a bait-and-switch tactic.

      When you get a Yahoo ID you also get a Yahoo e-mail address which you may not need or want. By default you also agree to be marketed to from a list of about 15 categories, and they ask some personal questions that many people would rather not answer. I have a Yahoo ID which I sign onto about once a month to delete the THOUSANDS of s
    • by AudioEfex (637163)
      I wouldn't call this "abandoning" anybody. They're asking users to use a (free) Yahoo login. It's not what I'd call a big deal. Yahoo did this when they acquired Launch (launch.com). Why would this bother anybody other than the tinfoil-hat types? What am I missing?

      You aren't missing anything. I'm actually embarrassed for /. because of the obvious slant of the title. They aren't "abandoning" anyone, and it's just a bunch of disgruntled people who like to complain about the little irrelevant crap in life

  • Question (Score:5, Insightful)

    by LMacG (118321) on Thursday February 01, 2007 @03:23PM (#17848148) Journal
    How does "require a different sign on method" equate to "abandon"?
    • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

      When you are emo everything relates to abandon.
    • by Salvance (1014001) *
      Primarily because the users are worried that they'll start getting a ton of unsolicited mail, popups, etc. while logged into the Yahoo network. If you're an "old skool" user, you can at least direct all messages to spam and won't be "logged in" after leaving flickr. My personal opinion is that Yahoo is evil, and will do everything possible to collect information about me while I'm surfing. Take their toolbar, or even worse, their purchase of MyBlogLog. Users view both as spying, and most want nothing to
  • S0? (Score:5, Informative)

    by geekoid (135745) <dadinportland@ya[ ].com ['hoo' in gap]> on Thursday February 01, 2007 @03:23PM (#17848150) Homepage Journal
    " Many users are calling this BS, saying it's all about Yahoo marketing its other properties to Flickr's user-base"

    Which is within their rights as the owner of said company.

    Jeez people, if you don't like it find another place to post pictures of your drunk cat.
  • Zoomr? (Score:5, Interesting)

    by BandwidthHog (257320) <inactive.slashdo ... icallyenough.com> on Thursday February 01, 2007 @03:28PM (#17848274) Homepage Journal
    I’ve been a fan of Mike Hawk’s photography for a while now, but man, Zoomr couldn’t really be a more blatant clone of Flickr if it tried.

    • I liked Flickr, but I hate Yahoo. It seems this couldn't be more perfect for me if it tried.
    • by Kadin2048 (468275)
      I think that's the point.

      It's Flickr, which a lot of people like, but without Yahoo, which a lot of people hate.

      I wonder if it works with the FlickrExport plugins for iPhoto and Aperture...if it does, I might be interested. I narrowly missed getting onto Flickr before the Yahoo buyout, and everyone seems pretty universally convinced that it's gone downhill since then. (Few features have been added, and those that have are of a blatantly revenue-generating nature, e.g. printing.)

      It's pretty obvious that Yaho
      • Re:Zoomr? (Score:4, Funny)

        by Hijacked Public (999535) * on Thursday February 01, 2007 @04:50PM (#17849630)

        Few features have been added, and those that have are of a blatantly revenue-generating nature


        What manner of abomination will be forced upon us next? Plagues of locusts? The earth yielding of its dead? Who knows what will come next when we live in a time when a for profit corporation can make a service available free of charge and then commit such obvious atrocities as trying to get some money back out of it.

        I, for one, just did not see this coming. I uploaded thousands of pictures to someone else's server and spent hours and hours and hours typing in metadata. Maybe I paid some kind of monthly fee and maybe I didn't, and maybe I read the User Agreement that stated that at any given time and for any reason, or no reason at all, the company that owns all this stuff I keep sending them can pull the plug on the whole works and all the work I put into it would be vaporized. Regardless, I expected that forever and ever this service would be made available to me, on terms set by me, by virtue of my having spent a lot of my time on it and becoming emotionally invested in its 'community'.

      • everyone seems pretty universally convinced that it's gone downhill since then. (Few features have been added, and those that have are of a blatantly revenue-generating nature, e.g. printing.)

        I wouldn't say universally. I can't think of a single instance where things have gone downhill. Features have definitely been added, and the site has become a lot more reliable. They used to have tons of downtime before they got the benefits of Yahoo's infrastructure.

        I don't think Flickr makes a lot of money from th
  • by slughead (592713) on Thursday February 01, 2007 @03:30PM (#17848304) Homepage Journal
    Much of the criticism is being lead by a prominent user named Thomas Hawk who also happens to be CEO of Zooomr, a direct competitor to Flickr.

    I'm sorry, was this supposed to reinforce the "OMG YAHOO IS EVIL" slant of this /. post?

    So a guy who's competing with Yahoo says Yahoo sucks? ... ? ... Anyone else see a possible problem in his motivation for saying something like this?
    • by CmdrGravy (645153)
      Not only that his every second post also seems to drop in the fact that Zoooomr is an amazing alternative to Flickr !

      I went there to see and the site just sat there with a little loading icon in the corner and refused to do anything else ! Maybe it was overwhelmed or something but that's not an ideal advertisment.
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by nine-times (778537)

      I'm sorry, was this supposed to reinforce the "OMG YAHOO IS EVIL" slant of this /. post?

      Seems more like an ad to me. "Yahoo is evil. Oh, by the way, on a totally unrelated topic, I have a competing product...."

    • "Anyone else see..."

      Everyone else saw it. They were trying to make that point. Glad you caught it.

  • by drinkypoo (153816) <martin.espinoza@gmail.com> on Thursday February 01, 2007 @03:30PM (#17848308) Homepage Journal

    Hey, we already have a term for these people, let's call a spade a spade, and a coward a coward.

    With that said; if you paid for this service, vote with your dollars, and go pay someone else. If you're using a free account, stop bitching. They're giving it to you for free! If they want you to identify yourself by your high school nickname, you should be grateful... even if they did call you "logger [b3ta.com]".

    • by TubeSteak (669689)

      If you're using a free account, stop bitching. They're giving it to you for free!

      Ummm... in many cases, it's the large body of free users that creates a situation where a company can offer for-fee accounts & draw in people who are willing to pay for one.

      If all of Flickr's free users fled overnight... well, there's goes the social part of the Flickr experience.

      I suspect that didn't occur to you when you wrote your post. It's easy to just say STFU leecher, but there's more to a community than who's payin

      • by drinkypoo (153816)

        I suspect that didn't occur to you when you wrote your post. It's easy to just say STFU leecher, but there's more to a community than who's paying for what.

        No, my point is that pissing, moaning, and whining won't help you no matter how many pairs of lips you have. The only thing that can help you is to DO something about it. All the whiners complaining about how evil Yahoo is but not leaving are showing the entire world what the clever people have already figured out, namely that you can abuse people quit

    • by Thuktun (221615)

      Week one was spent checking out the fit birds who came from the other schools, [...]

      We met a lad on our first day who was introduced as Logger. Initially he seemed more popular than most of the council estate white trash I schooled with, as alot of his junior school mates seemed at pains to introduce him to the rest of the school.

      In hindsight, I ought to have been suspicious, this was, after all, the eighties, "john's not mad" was still fresh in our pre adolescent minds, and "joey deacon" was still the insult de jour.

      Hooodam, that's some kinda furrin speak, there.

    • Ok, that's fair in regards to the free users, but what about the paying users? If you were paying $XX a month or a year for a service and one of those services is a being about to use a non-Yahoo ID login, then wouldn't you be a bit annoyed when they change the rules on you? Personally, I can see where a lot of the paying users are coming from - if you are paying for a service and they change the rules on you they should either give you a chance to get your money back or find a way to provide a compromise
      • I've failed repeatedly to understand why people paid a subscription service for a Beta product in the first place. Its in Gamma now.
  • by grenz (969305) on Thursday February 01, 2007 @03:30PM (#17848312)
    Is it really that serious an issue when the man leading the charge is the CEO of a rival company? Next you'll be telling me that the CEO of AMD thinks that Intel is making inferior products.
    • by xENoLocO (773565) *
      eh, "CEO".... isn't the kid 17?
      • by drinkypoo (153816)

        eh, "CEO".... isn't the kid 17?

        Eh, "Regent of Macedonia"... isn't the kid [wikipedia.org] 16?

        Your ageism is as unwelcome as sexism or racism. Correct yourself.

        • by imsabbel (611519)
          Sorry, no.
          The only peolpe i have ever seen to bitch about "ageism" are 15 year old assholes that really live up to all those stereotypes.
          Hint: after puperty you will be smarter, so shut up now.
          • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

            by drinkypoo (153816)

            Sorry, no. The only peolpe i have ever seen to bitch about "ageism" are 15 year old assholes that really live up to all those stereotypes.

            Well, I'm 29. So now you have seen someone else say it, and now you need to stop claiming that no one over 15 ever complained about ageism. Although frankly, I'm quite sure that many others over the age of 15 have complained to you, and you're simply a liar.

            Hint: after puperty you will be smarter, so shut up now.

            Point the first: s/peolpe/people/, s/puperty/puberty/

            P

  • Prominent user, eh? (Score:5, Interesting)

    by hpa (7948) on Thursday February 01, 2007 @03:32PM (#17848336) Homepage

    Much of the criticism is being lead by a prominent user named Thomas Hawk who also happens to be CEO of Zooomr, a direct competitor to Flickr.
    Am I the only one who finds it strange that the CEO of a direct competitor would be a prominent user of Flickr?
    • by jandrese (485)
      Have you seen Zoomr? It's obvious that he's spending a lot of time on Flickr just copying every single design element from them.
      • by suffe (72090)
        Actually he entered the Zoomr picture after the base flickr-rippof-design was in place. He doesn't show any signs of wanting to diverge from there, but it most certainly is not his creation.
    • Am I the only one who finds it strange that the CEO of a direct competitor would be a prominent user of Flickr?
      You don't think companies keep track of what their competitors do? [wikipedia.org]
    • But I've started projects simply because an idea *I* really liked wasn't quite done in the way I thought would be best. Then you've got the uphill battle of competing with a likely pretty good service thats already entrenched.

      I don't know this guy or his scruples, but that *could* be a reasonable scenario (or he's just a jerk).
    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by oliderid (710055)
      It looks like the guy was a heavy flickr user before launching/joining zooomr.. He claimed to have written books on flickr and leading several groups/forums inside this web service.

      Anyway...This is a new marketing strategy. If he did this intentionally , he is a genius.

      All he had to do is :
      - To write an article on his blog. Just to say how these modifications piss him off.
      - To choose a catchy title
      - Post it on digg.com (yes, self digg)
      - Use RSS
      - And to mention that he is the CEO of a competitor.

      So simple...
    • by kabocox (199019)
      Much of the criticism is being lead by a prominent user named Thomas Hawk who also happens to be CEO of Zooomr, a direct competitor to Flickr.
      Am I the only one who finds it strange that the CEO of a direct competitor would be a prominent user of Flickr?


      I just took it to mean that even though Flickr now sucks, it doesn't suck nearly as hard and as much as his service Zoomr.
  • I'm out (Score:2, Redundant)

    by z80 (103328)
    I registered very early for Flickr, back when it was in beta and you could email the founders with questions and get a reply within five minutes. I became a paying member last year but this fsckup with the Yahoo login (I don't like, or trust, Yahoo) made me delete my Flickr account.

  • Storm in a tea cup (Score:5, Informative)

    by CmdrGravy (645153) on Thursday February 01, 2007 @03:37PM (#17848448) Homepage
    The amount of wailing and hair pulling going on over this in the Flickr forums is simply awe inspiring, it's really amusing to see the number of people with no sense of perspective whatsoever.

    Anyone who posts a comment such as the one I am about launch into is shouted down immediately and called all sorts of nasty names, this is less amusing and simply disturbing.

    It's no big deal, the only difference is that people now have to log in through Yahooo rather than Flickr maintaning a separate login system just for them. Nothing else has changed, the Flickr experience is identical from that moment onwards.

    Common complaints are

    1) Yahoo will log me off all the time
    2) I don't want a "silly" Yahoo login name
    3) I am genetically incapable of remembering any more logins
    4) I will lose my "old skool" status and reputation
    5) Yahoo will send me spam all the time
    6) Yahoo are evil and I'm so right on I don't support evil

    To which the answers are

    1) No it won't ( I have a Yahoo login to Flickr and it has stayed logged in for months now )
    2) You still keep your flickr screen name, no one will see your Yahoo name
    3) You won't have to remember your old Flickr login anymore and thus have more room in your impoverished memory for a new one
    4) Since you are the only person who sees how you login this is a stupid claim based on a worrying sense of misplaced elitism
    5) I've had Yahoo e-mail since 1999 and can't remember ever getting any spam off them in all that time and if you don't want to use the e-mail you don't even have to sign up for it
    6) Yahoo have owned Flickr for over a year now so if you don't support them on moral grounds why are you still using Flickr in the first place ?

    This "old skool" thing is simply ridiculous, ok so you discovered Flickr maybe 6 months before other people did - there are no prizes for this and it has no effect whatsoever on your value to society or as a person in general !

    Seriously, they really should just shut up and change their login or shut up and find something else which is happy to accept a huge bunch of whining holier than thou nuisances. Either way they should shut up because it's quite unpleasant listening to this caterwauling.
    • There is a valid complaints. First, I hate having all kinds of different usernames across different sites. I'd much rather log in using my email address than some arbitrary name. It reduces the amount of information I have to remember. And for photo sharing sites, I'd much rather use my actual email address than some arbitrary yahoo ID because I don't get email there.

      As someone who develops web apps professionally, I always recommend using your email address as your username, even if the "screen name" that


  • > "Many users are calling this BS, saying it's all about Yahoo marketing its other properties to Flickr's user-base."

    And this is somehow unacceptable? They're a portal with multiple service offerings.
    They also gain tremendous synergies from integrating these services, as do all portals.

    Why does the OP feel he has the right to be shielded somehow from this integration, or from
    Yahoo's other free service offerings?

    This is a little OT, but I have to say that personally I think Yahoo is on a tear and no one
    • by NullProg (70833)
      And this is somehow unacceptable? They're a portal with multiple service offerings.
      They also gain tremendous synergies from integrating these services, as do all portals.


      You forgot to say they also...

      optimize seamless communities
      generate vertical e-services
      leverage synergistic convergence

          and best of all

      engage e-business content

      Enjoy,

  • Seems like rather an important tid-bit at the end there...

    "Much of the criticism is being lead by a prominent user named Thomas Hawk who also happens to be CEO of Zooomr, a direct competitor to Flickr."

    So, they are further integrating Flickr into Yahoo, what's wrong or surprising about that?
  • when I got my home at&t/yahoo adsl account, they made my synch my yahoo chat and myyahoo login id with the signon and email. guesss they know what I'm doing now
  • When they merged with SBC, i used to have a pacbell.net login and email address but after the merger they wanted me to create a new yahoo ID to use instead.. i just ignored them for my main account, but for sub accounts i followed suit and was rewarded with a host of "free" applications that they wanted me to install to continue using their services (although direct setup of POP3 still works) and a new "improved" home page type "portal" that was full of obtrusive ads. UGH!

    If I didn't game so much I might ha
    • by stu42j (304634)
      If you had switched to Comcast you'd be switching all over again to Time Warner.
  • by Splork (13498) on Thursday February 01, 2007 @03:47PM (#17848626) Homepage
    i've been using a yahoo login on flickr for years. i receive -zero- marketing from yahoo and the login process is hidden anyways since a cookie stored in my browser keeps me logged in. theres no reason to dislike this change. get over it.

  • SmugMug (Score:3, Informative)

    by 3m_w018 (1002627) on Thursday February 01, 2007 @03:48PM (#17848654) Homepage
    I've been pretty happy with these guys:

    http://www.smugmug.org/ [smugmug.org]

    Granted, they don't have the kind of communities that Flickr does, but I find them more than sufficient for my photos...

  • Awe-inspiring (Score:5, Interesting)

    by aftk2 (556992) on Thursday February 01, 2007 @03:53PM (#17848756) Homepage Journal
    The gnashing of teeth over these decisions is simply awe-inspiring. Basically, the points of contention boil down to:
    1. Flickr wants you to signin with a yahoo account.
    2. Flickr will limit you to 3000 contacts.
    3. Flickr will limit the number of tags on your photos to 75.

    That's it. In response:
    1. Jesus. Just get a Yahoo ID. Can't find your precious flickr ID on Yahoo (since Yahoo has a mizillion members)? Just take your ID and add "flickr" at the end. It'll probably be available. You can still get email updates at whatever email address you like, and this change doesn't change anything about your nickname on the site! This is LITERALLY a change to the login process, and ONLY the login process.

    2. I suspect this measure is probably the first move in Flickr announcing some other social networking features (Friends or some such, some other data type), that will allow you to do much the same thing you do with contacts, allowing contacts to be, you know, PEOPLE YOU FUCKING CONTACT!

    3. This move is great. Using the Flickr API can get downright stupid when you attempt to browse a tag and the same damn pictures come up, because some unattractive lady has tagged her picture with a million different keywords. Stop tagspam.

    Seriously...what a pathetic display of whining (the vast majority) and opportunism (Mr. Hawk)
    • by hxnwix (652290)
      1. Users don't want it.

      2. Users don't want it.

      3. Users don't want it.

      4. Users don't want it.

      5. Users don't want it.

      6. Users don't want it.

      7. Shills don't want it.

      8. Apologists say that it's not that bad.

      9. Yahoo tried this before but were repulsed by their own users.

      10. This is change for the sake of cross marketing benefits, not for reduction of image tag spam.
  • Alternatives? (Score:2, Informative)

    by dcormier (556305)

    I am [flickr.com] an old skool member (as Flickr likes to call us) and I'm serriously considering ditching my Flickr account for something else, even though just last week I paid for a 1 year Pro account. I was considering doing this before I saw anything by Thomas Hawk. I have a number [flickr.com] of reasons [flickr.com].

    The problem is finding something else.

    I've looked at Zooomr [zooomr.com]. I found it a bit slugish and unpolished. I don't mind that, but I wasn't encouraged when I could find no obvious way to contact someone with suggestions or ques

  • its better than flikr anyway.

  • I thought this was a good translation of the yahoo /flickr letter.

    http://strange.corante.com/archives/2007/01/31/yah ooflickr_get_the_bullyboy_tactics_out.php [corante.com]
  • by Dan100 (1003855) on Thursday February 01, 2007 @04:34PM (#17849374) Homepage
    Until yesterday I was also an "old skool" member (and I'm also a Pro account owner). When I got the mail announcing the change, I thought a bit about for a while then said "sod it" and merged my account.

    Was there any difference in my Flickr experience after the switch? No.

  • First, this is not a big deal - Yahoo account is completely separate from Flickr account (which is not deleted if not used, for instance) and you can even name another account as your primary account for information e-mail. "Old school" members can keep their Flickr sign-in names and everything. And they even promised to enable users to move their Flickr accounts to different Yahoo accounts later on. So, really, get over it.

    But I wanted to say something for a long time - I get spam because of del.icio.us
  • I just created a Yahoo account, and merged my Flickr account with it. I'll never use this Yahoo account for anything else, so I guess it's not that big a deal - but by default they do opt you into a bunch of crap.

    So you might want to go into your Yahoo account preferences and opt back out of all the stuff they try to tie you into.

  • by oasisweb (924178) on Thursday February 01, 2007 @05:15PM (#17850034)
    The change may be small, but it is significant. This brings back bad memories of yahoo's takeover of webring.org nearly a decade ago. Their first step was also to integrate yahoo IDs. I don't know if anyone here remembers or even used webring, but back then it was a cool concept. I had a ring there with several thousand members, and I could not secure a single new member after the takeover. Soon they began to push for a "migration" to yahoo accounts and servers, but it was riddled with problems, and I ended up losing control of the ring. They eventually backed out of webring, but it was never the same again. That was actually when I started hating yahoo. They just came along, took a beautiful idea, and totally ruined it. It was brutal.

    The flickr takeover has actually been far smoother than I had expected, and I'm surprised that they didn't try to yahooify flickr (too much, at least). Still, I hope this change isn't a sign of further changes or "integrations". If I wanted my photo album "integrated" with yahoo services, I would use yahoo photos. Flickr is successful because of what it is right now. Just let it be, and don't try to change that. Yahoo's "better" isn't necessarily our "better". It's always a pity when corporate interests intervene and destroy great ideas.
  • Users with old accounts see flickr adverts but not yahoo mail adverts, and they are less likely to be sucked into using other yahoo services. Even though this move will drive away some users, bless their hearts, it may still be profitable: yahoo id users see more adverts than legacy users.

    Assuming that legacy users don't otherwise use yahoo, that 1/3rd of the legacy users will never use flickr again and that yahoo id users see 2x the adverts, this will be a win. Of course, some stubborn people don't like
  • by grrrl (110084) on Thursday February 01, 2007 @09:55PM (#17853664)
    Face it, people just hate Yahoo.

    I use flickr (I have a Yahoo login) and basically I try to pretend that Yahoo doesn't own it (I stopped bothering geotagging after about 5 photos when I realised how crap Yahoo maps are and how slow the tagging was).

    I can understand why people are pissed - because they don't want to associate themselves with Yahoo. It doesn't matter that Flickr is owned by Yahoo, that's just an unhappy side effect. I for one would be happy to keep as far away from yahoo as possible. I would rather not even have my username present in the Yahoo system.

    I feel the same way about google buying blogspot - I have a crappy blog I hope noone reads, but there is no way I want to merge it with my google account - (sure it's pretty easy to link the two given they have the _same username_) but like some posts above, I'd like to keep some semblance of anominity on the internet - I don't want every fucking account linked together. Sure anyone who is interested can search for my username on some other random site and see if I ahve an account, but I cringe at the thought of the day when you can't even make an account somewhere like flickr without every single other one of your internet presences being linked to it.

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