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US Group Wants Canada Blacklisted Over Piracy 585

Posted by samzenpus
from the are-you-on-the-list dept.
An anonymous reader writes "Following up on an earlier story, the IIAA wants to add Canada to a blacklist of the worst intellectual property offenders. A powerful coalition of U.S. software, movie and music producers is urging the Bush administration to put Canada on an infamous blacklist of intellectual property villains, alongside China, Russia and Belize. 'Canada's chronic failure to modernize its copyright regime has made it a global hub for bootleg movies, pirated software and tiny microchips that allow video-game users to bypass copyright protections', the International Intellectual Property Alliance complains in a submission to the U.S. government."
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US Group Wants Canada Blacklisted Over Piracy

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  • by QuantumG (50515) * <qg@biodome.org> on Wednesday February 14, 2007 @07:51PM (#18018162) Homepage Journal
    As opposed to those huge microchips you get from Intel.
  • by esampson (223745) on Wednesday February 14, 2007 @07:52PM (#18018172) Homepage
    Oh, sure.
     

    Blame Canada

    • Re:Cue the music (Score:5, Insightful)

      by antarctican (301636) on Wednesday February 14, 2007 @08:01PM (#18018256) Homepage
      I just fail to understand why we should care (from a Canadian point of view). Why should we let the Americans control our internal policy?

      I'm offended and frankly would be extremely angry if Canada bowed to this pressure.
      • Re:Cue the music (Score:5, Informative)

        by Telvin_3d (855514) on Wednesday February 14, 2007 @08:25PM (#18018540)
        Well then, make sure your MP knows that you do not support the actions of the current heritage minister Bev Oda. As the person who sets policy for copyright in Canada she has been cught accepting large sums of money ('campaign funding') from American entertainment companies. At the same time, she has refused to meet with almost any groups who represent actual Canadaian artists. Michael Geist has some great reporting on the issue. Check out http://www.michaelgeist.ca/content/view/1564/ [michaelgeist.ca] and http://www.michaelgeist.ca/content/view/1529/ [michaelgeist.ca] to start, but there is much more there.
        • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

          by Beached (52204)
          It is illegal for Canadian political parties and their members to accept donations greater than a $1000CDN. Also, they must be from individuals. Yes, you could try and get a whole family to each donate a grand each but that is still on average $4200(two parents and two point two children). And that has been done. But nothing I would call huge.

          Still, she has been very pro Big Media in her speeches.
        • Re:Cue the music (Score:5, Informative)

          by Hemogoblin (982564) on Wednesday February 14, 2007 @11:12PM (#18019816)
          Dr. Geist has a blog entry on the IIPA report here [michaelgeist.ca].

          Heres a good bit: "The U.S. approach is quite clearly one of "do what I say, not what I do" (fair use is good for the U.S., but no one else), advising country after country that it does not meet international TPM standards (perhaps it is the U.S. that is not meeting emerging international standards), and criticizing national attempts to improve education or culture through exceptions or funding programs. Moreover, it is very clear that the U.S. lobby groups are never satisfied as even those countries that have ratified the WIPO treaties or entered into detailed free trade agreements with the U.S. that include IP provisions still find themselves criticized for not doing enough.

          Canadians should not be deceived into thinking that our laws are failing to meet an international standard, no matter what U.S. lobby groups or the Globe and Mail say. Rather, Canadians should know that our approach - and the criticism that it inevitably brings from the U.S. - places us in very good company.
          "
      • Re:Cue the music (Score:5, Insightful)

        by narrowhouse (1949) on Wednesday February 14, 2007 @08:27PM (#18018568) Homepage
        Really that is exactly the point, some industries would like as many countries as possible to have almost identical copyright and patent policies. Lately those industries have had the most luck influencing U.S. law so they have decided to make those laws the template. It isn't the "Americans" that are pushing this, it is a collection of huge corporations that are trying to keep from having to fight the same court battles over and over. If they can convince the U.S. government to pressure other countries to bring their laws "in line" with the U.S. laws they make their own lives a lot easier. If Canada keeps it's own laws it will be a force these industries have to deal with directly, if Canada bows to pressure they fade into the background, another "me too" country they never have to work with. Australia should think about that too.
        • Re:Cue the music (Score:5, Insightful)

          by ScrewMaster (602015) on Wednesday February 14, 2007 @08:36PM (#18018656)
          More to the point from my perspective as an American, most of the companies involved in this are not American, or even based in the United States. Personally, the very idea of our political leaders accepting bribes^H^H^H^H^H^Hcompaign contributions from foreign interests in exchange for modifications to our legal system smacks of high treason. Of course, that doesn't make this any less the responsibility of the citizenry of this country to fix ... as soon as we figure out how. Voting doesn't seem to work so well anymore.
        • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

          by renegadesx (977007)
          Its too late for Australia. Problem is John Howard is so far up Bush's ass he wont be able to taste anything but shit till his 80'th birthday (next week I think) He has been pushing so hard to pretty much make Australia another US state, which sucks because so many Aussies hate America, but our ruler loves those yanks and wants us to be just like them
          • Re:Cue the music (Score:5, Insightful)

            by ScrewMaster (602015) on Thursday February 15, 2007 @12:03AM (#18020086)
            Do they hate America, do they hate that for which America has traditionally stood, or do they just hate George W. Bush and his cronies? Just in case it's news to you, a lot of us Americans aren't all that enamored of GWB and Co.

            In any event, saying "we hate America" means you're doing one awful lot of hating. I've known some Australians that were complete jackasses as well ... but I don't say "I hate Australia". I just express distaste for those particular idiots.
            • I don't think that nobody with a rational mind can really hate America or Americans. Yes it's true that American government does from time to time very fucked up things. Yes it's true that most Americans seem more or less ignorant or straight stupid from the eyes of the rest of the world. Even so, that really doesn't make justifiable to hate America or Americans. When you look at other nations and previous superpowers, they have done and do same things and at times have seemed to the rest of the world as bu
          • by Robber Baron (112304) on Thursday February 15, 2007 @02:14AM (#18020752) Homepage

            John Howard is so far up Bush's ass he wont be able to taste anything but shit till his 80'th birthday
            Actually no, it should be "he's so far up Bush's ass he can see Tony Blair's feet".
      • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

        by Quantam (870027)
        I just fail to understand why we should care (from a Canadian point of view). Why should we let the Americans control our internal policy?

        One word: nukes. The US has them; you don't.
      • Re:Cue the music (Score:5, Insightful)

        by Jerry (6400) on Wednesday February 14, 2007 @10:33PM (#18019582)
        And more to the point: Why does the American government allow corporations to dictate foreign policy?

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by RexRhino (769423)
        Since about 50% of all economic activity in Canada involves the United States in some way, it is definitly in Canadas economic interest to care. That doesn't nessicarily mean that Canada should change its current copyright system for the U.S., but it does mean that if Canada tries a pissing match with the U.S. about this, the U.S. can put some serious pressure on Canada. It means that Canada has to deal with the problem diplomaticly and shrudely, and not play into the typical Canadian inferiority complex an
      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by someone1234 (830754)
        Isn't Canada in the process of tightening its copyright law? This really sounds like pressure, i wonder why it was needed, the bribes didn't work?
    • Re:Cue the music (Score:5, Interesting)

      by kfg (145172) on Wednesday February 14, 2007 @08:19PM (#18018488)
      The funny part is that until the 1970s it was the US that was the "rogue" nation on the international blacklist (and even had the gall to be proud of it), because it still held somewhat to the quaint ideas delineated in the Bill of Rights which are antithetical to a "guild" system of intellectual property.

      Europe is the crucible from which "modern" (it's really fuedal, thus old fashioned, but what the hell. Nobody remembers anything before last Thursday anyway) copyright law was cast, but it's the converts that are almost always the biggest PITA fanatics; especially if there's money and power in it for them.

      KFG
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by saskboy (600063)
      That reminds me, I need to download a movie.

      Thank goodness for Bit Torrent, and freedom in Canada.
    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by Anonymous Coward
      Celine Dion, Bryan Adams, Avril Lavine, Nickelback, Alanis Morisette, Shania Twain...

      Surely they should be blacklisted for the above atrocities to mankind.
      • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

        by Robber Baron (112304)

        Celine Dion, Bryan Adams, Avril Lavine, Nickelback, Alanis Morisette, Shania Twain...

        Surely they should be blacklisted for the above atrocities to mankind.
        Oh yeah? Britney Spears. That alone is reason enough for your country to be thoroughly nuked so it can't ever happen again.
  • Tough choice (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Dorceon (928997) on Wednesday February 14, 2007 @07:55PM (#18018200)
    1. Copyright Law
    2. Business Model
    Modernize one.
  • by stimpleton (732392) on Wednesday February 14, 2007 @07:56PM (#18018204)
    A friend and I have discussed whether Canada is part of the Axis of Evil.

    We concurred Yes. And reading this article just confirmed it, eh?
  • by davmoo (63521) on Wednesday February 14, 2007 @07:57PM (#18018216)
    Apparently the editors of that press release got it backwards...its the US that has a "copyright regime". What they meant to say was Canada has "realistic and fair copyright laws, and we cannot accept that".
  • in other words (Score:4, Insightful)

    by President_Camacho (1063384) on Wednesday February 14, 2007 @07:57PM (#18018218) Homepage
    'Canada's chronic failure to modernize its copyright regime has made it a global hub for bootleg movies, pirated software and tiny microchips that allow video-game users to bypass copyright protections'

    Translation: "We have a stranglehold on the music and movie industries, we want control over video game consoles, as well."
    • Re:in other words (Score:5, Insightful)

      by grcumb (781340) on Wednesday February 14, 2007 @08:10PM (#18018372) Homepage Journal

      'Canada's chronic failure to modernize its copyright regime has made it a global hub for bootleg movies, pirated software and tiny microchips that allow video-game users to bypass copyright protections'

      Translation: "We have a stranglehold on the music and movie industries, we want control over video game consoles, as well."

      No, a better translation would be:

      The Conservative government needs a stick to shake at the Canadian public in order to cow them into accepting a digital media market that is more conducive to the desires of their corporate master. Conveniently, the media associations and their government cronies are happy to provide one.

  • by abscissa (136568) on Wednesday February 14, 2007 @07:58PM (#18018226)
    ... and all other people of the world, when I say that we just LOVE having Americans try to police us and control our affairs!
  • OH NOS!!! (Score:5, Funny)

    by Frogbert (589961) <frogbert@@@gmail...com> on Wednesday February 14, 2007 @07:58PM (#18018228)
    Don't put us on your list! Whatever will we do if you put our countries name on a list? I mean I might fly to another country and the people there could say "Hey! That guys country is on a LIST! Kill him!"

    It could, and probably will, happen.
  • by sugarmotor (621907) on Wednesday February 14, 2007 @07:59PM (#18018244) Homepage
    The article about "blacklisting Canada" appears on the front page of the same paper, the Globe and Mail.

    On the same page is another article, "For today's family, time's not on their side -- Hectic schedules, longer work weeks contribute to less togetherness than in 80s".

    All right, say it again - both of these are on the front page of the Globe and Mail!

    That's why I call it a "humour paper". (However, the National Post is actually funnier!)

    Stephan
  • by rainman_bc (735332) on Wednesday February 14, 2007 @08:01PM (#18018260)
    David Wilkins ( US Ambassador to Canada), who states that Canada doesn't dictate US policy should now go put his head back in his ass. Read about Maher Arar and the ass hattery that came out of David Wilkins mouth.

    If Canada doesn't dictate US policy, so too should the US not concern themselves with Canadian policies.
  • My Favorite quote (Score:5, Interesting)

    by grasshoppa (657393) <skennedy@@@tpno-co...org> on Wednesday February 14, 2007 @08:02PM (#18018278) Homepage
    "The problem of unauthorized camcording of films in Canadian theatres is now nearing crisis levels," the group complained.

    Crisis levels? People are dying?

    No, it's a fucking camcorder recording of a hollywood movie. All the bad things about watching the movie in the theator in the privacy of your own home.

    If this is really a problem, it's because the movies suck and early word getting out about how bad the movie is is hurting sales. Simple solution to that; Stop making crap movies.
    • Re:My Favorite quote (Score:5, Interesting)

      by TFloore (27278) on Thursday February 15, 2007 @12:59AM (#18020406)
      a fucking camcorder recording of a hollywood movie

      There's a missing note of hilarity here. Let me modify your statement slightly so you'll see it.

      a fucking camcorder recording of a hollywood movie that was filmed in Canada because it is cheaper there

      Are you laughing now? The US is exporting IP-related jobs to a country it claims doesn't respect IP.

      Personally, I think that's a great joke.
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by Digital Vomit (891734)

      Camcorder copies of Hollywood movies is not something the government has any business discussing. There are tons of real problems that they should be spending their time trying to solve. It's like complaining the contractors painted your house the wrong color while hundreds of nuclear warheads are on their way to obliterate your country.

      To the people in government that are discussing copyright crap: shut the hell up about non-issues like camcorder copies of movies and get your asses back to work trying t

  • by whitehatlurker (867714) on Wednesday February 14, 2007 @08:05PM (#18018312) Journal
    FTFA:

    The problem of unauthorized camcording of films in Canadian theatres is now nearing crisis levels

    What is a "crisis level" for camcorders in movie theatres? Is that where the people behind you start attacking you for using a camera that makes too much noise (or gives off too much light, or what)?

    Nonetheless, if this sanction was imposed, Canada could retaliate by putting the Yanks on the list of countries to whom they won't export oil or uranium. Then the Americans would have to nicer to Chavez ... (This won't happen. By "this" I mean Canada blocking energy exports. The Canadians put up with a lot.)

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by Dunbal (464142)
      Canada could retaliate by putting the Yanks on the list of countries to whom they won't export oil or uranium.

            Oil they can get elsewhere. You want to see them squirm, cut off their supply of nickel. Canada is the largest producer in the world of that metal.
  • by tomstdenis (446163) <tomstdenis@@@gmail...com> on Wednesday February 14, 2007 @08:06PM (#18018330) Homepage
    You mean the industry that rakes in more than the movie and music industries ... COMBINED?

    You mean the one that rakes in more and more profits each year?

    Yeah, piracy is just SUCH a problem, crippling that industry...

    And Canada doesn't need any new policy since it's already a civil offence to violate the copyright of another.

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by QRDeNameland (873957)
      Don't forget about porn, which accounts for something like 60% of all P2P traffic. By far, porn is the most pirated form of IP, yet does not seem to be in any danger of disappearing.
      • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

        by A_Non_Moose (413034)
        Don't forget about porn, which accounts for something like 60% of all P2P traffic.
        By far, porn is the most pirated form of IP, yet does not seem to be in any danger of disappearing.


        Well, in order to have the law enforced, you have to be caught red handed...errr...there has to be
        a smoking gun...ummm *coff*...dang, too hard (shit, did it again) to phrase it just right.

        (/quietly exits thread)
  • by UnknownSoldier (67820) on Wednesday February 14, 2007 @08:06PM (#18018332)
    "failure to modernize its copyright regime" ??

    Canada's copyright system is MORE modern then the US. Common sense tells us that there is no difference "If I loan a CD to a friend to listen to", or "make a copy for him to listen to." I guess we should ban libraries too since the artist is not getting "his fair share."

    Copyright & Intellectual Property Rights (which are neither property nor rights) are artificial rights from a world where only people care about greed, instead of sharing knowledge.

    What price do you put on a patent that could cure cancer? Why is it OK to profit off the sick & dying? Have we really made that little progress in the past million years, that we still cry & whine like a 2 year saying "mine" -- simply because we were the first to come up with an idea, that we could care less about our fellow human beings??

    Copyright: Because it's _such_ a crime against humanity, that people want to share what they find entertaining with others, for free!

    --
    Because its easier to get mod'd down for having the courage to look at the facts, then ignore Forgotten Christian History [peopleofhonoronly.com].
    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by dryeo (100693)
      Actually in Canada it is illegal for you to copy a CD for your friend (it is distributing). What is legal is to let your friend make a copy for their self.
      Really this is all about forcing us to have a DMCA type law on the books.
  • by Cocoshimmy (933014) on Wednesday February 14, 2007 @08:08PM (#18018352)
    Canada isn't the only nation with slack copyright laws. What about, say Romania, which publically declared [theinquirer.net] that they built their country on piracy. Or for example Sweden which hasn't been cracking down on piracy either?

    But that is besides the point. This is just yet another attempt by a US lobby to try to use the US government to boss Canada around.
  • by rumblin'rabbit (711865) on Wednesday February 14, 2007 @08:09PM (#18018362) Journal
    So they want Bush to blacklist Canada, their biggest trading partner (last I heard), their NATO ally, whose troops are now fighting in Afghanistan against the Taliban, possessor of the second largest petroleum reserves in the world, and whose government is one of the very few who are not overtly hostile to the Bush administration?


    Over video games?

    Cool.

    • by Kjella (173770) on Wednesday February 14, 2007 @08:29PM (#18018582) Homepage
      So they want Bush to blacklist Canada, their biggest trading partner (last I heard), their NATO ally, whose troops are now fighting in Afghanistan against the Taliban, possessor of the second largest petroleum reserves in the world, and whose government is one of the very few who are not overtly hostile to the Bush administration?

      Over video games?

      Cool.


      Just wait until they come to "liberate" you from your outdated copyright regime.

      Biggest trading partner? Haliburton is ready to take over that.
      NATO ally? Pay attention to how well they treat their EU allies lately.
      Fighting terrorists? So did Saddam, didn't want any religious fundies opposing him.
      Oil? And that's a.... con?
      Friendly government? Wasn't that a WMD pointing at the US I saw, I'm sure I did.

      And the five-year forecast: Civil war between eskimos, quebecois and english-speaking canadians.
  • treaty obligations? (Score:5, Interesting)

    by j1m+5n0w (749199) on Wednesday February 14, 2007 @08:14PM (#18018420) Homepage Journal
    It would be interesting to know just what Canada's obligations are under the Berne convention [wikipedia.org] or any other IP treaties they may have signed. Is this just a bunch of large corporations whining that the rights they think they ought to have aren't universally recognized, or is Canada actually breaking a treaty obligation? Or is the Berne convention sufficiently vague that both sides can plausibly believe they are right? What if a country doesn't want to participate in the Berne convention or trips [wikipedia.org] anymore? (The US didn't sign on until 1989, now we're trying to force our IP laws on everyone else.)
  • by Kjella (173770) on Wednesday February 14, 2007 @08:15PM (#18018444) Homepage
    ...but I don't know where to start, by size or notority.

    SE Asia is pretty much one big pool of piracy all around.
    China is a huge one, they don't seem to care about IP at all.
    Ukraine seems to be the most fucked up of the former Soviets.
    Russia isn't far behind, with allofmp3 and all.
    All the remaining ex-Soviet states are notorious too.
    East europe in general has a long track record of piracy.
    West europe got the fastest lines and places like The Pirate Bay.
    South America is quite rampant too, last I checked.
    Australia banned the region coding crap, didn't they?

    Anyone know if the Middle East and Africa qualifies? Haven't heard much but I bet they do. Now they want to add Canada to this "exclusive" list? I have a much simpler proposition: Take the list of countries. Remove US and maybe their pet dog, UK. The remainder is their list of copyright villains.
  • by Lordpidey (942444) on Wednesday February 14, 2007 @08:17PM (#18018470) Homepage
    By allowing pirates within their shores, Canada is surely helping alleviate global warming. I thank them.
  • I think (Score:5, Insightful)

    by AlphaLop (930759) on Wednesday February 14, 2007 @08:20PM (#18018500)
    As an American Citizen I really hope Canada Man's up and tells the USA to go screw itself. America needs to worry more about the problems we have at home and less on other countries internal politics when they are not a threat to the U.S.'s safety.

    To the best of my knowledge, copyright infringement going on in other countries in no way affects our safety (besides the weak "it funds terrorists" argument that seems to be the defacto excuse for everything around here anymore).

    The only people that would benefit from the massive expense and sacrifice of civil liberty that would be necessary to enact such a stupid idea would be the media fat cats..... And they can go and (insert witty thing here) themselves for all I care.

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by blahplusplus (757119)
      "As an American Citizen I really hope Canada Man's up and tells the USA to go screw itself. America needs to worry more about the problems we have at home and less on other countries internal politics when they are not a threat to the U.S.'s safety."

      Any country that doesn't play by the economic policy of the US is a threat to the USA. The US is basically the arm of corporations now, your fellow countrymen's blind adherence to extreme propertarianism and extreme capitalism are partly to blame.

      I've been real
  • Michael Geist (Score:5, Interesting)

    by alexandre (53) * on Wednesday February 14, 2007 @08:26PM (#18018556) Homepage Journal
    Take a look at Michael Geist [michaelgeist.ca]'s blog... he's the Lawrence Lessig of Canada.

    This message proudly paid by a Montreal Pirate! (whatever that means ;)
  • Oh Put A Sock In It (Score:5, Informative)

    by The Real Nem (793299) on Wednesday February 14, 2007 @08:34PM (#18018628) Homepage

    The last article was completely overblown, and this is even worse.

    Once put on notice, failure to address U.S. concerns could result in trade challenges at the World Trade Organization, plus possible sanctions.

    Need I even go into the many ways the US has violated [www.cbc.ca] our free trade agreement. How are different copyright laws even a violation?

    ...and tiny microchips that allow video-game users to bypass copyright protections...

    Maybe because the copyright protections violate our basic copyright freedoms? There's no DMCA here.

    The industry paints a grim picture of Canada as a country where copyright pirates operate with impunity because of lax laws, poor enforcement and a laissez-faire attitude.

    In case you haven't noticed, we're lax in all areas of law. How has incarceration [wikipedia.org] helped to reduce US crime rates [fbi.gov]? Why should copyright violation be a criminal offense? The last article was even so bold to say:

    Frith says government bureaucrats try to placate him by saying that under the Copyright Act exhibitors have the ability to charge someone criminally. "But here's the catch. Under the Copyright Act, you have to prove that an individual camcording in the theatre is doing it for distribution purposes. That's almost impossible."

    So camcording is a criminal offense, you just have to, shock, prove your case rather than assume guilt. I guess this article is *technically* right when it says:

    Unlike in the United States and most other developed countries, videotaping movies in theatres is not illegal in Canada.

    What else did they complain about proving?

    We don't want to have to prove the economic loss from distribution. We want it to be a Criminal Code activity to be caught camcording. Period.

    Is that 15th century thinking I hear? Are they going to blacklist every liberal country?

    "Highly organized international-crime groups have rushed into the gap left by Canada's outmoded copyright law and now use the country as a springboard from which to undermine legitimate markets in the United States, the United Kingdom, Australia and elsewhere," the group said.

    Please, the UK and Australia wouldn't even have these type of laws if the US and *AA and friends hadn't strong armed them into it. Are these the only shinning examples they can find?

  • by Cordath (581672) on Wednesday February 14, 2007 @08:37PM (#18018668)
    Blacklisting Canada... What an excellent idea!

    Let's say that the U.S. delayed the release of all films in Canada by several months, as they have already threatened to do. Suddenly, film release dates in Canada would no longer coincide with the hype in American media. Canadian consumers would have to endure months of temptation to download industry-insider-provided rips of screeners (not crappy camcorder copies) before films finally come out in Canada. That would certainly hurt good films, but those one-weekend-wonder stinkers that are massively promoted (and never shown to critics in advance) would flop bigtime in a fore-warned Canada. Overall, that's a lot fewer movie tickets sold. Who's going to pick up the slack? Maybe, just maybe, local Canadian film-makers. Quebec actually has a pretty good cinema going but English Canada has bugger all thanks to the abundance of american media. Anything that reduces the market share of american cinema is likely to cause a boom in Canadian film. Yes, american TV shows filming on the cheap in Canada might finally have a little competition for local talent, but who cares?

    Market controls on foreign content in a nation's cinema have been shown to improve that nation's cinema. Just look at French cinema since WWII. Their government required that a certain percentage of films shown in French cinemas had to be French. U.S. production companies were financing cheap films just to boost the overall French market so they could release more films in France! Canada considered implementing similar legislation, but failed to do so, much to the detriment of our own nation's cinema. Canada's cinema could certainly benefit from market controls today, but implementing them would be political suicide for any who dared. The U.S. would cry foul over protectionism and Canadians used to american films would be very peeved about not being able to get their fix. However, if the kind americans were to do this for us...

    This really is a win-win situation for Canada. The worst the U.S. can do to Canada is the best possible thing for Canada's cinema and the worst possible thing for american film makers. So *PLEASE* blacklist us. Pretty please! I freakin' double dare ya! Heck, BAN the release of american movies in Canada indefinately!
  • by wrook (134116) on Wednesday February 14, 2007 @08:47PM (#18018746) Homepage
    I'd like to see what the reaction would be. It might surprise many Americans, but there is a fair amount of anti-american sentiment here north of the 49. I know we seem friendly and all, but really we're just polite. (Note: I like American's just fine... well all the ones that aren't the president... and a few others...)

    I believe all this "Canadians are dirty rotten thieves" stuff the "IP proponents" are pulling is due to the fact that the current government is working on revising our copyright law. I suspect that they are trying to pressure the Canadian government into getting their way.

    It might even be at the behest of the government who seems to be intent on listening to only one side (guess who?). The Conservatives campaigned partially on "repairing the damage that the liberals did to US - Canada relations" (not that most Americans pay much attention to Canada anyway...) The copyright reforms are likely to be very unpopular no matter what's in them. If they say, "Oh we need to crack down to keep our relations happy with the Americans", maybe they think that will smooth things over.

    If that's the case, I think they are terribly misguided. Canadians have always had a low tolerance to being stepped on by the elephant that is the US. We have a chip on our shoulders. In fact, one of the defining principles of being a Canadian is that "We aren't American". For some people, that's their only definition of being Canadian.

    Pressure from the US to do *anything* to our laws will likely doom that idea, whether it be good or bad. Hence it would be nice to see what happens if the above characterization would be on the front page of the local newspapers...
  • by G1975a (913602) on Wednesday February 14, 2007 @09:07PM (#18018922)
    How's aboot we withold Canadian bacon, maple syrup and cheap pharmacy drugs from Americans?
  • Canadians are nice (Score:4, Informative)

    by kurt555gs (309278) <kurt555gs@@@ovi...com> on Wednesday February 14, 2007 @10:49PM (#18019684) Homepage
    I travel to Canada quite a bit, and one thing I find there is a general respect for the law. But, respect works both ways and fair use is fair use.

    Just because the US was pressured into these silly ideas of Intellectual Property Owners can rule your mind, doest make them right.

    I think what the Riaa and Mpaa are worried about is that Canadians are still customers to be sold, not consumers to be culled.

    There are very few places on earth that are as fair and law abiding as Canada, but when we ask them to enact silly DMCA like laws, they might just not agree they want them.

    Remember, there is no such thing as Intellectual Property ownership, just a limited monopoly on the rights of distribution, excepting fair use.

    The whole world could learn from Canada on this.

    Cheers
     
  • by cpghost (719344) on Thursday February 15, 2007 @12:35AM (#18020270) Homepage

    - "Let's send the Omega Force!"

    - "There's a time to think, and there's a time to act. And this, gentlemen, is not a time to think."

    - "Canadians are always dreaming up a lotta ways to ruin our lives. The metric system, for the love of God! Celsius! Neil Young!" ... and now Piracy!

    and last, but not least:

    - "Stop piracy, pronto! Or we'll level Toronto!"

1 1 was a race-horse, 2 2 was 1 2. When 1 1 1 1 race, 2 2 1 1 2.

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