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A Tour of Googleplex East 109

Posted by CowboyNeal
from the and-on-your-left dept.
An anonymous reader writes "In Googleplex East: Search And The City, IWeek has posted a visual tour of the search giant's NYC HQ, complete with the requisite massage room, candy machine, and funky cafeteria. (There are even — surprise — work areas.) A companion story argues that New York City has reemerged as a tech center, citing the access to the Big Apple's media as a powerful pull for Web 2.0 companies. It also argues that NY's business community is more important these days to startups than Silicon Valley's deep pool of talent. Do you buy this thesis? Isn't it really unimportant these days where you work, geographically?"
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A Tour of Googleplex East

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  • Big Wow (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Subbynet (905560) on Saturday February 17, 2007 @09:00AM (#18050664) Homepage
    Ok ok, I've had enough... Who cares if Google provides candy machines? This is not news, and many companies have these facilities (and more) available to staff.
    • Yeah (Score:5, Funny)

      by Anonymous Coward on Saturday February 17, 2007 @09:18AM (#18050796)
      Amen.

      Seriously, what good is a tour of Google's facilities without Oompa-Loompas?

    • Re:Big Wow (Score:5, Interesting)

      by C_Kode (102755) on Saturday February 17, 2007 @10:55AM (#18051576) Journal
      Not my company. Every year I get striped of more and more benefits. My insurance premium goes up and it's coverage goes down. Raises seem to get smaller and bonuses are smaller if they happen at all. Google goes far beyond what normal companies do. While they don't provide the best of everything, they do a lot of stuff 95% of companies don't. I think you're just pissed off because you probably applied at Google and got rejected. :P
      • by dindi (78034)
        hahah ... we must be working at the same company :)
      • by BigBir3d (454486)

        Not my company. Every year I get striped of more and more benefits. My insurance premium goes up and it's coverage goes down. Raises seem to get smaller and bonuses are smaller if they happen at all.

        Try having a "real" job (ie not tech related)! I work as a car mechanic... we get no respect unless a friends car is acting up, hazardous working environment (chemicals), 1 week vacation (if I stay 15yrs I get 2 weeks!!!), no retirement (401k etc), weak health related benefits (flex), zero paid sick days, 4 pai

      • by drsquare (530038)
        I don't care if they give the employee of the month a blowjob, how is this news? This is the second article in the last two days that isn't news at all, it's just Google pandering. Tomorrow we'll be seeing:
        "Google Take Out the Rubbish for Bin Day"
        "Google Replace Urinal Cakes"
        "Google Reception Has New Carpet Fitted"

        Is Google paying Slashdot for all this publicity?
    • If the rest of the facility looks like Rober Propst's [wikipedia.org] worst nightmare. I don't care how much goddamned sushi and free candy you stuff down my gullet if I have to work in a gunmetal-grey, quarter-wall cube farm with unfinished ceilings and flourescent lighting. Oh, but I get a communal razor scooter to get to the bathroom!

      Yeah, uhm, thanks but no. It must look great to a 20-something who has never worked anywhere else and for whom free Red Bull sounds like a genuine perq, but that "don't be evil" bear is pre
    • by Keiseth (1064792)
      Amazing how well it works as an advertising device though. You bring in a machine and put some cheap candy in it and people are flocking all over to sign up with you, proclaiming you God. Don't get me wrong! I like Google. But it's amazing how easy it is to draw such attention. "Whoa," you'd think, "They give out free candy. BEST JOB EVER." Too good to be true, I'm positive. Check the fine print and search for some clause that requires you to sell your soul.
    • by enomar (601942)
      Free food is just icing on the cake at Google. If they took the food away, it would still be the number 1 place to work.

      They could lower salaries and take away all of the fringe benefits and it would still be a great place to work. The people and the culture are simply awesome.

      On top of that, the environment is carefully crafted so that you're at your most productive. I checked production code in on my first day! If you like the feeling of accomplishment that comes with getting things done, Google is th
  • Glad to know that there's some diversity in editors in their offices [informationweek.com]. Wonder if there's an ed(1) advocate on that whiteboard by now.
  • by physicsboy500 (645835) on Saturday February 17, 2007 @09:02AM (#18050684)
    Can't they just search for what they want to see?
  • unimpressed (Score:5, Insightful)

    by avdp (22065) * on Saturday February 17, 2007 @09:03AM (#18050686)
    I was rather unimpressed with the pictures I saw. OK, so free snacks (debatable if that's good or bad) but personally I find that work environment rather poor. Some big warehouse with waist high cubicle walls. Oh boy, sounds great until you've actually worked in one such cubicle farm. No thank you. I'll buy my own snacks.
    • by Critical Facilities (850111) on Saturday February 17, 2007 @09:08AM (#18050722) Homepage
      AVDP? This is your boss. This is the last time I'm going to tell you to stay out of my office and off my computer to look at that geeky site. You've got work [mcdonalds.com]to do, we're getting low on McMuffins. And for the last time, I don't care how good it is at google [google.com].
    • by 4D6963 (933028)

      Ditto, that was pretty disappointing, it all looked pretty poor and unoriginal, where are Mountain View's paper-free toilets?

    • by ari wins (1016630)
      Are you kidding? This place would be ideal for me.

      I'm just not so sure they'd approve my 40% personal work thesis "The Google altered-effects". Basically, 10% of my time would be spent smokin' blunts in the gaming area. Another 10% at the masseuse, broken up by a sporadic 15% allotment of time for the snack bars and mini-kitchens. That leaves me a whole 5% to Google strange terms like "hyperbolic colonoscopy" and "nude ascii games" to see what the results would be. Purely for strict marketing purposes o
  • I work from home=I make my own PB&J's
    I work at an office=Someone else makes my PB&J's

    FTW!
  • Isn't it really unimportant these days where you work, geographically?
    Please tell me where you live, where traffic, weather, and cost of living are non-issues.
  • by svunt (916464) on Saturday February 17, 2007 @09:16AM (#18050782) Homepage Journal
    Meh - I'm only an accountant in a relatively small business, but I've got a more spacious work area than any of the cube farmers at Google. We don't have a games room, but when the clock strikes Beer O'Clock on a Friday, the recycle bins become wickets, there's already a crease made from duct tape in the main office, and even the MD joins the weekly cricket match, brewski in hand.

    It's great that they're trying, but once you're in the several thousand employee range, you've lost any genuinely communal feeling amongst the staff, and personally I find the attempts to be relaxed and groovy a bit forced in those corporate environments.

  • by Anonymous Coward
    Do Googles employees really want to be treated like 5 year olds in some big, colorful playpen?

    I find it patronizing and vaguely insulting.

    These people are supposed to be adults, aren't they?
    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by Teresita (982888)
      Last year there was a big dustup at Microsoft when management briefly stopped providing clean towels in the locker room to save costs. When Google meets Mr. Entropy, as all organizations eventually do, the cute little benefits will either go away or be rationed to the Beautiful People, ie. middle management and above.
      • by 1lus10n (586635)
        That would make sense ... if google and its employees didnt already own most of google. (why do you think they wont split the stock.)
    • by alienmole (15522)

      These people are supposed to be adults, aren't they?

      Not really. They hire 'em young, and indoctrinate them into the cult. That's not just Google, same goes for Microsoft and even, back in the day, IBM (with employees singing company songs first thing in the morning). Remember, these people are nerds who live largely inside their heads really don't want to have to pay attention to the real world, so a company that coddles them and lets them focus on coding plus some "fun" can seem like an ideal setup.

  • re: "...argues that NY's business community is more important these days to startups than Silicon Valley's deep pool of talent. Do you buy this thesis? Isn't it really unimportant these days where you work, geographically?"

    I think we already covered this yesterday.....

    http://slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=07/02/16/165925 0 [slashdot.org]
    • by doom (14564)

      DreadfulGrape wrote:

      re: "...argues that NY's business community is more important these days to startups than Silicon Valley's deep pool of talent. Do you buy this thesis? "

      What I think is that the east coast businesses have been living in terror at the thought that the center of the economy might move out from under them and head west, so this is something of a "whistling in the dark"/"tell them what they want to hear" story.

      • Yeah - whistling past the graveyard - my very thought
      • by b0s0z0ku (752509)
        What I think is that the east coast businesses have been living in terror at the thought that the center of the economy might move out from under them and head west, so this is something of a "whistling in the dark"/"tell them what they want to hear" story.

        Except that I know more people in tech who are having difficulty finding well paying jobs in the Bay Area than in the East. It seems that *everyone* wants to be out in the Bay Area, so the job market is much more cutthroat and competitive. Besides, if

        • by doom (14564)

          Basically, both places are awesome in different ways.

          Not a point that I disagree with, really, but it doesn't change the fact that I think the East fears the West...

          If I'm sounding annoyed about it, it's because the East is still in control of a large chunk of the newsmedia (and isn't doing all that great a job, either, cf. Judith Miller formerly of the New York Times), and whenever possible they run snarky stories about how Google doesn't really know what they're doing, isn't managing to stay "not evi

          • by pyite (140350)
            Not a point that I disagree with, really, but it doesn't change the fact that I think the East fears the West...

            I don't think so. The east has Wall St. Unless you've worked there, you (not you, you, but people in general) will probably underestimate the tech talent that resides on Wall St.*

            * - I use the term Wall St. loosely, since nowadays it refers to most of lower Manhattan as well as the Jersey City water front.

          • The east still owns the big chunk of the news media because there has yet to be a newspaper worth reading produced west of Washington DC. I agree that the NYT et al leave a lot to be desired at times, but come on: LA times? Good once a week, if you're lucky. SF chronicle? Worthless rag. I'd almost prefer to read USA Today. I'd buy the NYT or WSJ at $10 before I would buy a west coast paper for $1.
            • I'm glad to see you New York boosters coming out of the woodwork, but I'm not the one who's interested in an East vs. West fight... my contention is that the East coast media is -- in particular I've seen many whiney complaints about google in places like the Wall Street Journal (how dare these young whipper snappers tell us that we've been doing our IPOs wrong? And what about that "don't be evil" nonsense, are they accusing us of being evil?).

              It is certainly true that despite the many flaws of the New Y

    • t also argues that NY's business community is more important these days to startups than Silicon Valley's deep pool of talent. Do you buy this thesis?

      I get four to six people contacting me every day for work in New York City. Unfortunately, all of the emails are broken English. Not exactly the best way to entice someone to work for your company.

      If communication is a problem in most companies, I can only imagine what it would be like when my co-workers don't even speak English. It brings back nightmares of m

      • by b0s0z0ku (752509)
        I get four to six people contacting me every day for work in New York City. Unfortunately, all of the emails are broken English. Not exactly the best way to entice someone to work for your company.

        NYC and NJ have a high proportion of immigrants. That's what makes the place fun; it can also make it infuriating at times. But they're mostly hardworking people busting their b@lls to get somewhere, often interesting and a joy to work with.

        -b.

  • by CaroKann (795685) on Saturday February 17, 2007 @09:54AM (#18051042)
    Judging from he workspace pictures, it appears Google subscribes to the idea that cubicles without high walls promote communication and interworking among employees. Of course, this is at the expense of privacy, peace and quiet, and for some people, stress relief.
    After working in both settings, I have to say that I prefer low walled cubicles. High walled cubicles create a claustrophobic, catacomb-like environment. Low walled cubicles create a friendlier work floor, and it is easier to have impromptu meetings in the cubicle hallways when people can spread out and still see each other.
    • by wkitchen (581276) on Saturday February 17, 2007 @10:39AM (#18051420)
      I guess I'm old fashioned. Or maybe just a bit antisocial. But my preferred work space is a real office with a door that, though usually open, can be closed when I need some "focus time", or locked when I'm away and don't want my stuff messed with. A work space that's well enough isolated that I can listen to music without headphones and not bother anyone. Unfortunately, it's been a long time since I've had that luxury.
    • by Peyna (14792)
      Low cubicle walls also make it harder to do things you're not supposed to do at work.
      • by 1lus10n (586635)
        If you believe that you have obviously never worked in a large environment. Places that have droves of people in a wide open area will have one slacker bring down half the department to show them a flash cartoon/youtube video.
    • Low walled cubicles create a friendlier work floor, and it is easier to have impromptu meetings in the cubicle hallways

      That's great if your work productivity improves by having frequent impromptu meetings. It very well might for some jobs, but for many others in IT it's a real productivity wreck.
    • by LauraW (662560)

      Judging from he workspace pictures, it appears Google subscribes to the idea that cubicles without high walls promote communication and interworking among employees.

      Yes. That's probably my #1 annoyance about working here. Almost nobody has a private office; it's all shared offices and big, shared cubicles, often with low walls. I think some of it is just because we're growing so quickly we're often out of space, but there's also the idea that it promotes collaboration. And of course the founders were grad students, who often work in crowded environments.

      If you have a popular office- or cube-mate, it can be very distracting. I had private offices or cubes at my

  • It may not matter where you work once you get the job, but if you want to find a tech job, there's just so much opportunity in the NYC area. I guess living here isn't for everyone, but I haven't looked back since I moved out 8 years ago.
    • by b0s0z0ku (752509)
      It may not matter where you work once you get the job, but if you want to find a tech job, there's just so much opportunity in the NYC area

      There's also a lot of biotech and pharma out in NJ - North Jersey and the New Brunswick area especially. And Rutgers in NJ has a good (and inexpensive for residents) engineering and science program. If you want to live in the "city" in NJ, you can still live in Hoboken which is 5 min. by subway away from NYC (though the scene in parts of town at night is a bit too "f

    • NYC is a haven for programmers who don't mind (or enjoy, I guess) working in the financial industry. Many massive investment firms, and the thousands of software companies that support them, operate largely out of NYC. My situation's the exact reverse of yours... I haven't stopped looking forward to getting out of here since I arrived... but damn, the opportunities here make it so tough to leave.
      • well said. Finding a nice well-paying job in NYC has never been a problem for me. But (my) problem is that 90% of them is in financial sector. For a lot of people I know, its very appealing. But not for me. I have wall street firms. For them, technology dept is nothing but a big expenditure, and they treat techies like it. If you are not in business side of work, you are nobody in these financial firms. And some of these business users can be really nasty and snobbish towards tech - technology is just suppo
        • Typo correction - Second line should read "I hate wall street firms."
        • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

          by b0s0z0ku (752509)
          But (my) problem is that 90% of them is in financial sector.

          Only if you look at the big "known" firms. There are plenty of architecture/engineering companies, construction, design, and biomedical stuff in NYC and NJ. Also, don't discount NJ. You can even live in NYC and reverse commute if you really feel the need to.

          -b.

          • by 1lus10n (586635)
            And you would have a hell of a time affording it. (reverse commuting) Most tech people want to work with other tech people, otherwise they tend to be treated as a step above a secretary.
            • by b0s0z0ku (752509)
              Most tech people want to work with other tech people, otherwise they tend to be treated as a step above a secretary.

              My point was that there are different types of "tech." Not all of it involves doing online solutions, designing hardware, managing servers, or setting up networks. Building control systems? I call that tech. Biostatistics modelling? Yep, tech too. Data analysis for drug trials? Tech. Design of environmentally sound new construction? Tech. It you broaden your horizons beyond just ru

  • by chia_monkey (593501) on Saturday February 17, 2007 @09:59AM (#18051102) Journal
    It really does matter. On paper, two very geographically diverse places could be equivalent (infrastructure, cost of living, commute, etc) however, having a certain talent pool and mindset is a HUUUUUUGE advantage. I've lived all around the country in various "hotspots" and I can say without a doubt that by simply living in the Bay Area, I felt so much more creative and productive. You are always surrounded by driven people, creative people, people with ideas, people that aren't afraid to just go for is (ie, not work that 9-5 job). I miss that feeling and I shall be heading back there as soon as I possibly can.
    • While NYC's media may be increasing the depth of the talent pool here, no one should expect that the culture - specifically in the media space - is adjusting at the same pace. IMHO the media here are slow to adapt, flying by the seat of their pants in terms of making the transition, marginally in denial about the whole thing and largely technologically illiterate. Agencies can't decide whether they want to hire a designer or a developer; something I experience first hand often when I am approached about a d
      • by b0s0z0ku (752509)
        IMHO the media here are slow to adapt, flying by the seat of their pants in terms of making the transition, marginally in denial about the whole thing and largely technologically illiterate.

        To some extent, technological illiteracy is a *good* thing for the market for techies. After all, it makes consultants necessary to provide constructive advice and to educate businesspeople on matters of technology. If everyone was equally technologically literate, tech knowledge wouldn't be a valuable commodity that

        • Understood. However I'd rather make a little less money than deal with people who seem incapable o making decisions, even when provided with ample information with which to do so. Not arguing though, I agree with you. Just stating a personal pet-peeve.
          • by b0s0z0ku (752509)
            However I'd rather make a little less money than deal with people who seem incapable o making decisions, even when provided with ample information with which to do so.

            There's also the 'perfectionist' type that will want to switch systems and technologies every 6 months just to try the 'latest and greatest.' They're not incapable of making decisions, they just enjoy trying new things all the time. Again, ultimately, more $$$ in the pockets of the engineers and techies.

            -b.

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by arudloff (564805) *

      You can surround yourself with creative go getters anywhere in the country -- at half the cost, I might add. Just follow the birds of a feather mantra.

      For us, it's been Orlando. Similar climate (72 degrees avg. temp) and a huge talent pool. UCF is the 6th largest student population and has a big focus on engineering/it/digital media. There is tons of money for investing, and a seriously cheap cost of living. The disney influence only adds to the creative pool and offers a ton of designers looking for contra

      • There certainly is the cost of living to deal with out on the west coast. That's why I'm doing a quick recovery stint in Atlanta.

        I agree but disagree with your "birds of a feather" statement. I've always taken pride in the fact I've been able to surround myself with entrepreneurial and creative people, no matter where I am. However, some places it happens just by walking down the street and getting coffee (ie, 85% of the population is like-minded) or other times you have to make an active search for suc
        • by 1lus10n (586635)
          Orlando has one of the most bland culture scenes I have ever witnessed. Part of the draw that the bay area has is the diversity and overall "scene" not just the techies.
    • You are always surrounded by driven people, creative people, people with ideas, people that aren't afraid to just go for is (ie, not work that 9-5 job).

      ....or you COULD live elsewhere and find a boss that knows how to hire inspired staff. At our shop, the boss kinda tends to spoil us... Days off when we want, rides to work, snacks at work, lunches at his cost... The best part is he'll let us "get our geek on"; we're allowed free rein as long as the work is done, results are produced, and he's kept in the loop as far as any changes made. Result? He's got a bunch of geeks that love their jobs, work hard, feel inspired, and stay 'til long after most woul

      • by b0s0z0ku (752509)
        ...or you COULD live elsewhere and find a boss that knows how to hire inspired staff.

        Work isn't your whole life, only around 1/3 of it. You want to be able to meet inspired, interesting people outside of work, too.

        -b.

        • You want to be able to meet inspired, interesting people outside of work, too.

          Funny, I've never had a problem there, either. I just go to where the creative tend to collect. You'll find 'em in bookstores, indy music stores and bars, all around. We're also a short hop from Austin - "The Live Music Capitol of the World" - and there's NO shortage of inspiration on the scene there, either. South by Southwest gets bigger every year, and has even spawned local offshoots.

          As a military brat, I noticed this never seemed to be a problem wherever we went. You can find creativity every

    • by danpritts (54685)
      that's the truth.

      I live in Ann Arbor, MI.

      Ann Arbor is a great town, and has a reasonably good tech talent pool, and a major research university with a strong engineering school, CS department, and "school of information". We're essentially part of the metro detroit area, and as such, the entire economy here is going down the tubes courtesy of the auto industry (and unfortunately, the Pfizer research lab here is closing too). The place just isn't vibrant like i've experienced when I visit the coasts.

      Even b
  • From the point of view of the pop-culture imagination, is it as though Googleplex(es) are to our time and set what the Fillmores and Playboy Mansions were to those of the 1960s and 1970s?
  • Isn't it really unimportant these days where you work, geographically?

    Um, no. A lot of business is still done face-to-face, and people tend not to trust people they don't have physical (no, not in a dirty-minded sense :) contact with. Who'd you trust - someone whom you've spoken to in person, or some face on a teleconference screen? Also, where you work is where you live - within a 50 mi or so radius anyway. NYC offers art, theatre, lots of young people of the correct gender, open stuff late at night,

  • paul graham's take (Score:3, Informative)

    by Blitter (15795) on Saturday February 17, 2007 @10:54AM (#18051564)
    Paul Graham makes this interesting case:

    http://paulgraham.com/siliconvalley.html [paulgraham.com]

    • Except for his panning of NYC as a place that nerds dislike and lumping it into the same bowl as Vegas. NYC is one of the oldest, most beautiful cities in the US, with a pretty diverse array of industry and technologies. It's not only the financial and content industries - there's biomedical, engineering, architecture, manufacturing in NJ, etc. As far as hiking and hanging out outside, not all of NYC is midtown Manhattan or the "financial district." And the mountains are only an hour or two away.

      Vegas

  • Depressing (Score:3, Insightful)

    by dreemernj (859414) on Saturday February 17, 2007 @11:04AM (#18051668) Homepage Journal
    All the images are oddly depressing. I don't mind a work environment that's all business, so to speak, and I have seen small offices where creativity is the goal and some of them were really beautiful and relaxing and allowed you to sit and work for ridiculously long periods of time and still feel comfortable. But the pics of the Googleplex are actually depressing to me. It's a standard looking office space with a bunch of novelties thrown in to remind you of what it's like to not be at work.

    That said, Google if you are hiring, I'd love to work at your facilities :-D
  • Let's see... (Score:3, Insightful)

    by MarcoAtWork (28889) on Saturday February 17, 2007 @11:06AM (#18051688)
    - big space set up as a cube farm so everybody hears everything and it's nearly impossible to concentrate?
    - cubes are set up in a way so that PHBs can walk around and see what everybody is doing without any sort of privacy?
    - only office pictured is a 4-person office with desks facing the corners so again there's no privacy whatsoever?
    - nobody playing games in the gaming area but just one person taking some sort of nap?
    - snacks around the office so workers don't ever need to leave and can get right back down to work?

    this is making the news just because it's google, the working arrangements are the same as a million other valley startups: as much as MS-bashing is de-rigueur here on /. I do think they treat their workers a lot better: having a real office with a door that closes and a window beats every massage/gamesroom/freesnacks/... cubicle farm: I know, I've worked in both and my productivity level is hugely better when I can concentrate without being distracted by coworker xyz on the phone, or other coworkers having an impromptu meeting on things I couldn't care less (hint: that's what 4-person meeting rooms are for).
    • I wish I had a cubicle! We have an office, and there are 5 of us, soon to be 6 at desks all facing the walls.
  • by Anonymous Coward
    The real question is, do their masseuses offer a happy ending?
  • -Low cube walls... hopefully nobody talks on their phone.
    -Snack room... ok so the 'Whole Foods' styled snack dispensers are cool, however, not sure of the value over your standard vending machine.
    -Game room? How about a gym? Do they have workout facilities or is the game room supposed to be similar to the "DDR in Schools" phenom we're starting to see? http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/c h ronicle/archive/2006/01/25/BUGA6GSFCG1.DTL [sfgate.com]

    Google reminds me of MSFT, they have a cash cow (search, Window
  • Is Google NY as tough as NY? How many fights break out in the cube farm? Do they have anger relief facilities? You'd think they would have more privacy. Or perhaps the NYorkers are chained to their desks, literally.

    Was amused by a portrait of the directors being provided but no portraits of developers. These are the guys who can live in houses, own apartments in Manhattan, and own 25 acres in upstate NY. All the subordinates, not pictured, could work all they wanted and never ever have the means to ow
  • While it's true that there are talent centers in places like New York or the Silicon Valley, there are myriad smaller, but no less talented, tech pols across the nation.

    For example, some of the best developers and designers I've ever worked with are based in Columbus, Ohio. You've got lots of graduates coming from the Columbus College of Art and Design, as well as The Ohio State University. It's a tough-to-beat combo of talent and craftsmanship, in large part due to that good ol' Mid-Western work ethic. :
    • Out of curiosity, where are you now?

      I graduated from Ohio University, about an hour south of Columbus. We've got a good program as well, but OSU gets most of the credit.
      • by macserv (701681)
        I'm in northern Virginia right now, but coming back to Columbus in a month. You're right, though, OU definitely has great HCI and design programs.
  • I find it interesting that Google, spawned in California (one of the most anti-gun-owner places in the USA), is expanding in another of them: New York City, home of the Sullivan Act.

    On the "Red State / Blue State" scale, they're both deepest blue - which means they're doing the same on a lot of other issues.

    About half the population, and about half the technical talent and genius-level personnel, are members of "Blue State" cultures, and unwilling to move to places where their rights would be as thoroughly
    • by 1lus10n (586635)
      You sir, are a fucking idiot who spends too much time watching fox news. Both New York and California have Republican governors. Both of them are predominately "true" republican states. None of this hogwash jesus freak crap that dominates the south and midwest. The biggest tech centers in red states are RTP NC and Austin TX. Both of which are dwarfed by NYC and silicon valley. I would also point out that those areas are driven by companies that are based in NYC and/or the West coast.

      I own guns. I like g
  • Apparently Google employees eat crap.

    All Microsoft needs to do is wait a couple years
    and Google will just die of a heart attack...

    I guess you don't need to be smart to be an engineer.

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