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Google To Monetize Content From Consenting YouTubers 55

Posted by Zonk
from the youtubers-is-the-strangest-word-ever dept.
sufijazz writes "Google has announced its intention to allow advertisers to monetize the contents of YouTube videos. 'The ads accompanying the outbound YouTube clips won't be in a video format. Instead, they will appear as a graphic straddling the video or as a link along the bottom. Google won't be pulling clips from YouTube's entire library ... The material sent to other Web sites will be confined to video from providers who sign consent forms. With the new twist, Web sites participating in AdSense now can sign up to specify the kinds of YouTube videos they want shown on their pages.' Everyone sees a cut in this plan, evidently. Both the creator of the video as well as anyone that embeds it on their website will receive a share of the profits. The company has yet to specify the percent each party gets."
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Google To Monetize Content From Consenting YouTubers

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  • by DamonHD (794830) <d@hd.org> on Tuesday October 09, 2007 @09:18AM (#20910359) Homepage
    Interesting that the AdSense medium (along with its counterpart, AdWords) now supports diverse charging models CPM/CPC/CPA as well as all these different media. I'm a bit of a YouTube skeptic, but maybe G will make it a little more grown-up and useful with things like this!

    Glossary: http://www.publisher-world.com/read.php?12,10879,10879#msg-10879 [publisher-world.com]

    Rgds

    Damon
    • by ozbird (127571)
      ... and maybe advertisers will grow up and realise that pissing off your potential customer base is bad for business. No, I didn't think so either.
  • Monetize? (Score:5, Insightful)

    by MyLongNickName (822545) on Tuesday October 09, 2007 @09:19AM (#20910373) Journal
    Submitter using his thesaurus without really understanding the word? 'Commercialize' perhaps, but not 'monetize'
  • by EveryNickIsTaken (1054794) on Tuesday October 09, 2007 @09:29AM (#20910455)
    Emebedded videos from YouTube will now be accompanied by ads, as long as the original video creator/poster agrees to having said ads? The summary sounds like it was written by Mike Tyson.
    • by Fizzl (209397)
      Ah, thanks for clarifying this.
      I stumbled to my shoelaces while trying to decipher the summary.
      I understood the "I could get paid for my videos if someone would be interested about them", but the "how?" part was bit of a mess.
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      It seems to go one step further: YouTube videos with these ads will be automatically placed on websites depending on keywords, etc. So not only does a website creator have automatic ads on their site, they have automatic YouTube videos on their sites as well.
  • Ads straddling the videos? Just what I needed... even more stimulation for my brain. How long will it be before the ads are videos themselves?
  • AdSense's future... (Score:5, Interesting)

    by dada21 (163177) <adam.dada@gmail.com> on Tuesday October 09, 2007 @09:34AM (#20910521) Homepage Journal
    I wrote about this a year ago in terms of YouTube being a great monetizing (that's AdSense-speak) product for all involved: Google, the publisher (website), and the advertiser. Flash-based videos are hard to "ad-block" plus people are more likely to actually notice an ad if it is discretely placed and doesn't interfere with the video. I think this is a great idea.

    I like AdSense, it provides a reasonable enough income (although nowhere near 30%) for the sites I edit and host, but I think it is time that Google moves into a more targeted direction.

    The amount of information that AdSense ads sends to Google is astonishing -- which is one reason most geeks probably block ads. I'm a fan of blocking ads if you don't have any desire in the advertisers, and I openly support it on my sites (some of them even provide a link to ad-blocking software). For me, interested parties who click ads make me more money than uninterested parties that accidentally click ads. Win, win, win.

    Yet since Google has such a vast supply of information on people who don't MIND ads, why not start putting up ads that might be of interest to the user? If "John" goes from a site about gambling to a site about sports, Google knows it -- why not start displaying ads for "John" that combine all of his possible interests? The YouTube ads can be the same -- they know where you've been, so why not combine those keywords into ads that MIGHT be more interesting to you?

    Sure, it's a privacy breach already, but that's what pays the bills for the sites you're visiting freely. Not many of us are going to pay for a subscription to a site (although I pay for many), so advertising has to be what it is -- it can just get better.

    I'd also like to see a user-configurable plug-in that lets a user "vote" on ads. I'm sick of seeing certain ads on certain sites, so we should have the ability to tell Google "Don't show me these anymore." The content publisher (website) may prefer those ads because they pay CPM (pays per visit, not per click), but if the visitor doesn't want to see them, isn't it in the advertiser's and the visitor's best interest to turn them off for that user?
    • Yep, if I have to see adverts I'd prefer to at least be able to choose a category of advert to see.. for example MSN comes up with random movie ads, some dodgy sex chat type ad, and some ad with a large hairy male nipple on it, I mean wtf.. I don't need to see that while chatting to my friends (but I like using custom emotes on MSN X( )
    • We are talking about flash based video players right? First block, don't install flash. Second block, do NOT allow the url that server the player to load. Third block, do not allow the video to be loaded.

      I am not familiar with browser based blocking, but the last two are trivial with proxy software. My current favorite is privoxy but you might find bfilter to your tastes as well. Hell, if you are really ambitious you can use squid to send all web traffic through several filters. The only effective way to p

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      I think this is a great idea.

      It allows for more choice for website owners and advertisers, but this sounds absolutely dreadful to me as a website viewer who actually displays ads (when displaying such ads doesn't compromise my security/privacy). Google was always hailed for ONLY producing non-obtrusive text ads. They've since moved to graphical ads and so they're one big advantage has been lost. Google is now no longer any different from any other advertising agency.

      I'll certainly be avoiding all websites that make use of these obtrus

    • by ianalis (833346)

      Yet since Google has such a vast supply of information on people who don't MIND ads, why not start putting up ads that might be of interest to the user? If "John" goes from a site about gambling to a site about sports, Google knows it -- why not start displaying ads for "John" that combine all of his possible interests? The YouTube ads can be the same -- they know where you've been, so why not combine those keywords into ads that MIGHT be more interesting to you?

      Hhmmm... let's see... what if I'm a goat lover and I also happen to like viewing pr0n, what ads should I see?

      • Hhmmm... let's see... what if I'm a goat lover and I also happen to like viewing pr0n, what ads should I see?

        You might find a lot of references to that sort of this on this site [slashdot.org]...
  • GOOGLE! (Score:2, Funny)

    by tlacuache (768218)
    OMG! Go0gle is teh ev1L!!!11!
  • I am concerned whether someone is allowed to see what ads do I get. Sure, if google will publish my search terms or any other private information, it will be illegal. But is it legal for google to tell e.g. government agencies about the ads I get? Not a tinfoil hat fan, just curios.
  • by Digitus1337 (671442) <lk_digitus@[ ]mail.com ['hot' in gap]> on Tuesday October 09, 2007 @10:01AM (#20910851) Homepage
    A certain percent is split with the video's creator(s). What percentage? Zero!
  • >Monetize Content From Consenting YouTubers

    That sounds like it ought to be illegal under local anti-pimping ordinances or some such.

  • In my experience, Google just makes up any old numbers for their AdSense sheets. It's little wonder they didn't release solid percentage values... they could give them in 2d4 style notation.
  • There are already ads on YouTube along with promo videos for certian companies (i.e. deodorant companies, whatever crap movie is coming out). This will just further "Google-ize" YouTube into an Adsense, commercialized machine it was going to turn out to be anyway.
  • I used to really enjoy youtube, but the day I see ads on the videos I can't block is the day I never go back there.
  • ...because I was just thinking the other day, if there's anything that'll improve Leave Britney Alone, it's Leave Britney Alone with an ad for vaginal hygiene products scrolling across the bottom.
  • It seems to me that ad supported content is now the way to go. Of course, I'm now waiting for myspace to ban youtube again the moment they start displaying ads in their embedded player, I don't think myspace ever unbanned revver or imeem - despite changes to their players and business models (imeem is too much of a threat to myspace's music fan market, revver is just a small fish and easy to intimidate)
  • Once we marvelled at 320x240 MPEG downloads. Then Lucasfilm revolutionized the web with its groundbreaking 640x360 trailers. Then Goo Tube shrunk it back down to 320x240. Now with crawlers, we're down to 320x200. Soon 160x120 will be the new breakthrough. At least the Goo videos will have something readable on top of all those shaky, blurry, camera angles.

  • YouTube has use the "safe harbor" provisions of the DMCA to protect them from liability under the DMCA. However, I believe that if you make money from copyrighted content you lose this protection. Since much of the content uses copyrighted material will this increase Google exposure to lawsuits? One supposes that they will argue it is all "fair use", but a lot of the use on YouTube is clearly outside a reasonable definition of fair use. Google, of course has a history of deciding to ignore copyright la

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