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pizza.com Sold For $2.6m

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  • You kidding? (Score:5, Insightful)

    by WarlockD (623872) on Saturday April 05, 2008 @08:38AM (#22972170)
    That was a STEAL. Just think of the marketing budget of any of the standard delivery places (Pizza Hut, Papa Johns, etc). This is not even a blip on that radar. I just hope it was a pizza place. God help us all if it was a porn company.
    • by CheeseburgerBrown (553703) on Saturday April 05, 2008 @08:41AM (#22972184) Homepage Journal
      If it isn't a pizza company, I say we abandon domain names and go back to numeric addressing.
      • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

        by Anonymous Coward
        Domain names? Who uses those nowdays? I just enter my QUERY into the address bar and voala! I get a page.

        Search is the big winner not domain names, thats such a money laundering scheme by ICANN and just for suckers.

        If something is GOOD then it travels by word of mouth, just like news.

        • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

          by Anonymous Coward
          Having "pizza" in your domain name will increase your rank on searches for "pizza".
        • by LoadWB (592248) on Saturday April 05, 2008 @10:32AM (#22972818) Journal
          Frankly I've never used a "search" I just fire up my Intarweb close out a couple of advertisements and today's news then a couple more advertisements then another then spend some time changing my passwords on my bank accounts because my bank says they had to lock my account (thank goodness they're looking out for me because I didn't even remember about my account with the National Bank of Zimbabwe and I know its really secure because they ask for so much of my personal information to prove its me) and I am also lucky enough to get most of the shopping I need done from the mail in my Inbox (I haven't had to go to the store for medicine or vitamins or butt paste in ages) then type something into the "keyword" box and I get what I need but if it doesn't show anything then I figure it doesn't exist or I really didn't need it anyway.

          LOLZ
        • by Macthorpe (960048)

          Search is the big winner not domain names, thats such a money laundering scheme by ICANN and just for suckers.
          If that is the case, isn't search therefore "just a money-laundering scheme" by Google et al?
        • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday April 05, 2008 @02:07PM (#22974044)
          What I have found funny is that I work at a tech company, for the sake of this post let's go with "foobar", and I was over at a sales persons desk when I asked him to go to our homepage. "Just go to foobar.com", I told him. He goes and types "foobar.com" in the search box at the top of the Firefox chrome. "Wait wait wait, what are you doing?", I asked, "Why don't you just type it in the address bar and go straight there?". "What are you talking about, I am typing it in the address bar!", he replies. I grab the keyboard and show him how to type a URL into Firefox. "Oh, I didn't know you could do that with foobar.com", he said.

          Apparently unless some people see something with http://www./ [www.] on the front, they have no idea they can stick it in the address bar. Google has become the gateway to the internet, even when you could get there directly..
        • by KevinKnSC (744603)

          Search is the big winner not domain names, thats such a money laundering scheme by ICANN and just for suckers.
          Do you even know what money laundering is?
    • by MikeFM (12491)
      At least they bought it fairly. I hate the bastards that stake out your working domains and if you're a day late re-registering them they grab the domains up and try to blackmail you into buying them back for ridiculous amounts of money. I've actually thought about physically assaulting one of these bastards that targeted a group of my sites registered through a register that decided to block my access to see when the domains expired, because I canceled an unrelated service with them, and didn't send any ki
      • by CastrTroy (595695)
        If your domain means anything to you, then you don't let it expire. Make sure you renew it at least a month before it runs out, just in case there are complications in the renewal process, like your registrar's site is down. If your domain lapses and somebody else buys it out, it's your own dumb fault. It's not like you're required to wait until the day before it expires to renew it.
    • by luder (923306) *

      God help us all if it was a porn company.
      Everyting is possible [bigsausagepizza.com] (NSFW).
    • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

      by jonadab (583620)
      > Just think of the marketing budget of any of the standard delivery
      > places (Pizza Hut, Papa Johns, etc). This is not even a blip on that radar.

      They still have to advertise the domain to get any real value out of it. But it's a fantastically easy domain to remember, so if a major pizza chain wants to introduce online ordering, the purchase might make sense. An extremely easy-to-remember domain like that means you don't have to expend nearly as much of your advertising space/time/effort/whatever get
  • by FoolsGold (1139759) on Saturday April 05, 2008 @08:40AM (#22972182)
    Buying a ton of domain names on the cheap in the mid 90's would have been a sound investment.
    • by MrNaz (730548) * on Saturday April 05, 2008 @09:00AM (#22972310) Homepage
      I'll definitely take that moral to heart for the next time the 90's come around.
    • I dunno... as former owner of the following, I'm not doing too well.

      peerat.com
      19x.net
      budgetdsl.com
      budgetdsl.net
      immunotherapist.com
      lo-cal.com
      artoo-detoo.com
      see-threepio.com
      martiansprings.com
      dslcheap.com
      instantonpc.com
      nobootpc.com
      elmwoodstrip.com
      eastaurora.com

      and many others that I've forgotten.

      What do you mean they're crap names?!?!?
      Actually, a couple of them have become successful sites in the hands of their current owners.

      I only managed to sell one, though, for $2500.
      Still came out a

  • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday April 05, 2008 @08:45AM (#22972214)
    I've PERSONALLY been so hungry I couldn't make it to google, typing "pizza" directly into the URL bar AT LEAST 50,000 times, spending $20+ dollars each time. If there's a couple of more people out there like me, they've already broken even.
    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by kesuki (321456)
      you jest, but seriously Even In a Recession People Need To Eat. why do you think most of the small independent millionaire/billionaires founded their own regional food chain. consider, for instance, Wendy's founder Dave Thomas. Do you know ANY Other Way for a HIGH SCHOOL DROP OUT to become a billionaire? do you really? really? I'd like to know, because I have one year of college, and I'd like to be e billionaire too...
      • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

        by Blkdeath (530393)

        you jest, but seriously Even In a Recession People Need To Eat. why do you think most of the small independent millionaire/billionaires founded their own regional food chain. consider, for instance, Wendy's founder Dave Thomas. Do you know ANY Other Way for a HIGH SCHOOL DROP OUT to become a billionaire? do you really? really? I'd like to know, because I have one year of college, and I'd like to be e billionaire too...

        Well, it takes a university dropout [wikipedia.org] to enter the software field so I suppose high school dropout and food were inevitable?

  • by WindBourne (631190) on Saturday April 05, 2008 @08:50AM (#22972238) Journal
    First, America is going through a recession because of our debt, combined with our realizing that we have overspent. OTH, Europe, japan, canada, etc are all picking up speed while the dollar continues to plummet due to our federal and trade deficits. Hopefully, the next president will be responsible.

    Second, the net remains one of the best places to lower your costs. Far cheaper than having a building and ppl. 2.6M? That is nothing.
    • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

      by Anonymous Coward
      Actually, we have not quite tipped into a recession yet...defined as two consecutive quarters of negative growth. But, with the recent jobs report its is looking more likely. But really only the mealy mouth politicians are saying we are in a recession right NOW.

      Second, the debt you mention is of course the sub-prime business. Which was encouraged by the Democrats whining about the loan industry not loaning enough to those with bad credit. Of course they were more than happy to make the loans, collect the up
    • by kesuki (321456)
      Japan is doing well because they are the primary instigators of all the cheap tech coming from most of Asia, the middle east is doing terrible because the rich don't give a damn about the poor there(if they did they became a terrorist), and the rest of the world doesn't care as long as wealthy elite of the middle east keep investing in Asia, Europe and America with their fat wallets. (and you wonder why the terrorists scream die infidel American scum)

      where was i Oh yes, Oh Canada, the number one oil exporte
    • by Jafafa Hots (580169) on Saturday April 05, 2008 @12:58PM (#22973660) Homepage Journal

      First, America is going through a recession because of our debt, combined with our realizing that we have overspent. OTH, Europe, japan, canada, etc are all picking up speed while the dollar continues to plummet due to our federal and trade deficits. Hopefully, the next president will be responsible.

      Don't worry, the Republicans are certain to make sure we hold the next president responsible.

  • by Joce640k (829181) on Saturday April 05, 2008 @08:55AM (#22972274) Homepage
    A major pizza maker will spend more than that on TV advertising every month. It's nothing in the big scheme of things.

  • Awareness (Score:3, Interesting)

    by Firas Zirie (1179357) on Saturday April 05, 2008 @09:14AM (#22972396)
    To those who are talking about how 2.6 mil is nothing to a pizza chain I ask: How are you going to get the public aware of the fact that pizza.com even exists? Personally, if I wanted pizza I'd type dominospizza.com or pizzahut.com as a first guess at anything pizza related online. Even as a computer literate person I can draw from experience that most generic domain names are link farms and still not go to pizza.com. Maybe the pizza stores have to advertise their new site on tv for another 2..... oh wait
    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by teh kurisu (701097)

      For a while, British Gas were advertising their website as house.co.uk [house.co.uk]. Now, call me crazy, but if I was looking for the British Gas website I would probably type in britishgas.co.uk [britishgas.co.uk] (which is what house.co.uk [house.co.uk] redirects to), or I would type 'British Gas' into Google.

      And if I was typing in house.co.uk [house.co.uk] into my address bar without knowing who owned it, I probably wouldn't be expecting to see the website of a purveyor of piped fossil fuels.

    • Why would you have to? Do you know how much importance Google puts on keywords that are in the URL...
    • Re:Awareness (Score:5, Informative)

      by garett_spencley (193892) on Saturday April 05, 2008 @10:05AM (#22972668) Journal
      Your problem is that you are too smart to understand the business model.

      I am a webmaster and I run a few high traffic web sites. I see people hitting my sites all the time who type in www.mydomain.com into GOOGLE rather than their address bar.

      Not to mention the search engine possibilities. While having pizza.com does not guarantee that you'll be #1 for the search term "pizza" it will help a lot. Especially with the PR it's getting it wouldn't surprise me if it's already #1 due to all the news sites linking to it.

      Also, while I am not a domain squatter, I have read up on the business model. It's not uncommon for people to type things like "bubblegum.com" into their address bar just to see what happens. I heard that the guy who owns bubblegum.com or gum.com or something makes a grand / DAY just having a spam page up (might be a myth but imagine having a few thousand such domains making SOMETHING every day even it's pennies).

      So yeah, 2.6M for pizza.com is a steal, and it's pennies for a big chain like Pizza Hut. And as for your "it's still going to cost something in advertising", assuming it is a big chain that bought the domain, all they have to do is change their flyers and tv ads so that instead of "pizzahut.com" it prints "pizza.com". Their ad budget stays the same.
    • Re:Awareness (Score:5, Insightful)

      by mini me (132455) on Saturday April 05, 2008 @10:41AM (#22972870)

      How are you going to get the public aware of the fact that pizza.com even exists?

      Post a story about it on Slashdot?
  • by BabyDave (575083) on Saturday April 05, 2008 @09:15AM (#22972402)
    ... the domain transfer took more than 30 mins, so it was free.
  • by memorycardfull (1187485) on Saturday April 05, 2008 @09:16AM (#22972410)
    If only their was a homophone for pizza.
    • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

      by Anonymous Coward

      If only their was a homophone for pizza.
      There going to be so pissed, your never going to get moderator points!
  • It takes a while for old stock to clear out. This is especially true for things like real estate and other perceived high value property. This is why we are approaching a year inventory of housing, and for the most part owners are not dropping prices to reduce the supply as demand and financing plummets.

    In any case, the article states nothing of the actual asking price. It could be that the even in a bubble, the asking price was too high, and the owner, seeing a recession, lowered the price. Or it co

    • Nobody wants to sell their house short. The banks taking foreclosures typically want to sell quickly, so they're dropping their prices, which puts price pressure on the other houses.

      Auction.
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by SL Baur (19540)
      TFA only says the domain was bought by an anonymous buyer which probably means that it wasn't an actual Pizza business that bought it.

      The whois for pizza.com still shows Christopher Clark as the owner.

      I'd guess it's along the lines someone wrote earlier - it was bought by a speculator who has some idea of the true value of the domain name. US$2.6M is nothing compared to what those chains spend in advertising.
  • d'oh!! (Score:3, Interesting)

    by Lxy (80823) on Saturday April 05, 2008 @09:47AM (#22972540) Journal
    Back in 1995, my friends and I were looking for domains to register. One of the domains we considered was pizza.com. We decided to skip it, as we didn't want to invest $35/yr on a domain we would probably never use.

    *bangs head on desk*
  • How much would each extra topping be then? $100,000?
  • Two Americas (Score:5, Interesting)

    by Doc Ruby (173196) on Saturday April 05, 2008 @10:04AM (#22972656) Homepage Journal
    A recession and a bubble at the same time? Of course. When oil and bank corps, and the people who own & run them are bathing in record profits (above the records set every year for the past decade and a half, above the records set every year except maybe one or two of every twenty for the past few centuries), but literally millions of people are getting their homes foreclosed, millions more are always 6 weeks paychecks from losing their homes, income has shrunk over the past 25 years while prices have doubled, tripled or more (especially oil/gas prices and bank fees)...

    Of course there's a recession and a bubble possible. Where do you think that bubble money comes from? And do you think that when it pops, everyone loses their shirt? Or maybe the rich people who run the country (*cough* Bear Stearns *cough*) will never see any real risk, while the poor are as free as the rich to sleep under a bridge.

    The biggest lie about "the economy" is that it's "the" economy. There are separate economies for the rich and everyone else, shunted and fed back into each other separately. Except the rich economy has a siphon into the other economy.
    • Re:Two Americas (Score:5, Insightful)

      by Russ Nelson (33911) <slashdot@russnelson.com> on Saturday April 05, 2008 @10:22AM (#22972772) Homepage
      BEAR STEARNS COS THE (NYSE: BSC)
      Last Trade: 10.47
      52wk Range: 2.84 - 159.36

      The stock is down 93.5% from its high last year. You call that "never ... any real risk"? I call you insane.
      • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

        by Doc Ruby (173196)
        Bear Stearns is getting bailed out by the government (taxpayers). JP Morgan is getting the money to by BS from the government (taxpayers).

        Sure, the stock is going to be worth less net now than it was last year. But that high was built on a bubble inflated by money lent from the Fed (taxpayers).

        And even more to the point, Bear Stearns (and its shareholders, brokers and execs) raked in so many $BILLIONS over the past 10-20 years (much of which ultimately came from the Fed - taxpayers) running the way that eve
        • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

          by jlanthripp (244362)
          If by "Fed" you mean the Federal Reserve, you are quite mistaken. You really should find out what the Federal Reserve is before you spout off as if you know what you are talking about. A good starting point is http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Federal_Reserve_System [wikipedia.org].
          • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

            by Doc Ruby (173196)
            You should click a little deeper into at least one of the roles that the Federal Reserve is responsible for, when it lends money to bail out banks [wikipedia.org].
            • Yes, it is the lender of last resort, and that is one of its responsibilities. Now tell me where the Federal Reserve gets that money. You say repeatedly that it gets the money from the taxpayers. This is a faulty premise, and even if it were true, it doesn't affect you personally so why waste energy bitching about it?

              Let's assume that somehow the Federal Reserve has the power to simply take money from the "taxpayers", as you suggest, despite being, as someone else replying to my post pointed out, about as "
        • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

          by radl33t (900691)
          Do you know what your talking about?

          I am suspicious that you do not have the credentials to be making these claims. Both of your posts use adjectives and vague numbers, suggesting to me that this info emanated from the wrong end of your body. Could you provide some concrete evidence? Not that I'm a cheerleader for the US banking system, federal reserve, fed government, plainly corrupt US markets, etc, etc, but you come off a bit delusional.

          Do you think Bear Stearns should have crumbled? Do you want
          • by Doc Ruby (173196)
            I know what I'm talking about. I'm not going to bother with your "credentials" question, because credentials are a fallacy, especially since the army of credentialed people in this country have just dragged us into a nearly intractable banking crisis.

            If you want some evidence of some specific statements, challenge them specifically and I'll supply them.

            As for what I think should have happened to Bear Stearns, of course I think that it should have been regulated to prevent its irresponsible actions before it
    • by LoadWB (592248)
      I'm fine with oil companies making big margins. A good bit of my retirement is invested in them.
      • by Doc Ruby (173196)
        Are you proud of what the corps you own have done to the world you're going to retire in? How much is the blood on your hands worth? Is it worth trashing your children's and grandchildrens's world?

        And if you're going to say that's all made up, is it worth living in denial that it's true?
        • by LoadWB (592248)
          I have no blood on my hands.
          • by Doc Ruby (173196)
            Yes you do. You're an owner of those corporations that are doing all that wrong, and you absolve them of it because you expect to profit by it.

            So is it worth living in denial of that?
    • Re:Two Americas (Score:5, Informative)

      by oni (41625) on Saturday April 05, 2008 @10:44AM (#22972888) Homepage
      *sign*

      1: learn the difference between profit and profit margin.

      2: "millions of people" are not getting losing their homes. You're off by an entire order of magnitude - which makes it pretty clear that you're just spewing hyperbole

      2.a: The majority of the people who will lose their homes *lied* on their applications. That's right. They lied so that they could get a $300k McMansion on their 30k salary. Had they been honest, they couldn't have gotten that big a loan, but then they might have had to *gasp* live within their means, and we Americans just can't have that, now can we.
      • by lysse (516445)

        2: "millions of people" are not getting losing their homes. You're off by an entire order of magnitude

        "500,000s of people"...?
    • by morari (1080535)
      Though your statements ring true, people could always just stop living in debt. I barely have a middle class income, if that, yet I own my residence, property, vehicles, etc. Nothing in the ghetto or falling apart, either! People need to wake up and stop spending more than they can make in imaginary money.
      • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

        That's so 1958. Don't be such a square.
      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by Doc Ruby (173196)
        I live debt-free, and always have. But if these people who bought homes too expensive to afford get to keep them, if the flippers get to keep all their profits, if the banks get to keep all their profits after mismanaging the entire catastrophe, but I've got to pay to bail them out, then I look pretty stupid for not getting in on the action, don't I?

        Which lots of people "smart" enough to have stayed out will also see if that all comes down. And so the next time, the rolls of the exploiters will be full, and
  • by hansamurai (907719) <hansamurai@gmail.com> on Saturday April 05, 2008 @10:35AM (#22972836) Homepage Journal
    I was discussing this at lunch yesterday with some coworkers, and most of us thought it was an incredible waste of money. How many people do you know that when they want something, they open up their browser and just type what they want plus .com right into the address bar? Only complete fools do that and I'm honestly sure that population subset is very small and made up of old people.

    One guy was defending their position rather well though, he basically said that whenever you do non-internet advertising, such as on television or the radio, having a very simple URL is a necessity for having people remember it for later on.
    • by falsified (638041)
      Like someone said earlier, I think what most people do is type the name of a company and then slap a .com on it. I need furniture - I typed in ikea.com, not acouchamattressandmaybesomelamps.com. On a somewhat unrelated note, what's up with movies having bizarre URLs? If you watch a commercial for an upcoming horror movie, for example, instead of advertising saw3.com or sonypictures.com or whatever, it'll be like nobodycanhearyouscream.com. Useless.
    • by Solandri (704621)

      I was discussing this at lunch yesterday with some coworkers, and most of us thought it was an incredible waste of money. How many people do you know that when they want something, they open up their browser and just type what they want plus .com right into the address bar? Only complete fools do that and I'm honestly sure that population subset is very small and made up of old people.

      It's actually a huge market [wikipedia.org] worth hundreds of millions if not billions annually. I couldn't believe it when I first heard a

    • I see at least two uses for pizza.com that could easily be worth $2.6 million:

      1) Some major pizza chain uses it as their modern, easy-to-remember "phone number". If I wanted to order a Domino's Pizza (which I don't), I wouldn't know whether to go to dominos.com, dominospizza.com, dominopizza.com, domino-pizza.com, etc. Putting pizza.com in their conventional advertising and repeating it for years would eventually get a lot of people going there.

      2) An independent business makes it easy to find and order pi
  • Bubble & Recession? (Score:4, Interesting)

    by Anna Merikin (529843) on Saturday April 05, 2008 @10:57AM (#22972958) Journal

    Can their be a bubble and a recession at the same time, or do the two cancel each other out like Penn & Teller?

    Of course there can, and that's exactly what is happening. There is too much venture capital out there and few good places to invest it. There is a recession because oil and other commodities have cut into corporate profits and a bubble because billions of VC funding is available, due to GWB's tax cuts for the rich.

    Reagan's trickle-down policies caused a simiilar bubble (in derivatives) in 1987, A decade later, more easy Fed money caused Venture Capitalists to invest in high-tech stocks, causing the famous dot-com bubble and bust.

    A recession is when lots of poor and middle class people lose their jobs; a bubble is when a few VCs all decide to put their money in the same place at the same time, driving up prices but not value or production.

    Which is what's happening now.

    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by kz45 (175825)
      "Of course there can, and that's exactly what is happening. There is too much venture capital out there and few good places to invest it. There is a recession because oil and other commodities have cut into corporate profits and a bubble because billions of VC funding is available, due to GWB's tax cuts for the rich"

      Are you "rich" or are you just speculating on the tax cuts. People making > $100,000 have to pay between 30-50% in taxes. This isn't fair for people that actually want to make money.

      The US
      • Are you "rich" or are you just speculating on the tax cuts. People making > $100,000 have to pay between 30-50% in taxes.

        [Checks December pay stub] Oooh, what a giveaway. No way are you making more than $100,000.

        This isn't fair for people that actually want to make money.

        I like this. The "people who don't actually want to make money" are taking advantage of everybody else. That's rich.
  • Why ridiculous? (Score:5, Insightful)

    by smackenzie (912024) on Saturday April 05, 2008 @11:06AM (#22973014)
    Why is 2.6M for one of the most recognized words in the English (and other) languages ridiculous?
    Dominos Pizza Market Cap: $843,000,000
    Papa John's Market Cap: $725,000,000
    Pizza Hut 2007 Sales: $26,000,000
  • He owns both armor.com and armour.com he has bee approached by folks looking to buy one or the other (or both) names ... but he has never been even offered even serious six figures. Even the Hormel people never came up with real cash. Meh.
  • Just because one item sold expensively doesn't mean the recession is impossible anyways.
  • Bubble and recession at the same time? Uh... this is just one company buying a domain name for $2.6M. Taken in isolation this information tells us nothing other than the fact that one company thought that particular domain name was worth $2.6M.

    Besides, no bubble brings all prices sky high, and no recession ever brings all pricing to the floor. Whatever the larger economic picture, there will always be companies taking risks and companies playing it safe.

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