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2008 Google Summer of Code Highlights

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  • GRUB GUI? (Score:2, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward
    Adding a GUI to the upcoming GRUB 2 because its black and white terminal interface is scary? Doesn't GRUB already have a GUI? That pretty blue screen at bootup?
    • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday May 17, 2008 @04:10PM (#23447498)
      Blue screen at bootup?

      Must... resist... urge... to make... Windows BSOD.... joke... aaaaaaargh!
    • Re:GRUB GUI? (Score:5, Insightful)

      by Knuckles (8964) <knuckles@nOsPaM.dantian.org> on Saturday May 17, 2008 @04:59PM (#23447760)
      Editing menu.lst hardly qualifies as a GUI.
    • Re:GRUB GUI? (Score:5, Interesting)

      by Z-MaxX (712880) on Saturday May 17, 2008 @07:45PM (#23448928) Journal
      The "Legacy" version of GRUB (latest release is 0.97), currently used by most Linux distributions, has been patched by various distros to support background images in a graphical console mode. However, there is no support in GRUB 2, where all GRUB development is currently taking place. I am going to add a basic GUI to GRUB that will surpass the patches for GRUB 0.9x in portability and flexibility. Once the graphical menu support is added (my GSoC'08 project), adding mouse support will be relatively straightforward... ;-) From http://www.gnu.org/software/grub/grub-soc.html [gnu.org] under "Fancy menu interface":

      This feature is really important for GRUB 2, because GRUB Legacy has been patched by third parties frequently, as the official version never support a graphical interface, but such an interface attracts more casual users. Support for a fancy menu - even better than an unofficial patch for GRUB Legacy - would attract more people to GRUB 2, thus this is critical in a long term to accelerate the development.
      I plan to make the code portable to non-x86 architectures (though at first VESA VBE 2.0 on PC architecture will be the only supported video driver). More details at: http://gibibit.com/grub-gsoc/proposal.html [gibibit.com]
  • E17? (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Doobian Coedifier (316239) on Saturday May 17, 2008 @04:06PM (#23447492)

    Cross-platform is now officially the hottest thing for desktop environments. First, KDE announced that KDE 4 was being ported to Windows and OS X. Now, the lesser known Enlightenment project is doing the same thing. Student Dzmitry Mazouka is now porting the Ewl and Etk libraries to the Win32 platform.
    How about finishing Enlightenment 0.17? I've been waiting for almost 8 years now...
    • Re:E17? (Score:5, Funny)

      by TheRealMindChild (743925) on Saturday May 17, 2008 @04:09PM (#23447496) Homepage Journal
      Then get to it, damnit.
    • Re:E17? (Score:5, Funny)

      by dfedfe (980539) on Saturday May 17, 2008 @04:12PM (#23447522)
      Patience.

      It is this very attachment and craving that keeps you from attaining it.

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by CRCulver (715279)
      I've been using the CVS for three years now and have encountered instability extremely rarely. I don't know if raster will ever actually make an official release, but e17 is the best window manager I've ever used even if it is still in a development limbo.
    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by shish (588640)
      One of the 20-odd libraries it uses reached 1.0 status last week \o/
  • by 3seas (184403) on Saturday May 17, 2008 @04:10PM (#23447504) Journal
    http://wiki.dragonflybsd.org/index.cgi/GoogleSoC2008 [dragonflybsd.org]

    DragonFly Projects

    Enhance dma

    * Max Lindner, mentored by Matthias Schmidt
    * See EnhanceDmaGSoC for more information

    Port DragonFly to the AMD64 architecture

    * Jordan Gordeev, mentored by Thomas E. Spanjaard
    * See AMD64GSoC for more information.

    RFC3542 support

    * Dashu Huang, mentored by Hasso Tepper
    * The standard application program interface (API) for TCP/IP applications is the "sockets" interface. Although this API was developed for Unix in the early 1980s, it has also been implemented on DragonFly BSD with support for IPv6 applications. Today, to fit new demands, the API standard that support IPv6 applications has experience some changes from RFC2292 to RFC3542. However, the DragonFly BSD operating system now only support RFC2292, and it don't support RFC3542 advanced sockets API, to make it catch up the change, we need to make it support RFC3542. To make DragonFly BSD support RFC3542. My work will research the codes of current IPv6 stack in DragonFly BSD and understand how it works. At the same time, I should understand some related RFC, and how other BSD's such as FreeBSD, openBSD, merged RFC3542. Through this way, I can figure out which part of the old IPv6 stack should be improved. Finally,I will update the old IPv6 stack to make it support RFC3542.

    Extend Multi-Processing (MP) support

    * Robert Luciani, mentored by Simon Schubert
    * Back in 2003 when DragonFly was born, the first subsystem to be implemented was the LWKT. The reduction in complexity achieved by using message passing (as opposed to a shared memory environment using locks) was undeniable. What was also "unlocked" though, was the potential for near linear performance scaling on multiple CPU systems. Unfortunately many kernel systems, such as the network stack, need to be modified to take advantage of this potential, since they are still encumbered by a legacy "Big Giant Lock". In this project I will remove the MP lock in important areas of the kernel that have a direct affect on the performance of popular programs such as PostgreSQL.

    Proportional share userland scheduling algorithm

    * Mayur Narayan Bhosle, mentored by Jeffrey Hsu
    * Proportional share algorithms like lottery scheduling, Stride scheduling algorithm guarantee proportional share of resources like (CPU) to a processes as per their requirement stated specified during the start. The traditional schedulers achieve fairness or resource allocation by adjusting priority, but the effect is observed over a long term. But instead in case of proportional share schedulers we observe the fairness of allocation over a bounded period of time when we adjust the requirement of resources dynamically.

    Anticipatory disk I/O scheduler

    * Nirmal Thacker, mentored by Simon Schubert
    * This project aims at developing an Anticipatory Disk I/O scheduler for DragonFlyBSD. An Anticipatory Disk I/O scheduler will ensure that an anticipation heuristic will nullify all possible deceptive idleness between consecutive disk accesses and at the same time try to maintain an overall good throughput. In the DragonFly BSD operating system it must also take into consideration the MP- safety factors.

    LiveCD with a DragonFly-specific X desktop

    * Louisa Luciani, mentored by Sascha Wildner
    * In this project I will integrate more functionality into the nrelease build system. The build will generate a persistent liveCD with Dragonfly specific features. It will be customized for recovery, demonstr
  • by RiotingPacifist (1228016) on Saturday May 17, 2008 @04:13PM (#23447526)
    Since VLCs firefox plugin is incompatible with noscript, I've started using mplayer, and as its modular (unlike VLC) I can also throw almost anything at it (actually I can throw more at it as it handles realmedia too). As for interfaces well i personally think Kmplayer beats VLC hands down as a media player too.

    I also dont understand the need for a frontend to aptitude, apt + front end is just as powerful, its only dependency resolution that hasn't been well implemented in other front ends.
    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by kdekorte (8768)
      Have you ever tried the updated version of mplayerplug-in?

      Gecko-mediaplayer (browser plugin) and gnome-mplayer (clean GTK GUI for mplayer that gecko-mediaplayer uses over dbus) really try and give the best browser plugin support for firefox on linux.

      You can find out more about them here: http://dekorte.homeip.net/download/ [homeip.net]
    • Yeah I've never actually had VLC installed on my computer.

      Mplayer does everything I need to do and quite a few things I dont need to do. ;)
    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by Chris Pimlott (16212)
      I like them both. But to get back to the subject of browser plugins, while the mplayer plugin is miles ahead of VLC on UI friendliness, I have to give VLC top marks on performance.

      mplayer seems very conservative about pre-buffering before starting playback and doesn't seem to change anything when I try to adjust the buffer size in preferences. It doesn't always respond directly to commands (like play, or seeking in a stream), which often sets it to more buffering (even when it already seemed to have loade
    • I also dont understand the need for a frontend to aptitude, apt + front end is just as powerful

      Aptitude is a front end to apt, so technically your statement is correct. Basically the hierarchy goes: dpkg -> apt -> aptitude/apt-get/synaptic/dselect/etc.

      Aptitude is already far more powerful than apt-get and dselect, and probably more powerful than synaptic (although I haven't used synaptic, so I couldn't say for certain). This project is intended to add a graphical interface, to compliment the curses an
  • by John Hasler (414242) on Saturday May 17, 2008 @04:14PM (#23447538) Homepage
    Nope. I see nothing there that will be on my machine in the foreseeable future.
    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by Vectronic (1221470)
      Agreed, the only thing that sparked any interest from that list was GRUB2, which isn't really even on the list, just some crappy fancy nonsense theme thing for it...

      Me and GRUB have never gotten along, but maybe me and GRUB2 will...

      Aside from that, that list is just a bunch of Gadgets/Widget/Nonsense... im not sure why the Editor/Poster just didnt do a write-up and link to http://code.google.com/soc/2008/ [google.com] or something a little more diverse and interesting.
      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        Until grub2 has a security module so that i can lock down what you can boot too, im happy with grub, even if grub2 looks nice.

        Hell i have 1 second time-out & hidden menu so i never see it anyway, grub doesn't need any nice interface as it shouldn't need to be seen other than when you have a problem in which case a nice UI just adds another thing to go wrong.
        • by Z-MaxX (712880) on Saturday May 17, 2008 @08:03PM (#23449062) Journal
          A nice UI may be more important for a Live CD install/rescue disk, for instance, where there are many choices, and you want it to simple to use and self-explanatory for any user booting the disk. Also, GRUB 2 uses dynamically loadable modules for virtually everything, so you can just not load the future 'gfxmenu' module if you like. Then it will consume no memory and will not be a possible source of problems.
      • Personally, I would prefer it if somebody would get GRUB 2 "production ready" first, instead of making fancy GUI menus for it.

        Maybe it's just me, but I'd really like the ability to boot from LVM and get proper EFI support (though not really an issue until EFI is in wide distribution for x86) without having to install an experimental package.

        It's a bootloader, guys. Functional first, form later.
        • by Z-MaxX (712880) on Saturday May 17, 2008 @07:56PM (#23449012) Journal

          Many GRUB developers are working diligently toward a production ready version of GRUB 2. I am a new contributor to the GRUB project and the reason I chose this feature to implement is because it meshes with my areas of expertise and interest. Also, I feel that making GRUB 2 usable by everyone (let's face it, right now that means it has to be supported by Ubuntu) is a very important goal. In order for Ubuntu to adopt GRUB 2, it will have to not only be functionally complete, but they will want it to look nice too, as the rest of the OS will.

          No argument that it will be great to have GRUB 2 production ready. I am looking forward to it, and I hope I can contribute to other features after I complete the graphical menu system.

          Colin

        • Also, the article did not mention the other GRUB 2 project in the Summer of Code. There is another GSoC student, Macro Gerards, working on adding USB support to GRUB 2 so you can use USB storage devices and HID devices. This will be great to have. http://code.google.com/soc/2008/gnu/appinfo.html?csaid=E0D9A2E69F7D3637 [google.com]

          Title: GRUB2: USB Support
          Student: Marco Gerards
          Mentor: Robert Millan
          Abstract:
          During Summer of Code 2008 I will (when I am accepted) implement USB support for GRUB 2. After fin

    • by aliquis (678370)
      Yeah, I read this article on Osnews earlier I think and I didn't get stiff by the projects mentioned either. Maybe the Pidgin webcam/voip-part will work but except that meh.

      And there are LOTS of work in LOTS of projects which will be done, so only 21 things are way to little. Just look thru the official list instead.
      http://code.google.com/soc/2008/ [google.com]
    • Yep; nothing in this list excited me at all.
  • Server dying (Score:3, Informative)

    by Anonymous Coward on Saturday May 17, 2008 @04:15PM (#23447542)
    Coral Cache link: http://www.freesoftwaremagazine.com.nyud.net/columns/2008_google_summer_code_21_projects_im_excited_about [nyud.net]

    -FST (anonymous to prevent karma whoring)
  • Waste of time... (Score:1, Informative)

    by Anonymous Coward
    A link to the GSoC page is more interesting and the author couldn't have picked projects that interested me less.

    The photo tagging stuff Re: gallery made me laugh, are google sponsoring weekend projects now?
    • by phinze (877171)

      The photo tagging stuff Re: gallery made me laugh, are google sponsoring weekend projects now?

      As the student who is working on this project, I understand that it may seem like something that could be hacked together in a few days, but I do think that there is quite a bit of work involved in doing it The Right Way. If the new set of features is to be integrated properly with the rest of the Gallery project, there are many design decisions and implementation details to consider, as well as extensive testing that must be done. If you are interested in tracking my progress, I will be keeping a develo [phinze.com]

  • Amarok UPnP rediscover your music elsewhere
    - Provide a plug-in to Amarok that will allow users to discover and stream from remote UPnP shares. This plug-in will discover any UPnP MediaServer DCPs on the local network and display their collections as an Amarok collection.

    - The plug-in will also provide the capability to control the current instance of Amarok from a remote UPnP ControlPoint. Since UPnP provides no authentication measures, users will be allowed to turn this feature off. Alternatively, an authe
  • by i.of.the.storm (907783) on Saturday May 17, 2008 @04:32PM (#23447608) Homepage
    My personal favorites are the project to add Voice and Video to pidgin and the Pidgin theming project. http://developer.pidgin.im/wiki/GSoC2008/VoiceAndVideo [pidgin.im] and http://developer.pidgin.im/wiki/GSoC2008/ThemeImprovements [pidgin.im] . People always ask for these things and the developers don't have time to do things that they don't use, so they never get done. Hopefully these actually get done by the end of this summer.
    • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

      by Yogiz (1123127)
      After the developers pissed a lot of people off, Pidgin was forked and among other things Funpidgin [sourceforge.net] promises voice and video support as well. I think they'll pull it off before the Google guys.
      • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

        Honestly, I think not. I've seen their stuff, and it's not exactly impressive to readd some features that Pidgin used to have. I emailed the developers about just releasing their features as pidgin plugins but I got a reply that they didn't know how to.
      • Also, the input area resizing thing was changed in Pidgin 2.4.2 which was released today. And vv support has been worked on for a while in a Pidgin branch so they've already got a foundation on the stuff, and people who have been working on it for a while. The guy with the SoC project has been working on it for some time prior to now.
    • by SD-Arcadia (1146999) on Saturday May 17, 2008 @05:32PM (#23447950) Homepage
      From the pidgin FAQ: "Why are file transfers so slow? MSN file transfer support is limited to the proxied version of file transfer support in the protocol. This means that the files are sent to MSN's servers, then the server sends the data to the other user. We don't know if or when we will ever support any of the peer-to-peer file transfer methods available in the MSN protocol." What would it take to add direct connection transfer support to Pidgin so I can actually send someone a file on MSN? Currently it maxes out around 4KB/s which is useless. I always wondered why this is not a priority.
      • by 99BottlesOfBeerInMyF (813746) on Saturday May 17, 2008 @08:01PM (#23449044)

        What would it take to add direct connection transfer support to Pidgin so I can actually send someone a file on MSN? Currently it maxes out around 4KB/s which is useless. I always wondered why this is not a priority.

        I imagine support for all closed, legacy formats is a pretty low priority. Why prioritize reverse engineering and optimizing less used features of an intentionally obfuscated format championed by someone trying to prevent the type of interoperability that is Pidgin's goal? Isn't it better for them to optimize file transfer over XMMP or the video and voice capabilities? I mean, if you want to transfer files with other users, there are plenty of other protocols that do work and where the Pidgin team doesn't have to work so hard only to have it intentionally broken by Microsoft at a later date. It is an inefficient use of their resources compared to working on core features using open protocols where they don't have to put in all that extra effort to overcome MS's antics.

        • by aliquis (678370)
          + one billion.

          I use Adium which is somewhat based on Pidgin and the slow MSN transfers do annoy me, but only because more or less everyone for some stupid reason use MSN. It works perfect with ICQ (and probably Jabber) and webcam and voip support for Jabber are so much cooler than fast file transfers over MSN.

          With webcam and voip in Jabber there are very few reasons not to use Jabber, except noone else use it.
        • by kjamez (10960)
          +infinity ... I don't use Pigdin / GAIM any longer, but your well-worded battle cry about prioritizing resources is key, and deserves mod points.
        • Because people, you know, actually use MSN and other formats? For some people, MSN is a killer application - if you install Linux for them and tell them "Sorry, you can't talk to your buddies on MSN anymore", they will say "Give me Windows back". If you think for one second that you think my sister will switch if it means she cannot chat with her friends... think again.
          • by bit01 (644603)

            Because people, you know, actually use MSN and other formats?

            Yeap, and because they're using it today they'll be using tomorrow. And because they'll be using tomorrow they'll be using it the next day. In fact, they'll be using it for the rest of eternity. Particularly if M$ has any say in the matter.

            Sometimes short term pain is worth it for long term gain.

            ---

            Beware deceptive astroturfers [wikipedia.org].

        • Funny; in my mind, interoperability also includes providing back compatibility for MSN, the "legacy" protocol which happens to be the most widely deployed instant messaging protocol.

          A devil's advocate might posit that putting effort into developing XMPP (taking pains to point out your spelling error "XMMP") is more of a waste than trying to track MSN's upgrades, because of the deployment size, but as someone who runs ejabberd in his basement... :)
          • Funny; in my mind, interoperability also includes providing back compatibility for MSN, the "legacy" protocol which happens to be the most widely deployed instant messaging protocol.

            While I've read widely differing statistics on IM market share, I haven't seen any put MSN as more than 25% of the worldwide market and significantly less for the US market. Pidgin does provide interoperability with MSN and even supports file transfers. What they don't do is waste a lot of time optimizing that minor feature, over and over again as Microsoft changes it again and again.

            A devil's advocate might posit that putting effort into developing XMPP (taking pains to point out your spelling error "XMMP") is more of a waste than trying to track MSN's upgrades, because of the deployment size, but as someone who runs ejabberd in his basement... :)

            Adding features to XMPP has to be done once and can be done based upon the spec. Adding the same feature for MSN has to b

    • by SeaFox (739806)
      I'll believe it when I see it in a finished release. I seem to remember voice/video support being a SoC project for Pidgin a couple years ago, and that work seemingly went into the garbage can because it was never actually implemented in the project.
  • x264 is proud to announce that we have four students this year through the Videolan project; they will be working on frametype decision, more efficient inter-macroblock search, better psychovisual optimizations, assembly and profiling improvements, and an interesting tree project that will track the use of data throughout the video stream to maximize the quality of pixels that are referenced the most in future frames.

    After 6 months of improvement [multimedia.cx] resulting in two major visual optimizations and a 30% spee
    • These optimizations are nice, but leave out the most obvious and important improvement to the codecs that have yet to be made. Most processors sold nowadays are 2 or more cores. And smooth single-threaded processing of 1080p x264 is impossible on all but the absolute highest end processors. So the most important step is obvious multi-threading. There's a summer of code project for that too. [google.com] I'm surprised the author of the article missed it.
      • by Silverlancer (786390) on Saturday May 17, 2008 @07:36PM (#23448872)
        Except that x264 is already the most efficient multithreaded encoder in the open source world. I don't see what you mean; there is no such thing as an x264 "video format"; its called H.264, and given that x264 is an encoder and not a decoder, it isn't exactly our job to do multithreading, given that we don't even have a decoder to implement such a thing in!
  • Obvious but will be nice.
  • Cross-Platform? (Score:1, Interesting)

    by Anonymous Coward

    Cross-platform is now officially the hottest thing for desktop environments. First, KDE announced that KDE 4 was being ported to Windows and OS X.

    I, for one, don't care if KDE is available for Windows or Mac OS X. These OS already have their own GUI, why would we want to install something else?

    The "choice is good" mantra doesn't apply. Windows should look and act like Windows, and Mac OS X should look and act like Mac OS X.

    Next thing you know, we have idiots coding things without the OS built-in GUI and we

    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by gigne (990887)
      They are not porting Plasma or the KDE UI to Windows/Mac, just the core libs to allow KDE programs to run in other operating systems. As KDE apps are QT based, they mostly use the native widgets, and full native look and feel is in the works for Mac.

      For you this means Windows looks like Windows, and Mac looks like Mac. The running application may be written for KDE, but this doesn't matter anymore.
      • For you this means Windows looks like Windows, and Mac looks like Mac. The running application may be written for KDE, but this doesn't matter anymore.

        While I applaud the efforts to make these libraries/environments cross platform, I think your comment is a bit misleading. Anything written in these is still obviously a port. It is better than having to run under an X server, but still not exactly native for speed or features compared to software written with native toolkits. From what I've read, for example, KDE apps run on OS X to not automatically gain the features OS X offers to native applications, like universal spellchecking, grammar checking, and

        • by gigne (990887)
          Thanks for adding some clarity to my comment.

          I agree that the core libs are a port, as there are a serious amount changes under the hood. Do you consider an application a port if no code changes occur and it builds and runs using the native widgets in an OS?

          Recent versions of QT use the native widgets for Mac [1] without changes. There are always cases where an application taken from the Windows centric UI style (KDE, Win32) to OSX might need some extra code to make it look more OSXy, but QT at least tries
          • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

            I agree that the core libs are a port, as there are a serious amount changes under the hood. Do you consider an application a port if no code changes occur and it builds and runs using the native widgets in an OS?

            I guess it doesn't matter much what I consider a port, but when users are accustomed to features working across all their applications on an OS, when they don't, well they throw that application into the same bin as OpenOffice and often look for better more "native" solutions; regardless of whether or not the application was originated on another OS.

            Recent versions of QT use the native widgets for Mac [1] without changes. There are always cases where an application taken from the Windows centric UI style (KDE, Win32) to OSX might need some extra code to make it look more OSXy, but QT at least tries to give you a leg up.

            Certainly they make an effort to make things closer to the experience with native applications, but they also try to reuse as much as possible, which often

    • by Haeleth (414428)

      Next thing you know, we have idiots coding things without the OS built-in GUI and we end up with crappy programs that look out of place and behave completely different to the whole OS and all other programs.

      And nobody will care, if the programs do something they want.

      Just look at the Windows version of iTunes for an example of a program that looks totally out of place, or at Excel for one that behaves completely differently to every other Microsoft program, even in terms of how it handles fundamental operat

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by aliquis (678370)
      KDE are way better than the UI in Windows and may be better than OS X ones aswell thought. I run OS X but could see myself use KDE. Especially with Amarok and Kopete.
  • Dojo (Score:2, Informative)

    by moshez (67187)
    The Dojo toolkit is going to get some love this SoC -- these things might be making their way into your machine even without you knowing it... Markup Previews [dojotoolkit.org], 3D effects [dojotoolkit.org] and Drag&Drop form editor [dojotoolkit.org] are all among the SoC projects this year.
  • by Anonymous Coward
    What's so great about Ruslan Uhjbilatov that he gets his name in Cyrillic but Dzmitry Mazouka in Belarus doesn't?
  • by GrAfFiT (802657) on Saturday May 17, 2008 @05:20PM (#23447892) Homepage
    Hi, I'm the Aptitude-gtk applicant.
    If you've used both Synaptic and Aptitude, you should have seen some differences :)
    The dependency resolution is one point, but it's not only that. The whole navigation in Aptitude is just much more efficient. Ever used Synaptic in a mixed-distribution install ? Say you want to install another version of a package and it has some different dependencies. Good luck navigating them in Synaptic. It's really not designed with that in mind.
    You can see the full application here [milliways.fr] and my development blog here [milliways.fr] .
    I warmly welcome any input on my project!
  • at less than 2% (Score:5, Informative)

    by morrison (40043) on Saturday May 17, 2008 @05:37PM (#23447978) Homepage
    Kudos to the few mentioned that will get some extra attention from this, but it's worth noting that the coverage doesn't represent even 2% of the projects that will be going on. I'd even go so far to say as many of those listed aren't even some of the most impressive or realistic, just one person's sampling of a few they know about.

    Captain obvious points out that highlighting even just one project for half of the participating orgs would be about 88 projects and would still represent less than 8%. There's also no guarantee that the student will be successful on their project. About one in five students failed last year, so nothing is guaranteed regardless.

    My point? There is a LOT of cool stuff being worked on. Check the projects out for yourself at http://code.google.com/soc/2008/ [google.com]
    They're all listed. Show your support, get involved, help them succeed if you really care.

    • by kjamez (10960)
      +1 to you, captain obvious. Here we have Google, paying a bunch of students for successfully contributing to Open Source. Some of those students will continue to contribute, and some may even become prolific Open Source community members. Win-win.
  • All I have to say about the plan to put widgets into the KDE screensaver is "why?" -- The purpose of the screensaver is to be there while you are not.

    I suppose having passive widgets that merely display information could be useful, but as TFA references using it to post to twitter and crap, I can't say it sounds particularly useful.
  • 1. Why the hell has it taken this long to get a Voice Recognition front end implemented?

    2. Who decided that tomboy notes is a worthy front end?!?! Who uses tomboy notes? Couldn't we have something that would allow us to use speech to text in a way which is useful?
    • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

      by Daengbo (523424)
      I blogged about this project last month, so I've had time to think about the "why"s of it. My conclusions were:
      1. Whether it's a Tomboy project or not is really irrelevant because the speech-to-text part will probably be a library, anyway.
      2. Putting the functionality in a note-taking application is probably a good choice because the software doesn't need to do real-time conversion. You record the note, close it, allow the software to convert to speech while you're working on stuff, and when you come bac
    • I definitely would have preferred something else (the only frontend that I can even find is Perlbox, which doesn't work for me), but you can't have em all. Like Daengbo said, it will probably become a library. I hope so, anyway.
  • What a waste (Score:2, Interesting)

    by vux984 (928602)
    the grub gui, if its actually any good will eventually get installed on my desktop linux machines...

    The rest of the crud the article mentioned? Wow... what a completely uninspiring and underwhelming list.

    Oooh ... another rss solution? ooxml for abiword? bragging rights for game I've never heard of? Theming support for Pidgin? VLC for Windows CE? I can gaurantee you that I'm not going to EVER go out of my way to install ANY of that crud.

    Not that I have a problem with people working on its... its their time.
  • > Pidgin's clean interface is one of its strongest points ..

    Oh my .. where do I begin .. :) I saw the following elsewhere,
    and I think it's pretty accurate summary of the situation -

    > Pidgin is an IM client designed and coded by programmers.
    > Trillian is an IM client designed and coded by UI designers.

    While ideally designers should design and programmers - code.

  • As the article mentions Google ended up funding a number of Gaming projects. There are a total of 7 game projects and 5 game related projects for a total of over 40 slots.

    The following game projects have been accepted,

    • Battle for Wesnoth [wesnoth.org] (projects [google.com]), a very cool turn based strategy game in the theme of Heroes of Might and Magic.
    • BZFlag [bzflag.org] (projects [google.com]), the classic tank first person shooter game. One of the oldest open source games around!
    • Linden Lab [lindenlab.com] (projects [google.com]), the makers of Second Lif

Parts that positively cannot be assembled in improper order will be.

Working...