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Social Networks The Internet Privacy Your Rights Online

Logged In or Out, Facebook Is Watching You 336

Posted by timothy
from the damn-addictive-scrabulous-and-cute-iris-chang dept.
kaos07 links to this ZDNet story, according to which "Researchers at software vendor CA have discovered that social networking site Facebook is able to track the buying habits of its users on affiliated third-party sites even when they are logged out of their account or have opted out of its controversial 'Beacon' tracking service. Responding to privacy concerns, Facebook has since moved to reassure users that it only tracks and publishes data about their purchases if they are both logged in to Facebook and have opted-in to having this information listed on their profile. But in 'extremely disconcerting' findings that directly contradict these assurances, researchers at CA's Security Advisory service have found that data about these transactions are sent to Facebook regardless of a user's actions."
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Logged In or Out, Facebook Is Watching You

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  • Well (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Thursday July 17, 2008 @01:51PM (#24231719)

    Only if you have a Facebook account.

    • There is nothing to prevent them from recording ALL transactions reported to them by their affiliates and either associating them with you when you do create an account OR even if you never create an Facebook account attempting to maintain a dossier of transactions which Facebook believes are likely to have been made by the same person. This is why one should never provide accurate information concerning one's identity online unless it is absolutely necessary. If you are not feeling creative then you can al
      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by vux984 (928602)

        There is nothing to prevent them from recording ALL transactions reported to them by their affiliates and either associating them with you when you do create an account OR even if you never create an Facebook account attempting to maintain a dossier of transactions which Facebook believes are likely to have been made by the same person. This is why one should never provide accurate information concerning one's identity online unless it is absolutely necessary. If you are not feeling creative then you can al

        • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

          by CodeBuster (516420)

          they need a real address, creditcard, etc in which to bill you and send you your goods. So you can't really lie there, even if you wanted to.

          The real address can be either a mail drop or an address controlled by a private trust [wikipedia.org]. It is the same thing with the credit card, it is in the name of the trust which is managed by the private trustee who remains legally anonymous behind the trust. IANAL, but it is common knowledge that trusts are used by politically well connected and other high profile people so that they may conduct business publicly without revealing their true interests or identities (or at least without making them blatantly obvious

          • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

            by vux984 (928602)

            The real address can be either a mail drop or an address controlled by a private trust.

            It all depends upon how much you value your privacy and how much you are able and willing to spend to protect it, but there are ways.

            Sure, you could also just not buy anything online, and show up in person wearing sunglasses, a veil, gloves, and cash... that's not really the point here though.

            Well cry me a river, why should people give a crap about their terms of service?

            Only a complete idiot would use a service without u

    • by philspear (1142299) on Thursday July 17, 2008 @03:03PM (#24232951)

      They also can only track you if you use a computer!

    • Re:Well (Score:5, Informative)

      by bartok (111886) on Thursday July 17, 2008 @03:40PM (#24233569)

      If you use Firefox you can also block it:
      http://www.ideashower.com/blog/block-facebook-beacon/ [ideashower.com]

  • Shocked (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Romancer (19668) <romancer@deaths d o o r .com> on Thursday July 17, 2008 @01:52PM (#24231739) Journal

    I'm shocked that you're shocked. Or even expect me to be mildly surprised that this is happening.

    The only difference is that this is supposed to be a larger company and therefore better than the millions of smaller opt out pipe dreams out there?

    • Re:Shocked (Score:5, Interesting)

      by Yold (473518) on Thursday July 17, 2008 @02:07PM (#24232015)

      I disabled my facebook account a few months ago because it occurred to me that someone is probably harvesting all the data that they can find off that site. Being someone who parties (too much ;-) ), I was constantly deleting tagged pictures of myself drinking off that website. I was damn glad that I did, because my BOSS at my uni went on looked at my facebook account before he hired me.

      It would not suprise me if someone started offering money to purchase facebook accounts, just to harvest information, for say the price of $0.10 a friend w/ an account. I have a wild imagination, but with data mining being a really hot field, who knows what could be done with this information, it might even cost me a job in the future.

      The future of privacy (or lack thereof), has me vigilant, even paranoid.

      • Re:Shocked (Score:5, Insightful)

        by ivan256 (17499) on Thursday July 17, 2008 @02:16PM (#24232167)

        I'm constantly amazed about how people will post private information in a public place (thus making it public information), and then complain about how they are being robbed of their privacy.

        Of course it also amazes me how popular these social networking sites are with adults. It's understandable that kids and teenagers want to climb a social ladder of sorts, since it is human nature to attempt to achieve more than your peers, and there is little available in the environments we provide to kids other than social hierarchy to climb... But when you grow up, generally people move on to trying to get ahead in other types of accomplishments. It seems things like MySpace and Facebook have extended High School into adulthood. When you place that much value on your social network, perhaps it shouldn't be too surprising that people are willing to give up their privacy to maintain it.

        • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

          by D Ninja (825055)

          Ahhh...but, don't you know? High School Never Ends [sing365.com].

        • Re:Shocked (Score:5, Interesting)

          by brunes69 (86786) <slashdot@NospAm.keirstead.org> on Thursday July 17, 2008 @02:29PM (#24232395) Homepage

          What amazes me is that peple think that your prospective employer actually gives a crap if you party on the weekends.

          Has it ever occurred to you that maybe you don't want to work somewhere who cares about that anyway? If an employer cares what an employee is doing in their off time then they have already crossed the line IMO.

          • Re:Shocked (Score:5, Interesting)

            by Yold (473518) on Thursday July 17, 2008 @02:49PM (#24232729)

            In a perfect world, yes. But the ideal picture of a programmer/math-dude isn't being at the end of a beer bong.

            I think that once you are employed, it doesn't matter what you do on the weekends. But at a job interview, I'd rather not have someone know how I spend my Friday nights.

            • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

              by Abcd1234 (188840)

              So, what is that ideal picture? Personally, I've met programmers and math types that are all over the map, personality-wise. And, frankly, I would consider avoiding the overly bookish, socially inept types, given that one's job as a programmer is, above all things, to communicate with others and to, you know, socially interact with them.

          • Re:Shocked (Score:5, Insightful)

            by deraj123 (1225722) on Thursday July 17, 2008 @03:04PM (#24232963)

            There's a difference between "party on the weekends" and a photo history of you making a lot of poor decisions. Think, pictures of inappropriate jokes, pictures of you not just drunk, but completely obliterated, pictures of you breaking the law, etc.

            If I'm hiring somebody, I don't care if they go out drinking on the weekends (in fact, I might be concerned if they didn't occasionally), but I would probably think twice if presented with evidence of them making repeated, poor, destructive decisions.

            Decision making is a trait that translates over to work.

            • by Abcd1234 (188840)

              Meh, that's what reference checks are for. If the person has a history of good work, who cares what they do in their off time?

          • Re:Shocked (Score:4, Interesting)

            by Anonymous Coward on Thursday July 17, 2008 @03:07PM (#24233025)

            I once had an applicate who said "My life's goal is to be the laziest person on earth" in her myspace profile. We didn't hire her, things like that matter.

            • Re:Shocked (Score:5, Insightful)

              by philspear (1142299) on Thursday July 17, 2008 @03:17PM (#24233201)

              Right, because that couldn't have possibly been humor.

              Hell, the fact that she was applying for a job should have clued you off that it was a lie.

              Not for nothing, but applying to jobs is annoying, and while we all must do it, that doesn't make it any easier. It's tedious paperwork, waiting, not getting paid, and half the time those of you who are hiring don't have the courtesy to let us know we're not getting the job. If you decided not to hire her based on something as trivial as that and that alone, you're an asshole.

            • by Abcd1234 (188840)

              Good thing, too. For her. Sounds like she has a sense of humour, while you don't.

            • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

              by WDot (1286728)
              An applicant you mean? I don't know if I'd like to work for an employer who can't spell.

              http://www.thefreedictionary.com/Applicate [thefreedictionary.com]

              See how silly that is? It's an honest mistake, and here I am condemning you for it. I'm even suggesting that you can't spell AT ALL, even though you only made one mistake in the whole post. I'm making sweeping generalizations about your literacy based on a post on the Internet.

              If you cut out applicants based on whether they have a squeaky clean Internet Posting Record
          • by STrinity (723872)
            I know a guy who tried to join a police department and was turned down because of his MySpace page, which looks like it belongs to Travis Bickle. The guy also posts things like this to public forums:

            It was 2001, maybe 2002. Somewhere in Hawai'i. Anyway, we were doing military training in civilian clothes. Intel, so no one was shooting at anyone, don't think of it like that. So, our command had cleared this with the security firm for the strip mall, but not with each individual store manager. So we corner an

        • Re:Shocked (Score:5, Insightful)

          by unformed (225214) on Thursday July 17, 2008 @02:42PM (#24232611)

          A number of reasons:

          1) I don't get spammed by email. I don't have to send everybody my new email when it gets changed.
          2) It's far, far, far easier to get in touch with people you've long fallen out of touch with.
          3) Adults are just as much social whores as kids are. We (as a race, excepting geeks) ARE a social creature, and we like talking and socializing with others, in whatever way possible.

        • I think you're missing the point of Facebook for some people (some adults at least). For me it isn't some social ladder, or a way to keep score. I won't argue that some people do that, however.

          I use it purely as a way to keep in contact with friends and family - especially those that live far away. I don't always have time to call (though I try), but I do like to see what they're up to, maybe send them a quick message.

          Sorry you see it that way. I'd say you're missing out, but it seems to me you've alrea

          • by ivan256 (17499)

            It seems to me that you're in the minority. Regardless there are plenty of technologies out there to allow you to keep in touch with friend and family over great distances without posting your personal life to the public on the internet, including sending quick messages.

        • by AndGodSed (968378)

          I'm constantly amazed about how people will post private information in a public place (thus making it public information), and then complain about how they are being robbed of their privacy.

          I have friends who have their cell-phone numbers posted on there...

        • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

          by shrykk (747039)

          Of course it also amazes me how popular these social networking sites are with adults. It's understandable that kids and teenagers want to climb a social ladder of sorts, since it is human nature to attempt to achieve more than your peers, and there is little available in the environments we provide to kids other than social hierarchy to climb... But when you grow up, generally people move on to trying to get ahead in other types of accomplishments. It seems things like MySpace and Facebook have extended Hi

          • Re:Shocked (Score:5, Insightful)

            by ivan256 (17499) on Thursday July 17, 2008 @03:21PM (#24233247)

            Your first paragraph describes the dream, and the second describes the reality.

            My comment simply offered a possible explanation as to why people see the dream instead of the reality.

            What is so fulfilling to you about performing your correspondence out in public over one of the many, more private and less exploited methods? I have yet to hear anybody answer that question with something that doesn't boil down to "everybody else is doing it". Hence the high school comment.

        • Re:Shocked (Score:4, Insightful)

          by syousef (465911) on Thursday July 17, 2008 @04:24PM (#24234149) Journal

          Of course it also amazes me how popular these social networking sites are with adults.

          It doesn't amaze me at all. When your work means you're out of the house 9-12 hrs/day 5-6 days a week (and that's considered good hours in IT), then you come home to chores etc. when do you find the time to catch up with old high school friends? My experience has been that I've become more and more isolated as I've gone from my mid teens to my mid 30s and my spare time has decreased. I have more acquaintances than close friends that i hang with. My social time's spent mostly with family. Still, if I do get spare time and it's not at the same time as my friends, I can write them an email. Sure I could keep track of everyone using simple email, but it's nice to see pictures of what people I haven't had time to catch up with in person for a long time are up to.

          What I don't understand is all the crappy games on facebook. You've been bitten by a vampire? What swearword are you? Someone's given you a freaking virtual fish? Who cares? The novelty of that wore off in 5 minutes. THAT is the side I see as childish.

      • Re:Shocked (Score:5, Interesting)

        by Firehed (942385) on Thursday July 17, 2008 @02:24PM (#24232309) Homepage

        I was damn glad that I did, because my BOSS at my uni went on looked at my facebook account before he hired me

        This, good sir, is why you set privacy controls.

        You're right about their data-mining though; Facebook's ads are really starting to concern me. "Single geek age 20? Visit eHarmony today!" Obviously my relationship status and age are right there in my profile, but them dynamically generating personality keywords based off of my interests and then proving them to advertisers... yeah, I should probably leave Facebook too.

        • by Gewalt (1200451)
          So you're upset because facebook *didn't* share your profile info with third party advertisers...

          ....ok....
        • I just recently noticed how targeted some of the ads can get. I get dating ads mentioning my university, and some about hobbies (photography in particular). The other day I was looking over my brothers shoulder when he was on facebook, and he had ads from christian dating services all over his.

          I found that hilarious

      • by Otto (17870)

        If my boss didn't want me to go out drinking, then I'd find a new boss.

      • Re:Shocked (Score:5, Insightful)

        by SatanicPuppy (611928) * <Satanicpuppy@@@gmail...com> on Thursday July 17, 2008 @02:32PM (#24232441) Journal

        All you whippersnappers, I swear...Look me up by my real name, and you get nothing, nada, nihil, zip, because I made a very conscious decision to separate my online identity from my regular identity. Keeps me from having to be too careful.

        Make the decision, and separate yourself from your online identity. You can always claim it later if you want to, but you can disclaim it as well

        • Re:Shocked (Score:5, Insightful)

          by xaxa (988988) on Thursday July 17, 2008 @02:45PM (#24232655)

          All you whippersnappers, I swear...Look me up by my real name, and you get nothing, nada, nihil, zip, because I made a very conscious decision to separate my online identity from my regular identity.

          That won't help when someone else tags a photo (or whatever) with your real name.

          • Re:Shocked (Score:5, Funny)

            by SleepyHappyDoc (813919) on Thursday July 17, 2008 @02:54PM (#24232829)

            There's a way around that. Kill your entire family, move to a different country, and insist all your new friends call you by your internet name.

          • All you whippersnappers, I swear...Look me up by my real name, and you get nothing, nada, nihil, zip, because I made a very conscious decision to separate my online identity from my regular identity.

            That won't help when someone else tags a photo (or whatever) with your real name.

            And that is why I'm changing my real name to John Smith, making me a needle in a haystack. That and the Groucho glasses.

      • by MagdJTK (1275470)

        I too disabled my account several months ago, not because of the security issues (I was careful about what I put on there) but because the site has become a mismanaged mess over a period of about two years.

        When I started uni in Oct 2005 (and remember it was only for uni people then), it was a really nice site. You had your own little page which you personalised with a picture and a few little details. People could post on your page and you could do the same to theirs. Even the pointless pokes had a charm

    • Yeah...one thing that's been bothering me recently about Facebook is that the advertisements seem to have access to your personal data - even if it's set to not be public. I don't know if I just happened to never see these ads on there before, but I'm seeing them too much now.

      For instance, my birth year is not public, however when I log in I see ads conveniently advertising to my age, like "[my age] and Need Cash?". This is something that REALLY bothers me, because that is supposed to be hidden informa
  • Or at least your Facebook cookies. Problem solved.

    • by Debased Manc (1313649) on Thursday July 17, 2008 @02:16PM (#24232173)

      Not quite, your email address also gets used as a foreign key between Facebook and it's affiliates.

      Fry all your cookies, but if you share an email address between your Facebook account and someone else, say Amazon, they can connect the dots that way.

      Thankfully I didn't register my Facebook account with my Hotmail only-for-the-porn account. That could've made for some interesting advertising though...

    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by nimbius (983462)
      I've found its easier to reject all cookies and establish a list of trusted sites (banks, etc...) for whom you accept cookies. as an added level of protection in firefox, you can force these cookies to be "session only."
  • Built-in (Score:5, Funny)

    by von_rick (944421) on Thursday July 17, 2008 @01:57PM (#24231827) Homepage
    The title has a built-in "In Soviet Russia joke.
  • by Chris Burke (6130) on Thursday July 17, 2008 @01:59PM (#24231889) Homepage

    "Facebook is able to track the buying habits of its users on affiliated third-party sites even when they are logged out of their account or have opted out of its controversial 'Beacon' tracking service."

    I should have known there was a problem when I was signing up and saw this:

    [ ] Opt out of Beacon(tm) on-line tracking when logged into Facebook; opt in to Lighthouse(tm) on-line tracking when logged out of Facebook.

  • by jareth780 (176411) on Thursday July 17, 2008 @02:00PM (#24231901)

    This is an outrage! How DARE they try and sell me things! This is almost as infuriating as Vons/Safeway and their "club card", tracking my purchases to try and "Better serve me". Horsefeathers! The fact that the products I want are in stock at any given point is PROOF that they've been using my spending habits to PREDICT MY NEEDS, which goes against everything I believe in.

    When I say I want a free social networking site, it's not good enough that I not be billed directly for using it. The company hosting it must be desperately trying to sustain the bandwidth and CPU time for my constant page refreshes. At no point should they be even breaking even, let alone PROFITING from their service. Information wants to be free! Down with Big Brother! Doublethink! Free as in beer! ...What else... Oh! And my cell phone bill is too high!

    • Re:How Dare They (Score:5, Insightful)

      by plasmacutter (901737) on Thursday July 17, 2008 @02:09PM (#24232075)

      Way to one-sidedly misrepresent wholesale privacy violation as innocent altruism.

      Apparently the telecom domestic spying scandal has not reached your part of the world?

      In these times, companies have as much or more assets and power available to them than many of the world's nations, and allowing the wholesale gathering of information on individuals by private firms under the red herring of "private property" will lead to the exact same kind of oppression as allowing the government to do it under the red herring of "national security".

      There are other ways to better serve me without having to identify me personally. Inventory tracking has been done successfully at the branch level for a century in its current form, and if they don't carry something, speaking to a manager will often get results.

      There is a difference between profiting from advertising, and profiteering from spying on me and selling that data to telemarketers, government agencies, and other shady organizations.

    • by Chris Burke (6130) on Thursday July 17, 2008 @02:21PM (#24232269) Homepage

      This is almost as infuriating as Vons/Safeway and their "club card", tracking my purchases to try and "Better serve me". Horsefeathers! The fact that the products I want are in stock at any given point is PROOF that they've been using my spending habits to PREDICT MY NEEDS, which goes against everything I believe in.

      That's clearly not true, because I've been to Safeway plenty of times and not ONCE have they offered me a blowjob.

    • Re:How Dare They (Score:5, Insightful)

      by novakyu (636495) <novakyu@member.fsf.org> on Thursday July 17, 2008 @02:36PM (#24232513) Homepage

      This is almost as infuriating as Vons/Safeway and their "club card", tracking my purchases to try and "Better serve me".

      Well, turning the sarcasm detector off, change that to "Vons/Safeway and their 'club card' tracking my purchases and all other purchases with the credit card that has ever been used with the club card through special deals with the credit card company ...." and you will be closer.

      Facebook is welcome to track you on their own website (practically every website owner does this with log analysis) and even track your outgoing clicks with redirects, hidden or bare (even Google does this, and they are really tricky about it too, if you've noticed it on their search results). What they are not welcome to do is track you when you are not on their website through "special deals" with other websites. Such aggregation of data on you is a disaster waiting to happen.

  • So the article (yes, I read it) only mentions 3 affliated sites. Does anyone have a list of all Facebook Affliated sites? While I don't use (and never will use) facebook, other family members do have facebook accounts. I don't consent to have my information sent - could this be a liability for Facebook should someone decide to make it a large issue?
  • orly? (Score:2, Funny)

    by Tekninja_Hawk (961855)
    Your friend has invited you to use the application "Big Brother", would you like to add this application?


    Would you like to be a Vampire/Pirate/Zombie instead?
    • Would you like to upload your contacts list, for your convenience?
    • A program needs your permission to continue.

      If you started this program, continue.

      Big Brother 1.0
      BigBrotherSoft Inc
      C:\Downloads\BigBrotherSetup.msi

      Continue / Cancel?

      User Account Control helps stop unauthorized changes to your computer.

  • Amazon.com does something similar with their website ads. I search and buy a lot at Amazon.com, and their ads on other web sites (I've noticed it at crooksandliars.com, at least) apparently read my cookies and display item suggestions that are the same or similar to items that I've searched for or purchased at Amazon.com. It doesn't matter if I've logged out of my Amazon.com account, closed and restarted my browser to clear out any active cookies, etc, the targeted advertisement results still come.

  • Unsubscribe (Score:5, Informative)

    by kellyb9 (954229) on Thursday July 17, 2008 @02:12PM (#24232125)
    I just wish I could delete my facebook account. It's actually close to impossible, first you have to delete all your information (wall posts, friends, etc.), and then they'll delete your account. Very, very time consuming. But I doubt any of that info is REALLY gone.
    • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

      by Anonymous Coward

      I just wish I could delete my facebook account. It's actually close to impossible, first you have to delete all your information (wall posts, friends, etc.), and then they'll delete your account. Very, very time consuming. But I doubt any of that info is REALLY gone.

      Its easier if you change all your informations into junk, then when someone looks you up on Facebook they retrieve a completely wrong information.
      I just suggest you don't upload information that would harm your future prospects for jobs and such.

    • by gclef (96311) on Thursday July 17, 2008 @02:42PM (#24232603)

      Change your profile picture to goatse...they should take card of the rest.

    • Re:Unsubscribe (Score:4, Informative)

      by Anonymous Coward on Thursday July 17, 2008 @02:54PM (#24232823)

      How to permanently delete your facebook account.
      http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=16929680703

      Go to this page:
      http://www.facebook.com/help/contact.php?show_form=delete_account

      Select the checkbox and click "Submit".

  • Dupe! (Score:5, Informative)

    by Thelasko (1196535) on Thursday July 17, 2008 @02:17PM (#24232197) Journal
    The CA article [ca.com] is the same one from 2007. Read the date at the bottom.

    Published Nov 29 2007, 11:39 PM by Stefan Berteau

    It was already posted on Slashdot. http://yro.slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=07/12/03/0656205 [slashdot.org] That's two dupes in a row guys! Care to go for three?

  • by sjames (1099) on Thursday July 17, 2008 @02:18PM (#24232213) Homepage

    Let's see, what do we call it when someone follows someone around to see where they go, their tastes, who they know, etc, etc.

    Yeah, that's right, it's STALKING!

    When you restrict those activities to the internet, it's cyber-stalking.

    Why is stalking suddenly OK if you're trying to sell stuff? It certainly doesn't feel any less creepy to the person being stalked.

    The fact that these things are done in secret and too often in spite of public denials tells me that they know at some level what they're doing is unwelcome and wrong.

    If they want to cyber-stalk in exchange for a free service, then it's not REALLY free, it just happens to have a non-monetary price. Let them be honest about the price and then the users can decide for themselves how acceptable the deal is.

  • If an online community is large enough, there will always be some huckster out there wanting to exploit the masses somehow. In this case, it sounds like consumer surveys administered for free, without consent and without knowledge. This is unethical on many levels.
  • Facebook Users have been very quiet of late. Where are the good old days of protest and people power? A year ago, a lot of teenagers with a strong sense of priorities and a social conscience would have fought Facebook to the death on this (rather than, you know, something trivial like Human Rights in China, or the UK). Where have you all gone, you Young Pioneers!

    Was it like this when the Germans bombed Pearl Harbor? No!

    Fight, the noble fight! Save Facebook for the rest of us! It's far too vital to ou
    • by Thelasko (1196535)

      A year ago, a lot of teenagers with a strong sense of priorities and a social conscience would have fought Facebook to the death on this

      You know why they aren't fighting Facebook right now? Because they already did and they won. TFA is from 2007.

  • Mark Zuckerberg (Score:5, Interesting)

    by NoPantsJim (1149003) on Thursday July 17, 2008 @02:33PM (#24232463) Homepage

    I've often thought about the various people who have made a fortune or are about to make a fortune from online properties.

    Jason Calacanis, Kevin Rose, the Flickr people, etc.

    Usually I think to myself, that's awesome that these people were able to work hard and see their vision to the end and make a living from it.

    When I think of Zuckerberg, I think the exact opposite. Fuck that guy. I've always felt like he sleezed his way to where he is, and stories like this only reinforce that opinion.

    (prepared to be modded troll...)

  • by TopSpin (753) *

    This morning I logged into a Gmail account that I use exclusively for certain Google alerts. The address has never been used otherwise. I found a bunch (20-30) of "new friend" notifications from Facebook.

    Turns out someone tried to create a Facebook account for my Gmail address (the account name isn't terribly obscure.) Of course, they couldn't 'verify' the Facebook account for lack of access to the Gmail account. Nevertheless Facebook dutifully listed this new account such that random bozos could befriend i

  • Old Article (Score:2, Insightful)

    by Silent Node (54344)

    The date on this article is 04 December 2007 05:22 PM, are we sure the concerns raised here weren't dealt with already? ...not that I'm a huge Facebook fan, but if I were to leave Facebook I would have to give up administration of the United Cabin Dwellers Federation. Although I hear leaving can be difficult...

  • ....when I thought about all the privacy risk potential for that oh-so-wonderful website known as facebook. I balked at the idea of using my real name on there. The site seems to be nearly useless if you have no friends who are already on the site. There's options for putting in your home address & phone number, and about 20 other things a website honestly doesn't to know about you.

    Now it's expansing. Makes me wonder why all the people who loved facebook yet hated myspace think so highly of this site. Y

  • by AftanGustur (7715) on Thursday July 17, 2008 @04:05PM (#24233965) Homepage

    In Soviet Russia .

    You watch Facebook ..

    Oh, wait ... WTF !!?!?

No user-servicable parts inside. Refer to qualified service personnel.

Working...