Follow Slashdot blog updates by subscribing to our blog RSS feed

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Transportation Earth Power

Chinese Automaker Unveils First Electric Car 341

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the jump-start-on-the-competition dept.
JuliusSu writes "A Chinese auto manufacturer, BYD, is introducing today the country's first electric car, a plug-in hybrid vehicle. It plans to sell at least 10,000 cars in 2009 for a price of less than $22,000. This put the company ahead of schedule against other entrants to this market, such as Toyota, due to release a similar car in late 2009; and GM, whose Chevy Volt will be launched in late 2010. The company is best known for making cellphone batteries, and hopes its expertise in ferrous battery technology will allow it to leapfrog established car manufacturers."
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

Chinese Automaker Unveils First Electric Car

Comments Filter:
  • quality (Score:5, Funny)

    by krakelohm (830589) on Monday December 15, 2008 @06:05PM (#26126129)
    This should be good, lol.
    • This should be good, lol.

      If we're lucky. If they can make an affordable, practical, electric car, more power to them, and if they really sell 10,000 next year, I guess we'll find out.

      • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

        If they can make an affordable, practical, electric car, more power to them, and if they really sell 10,000 next year, I guess we'll find out.

        Let's see. From the article, it'll cost $22000, have a range of 62 miles, and be available outside China in 2011.

        This doesn't look like it'll meet your expectations.

        • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

          by b0bby (201198)

          From the article, it'll cost $22000, have a range of 62 miles, and be available outside China in 2011.

          It's a plug in hybrid; the 62 mile range is on batteries alone, then the gas engine can kick in. It's a long way from being good with batteries to making a good car, though.

    • by EmbeddedJanitor (597831) on Monday December 15, 2008 @06:27PM (#26126413)
      That high quality American car is packed to the gunnels with Chinese made parts, including engines.

      About the only thing that is truely american is the arrogance.

      • by Anonymous Coward on Monday December 15, 2008 @06:43PM (#26126595)

        True, but don't underestimate the challenges involved in actually assembling a good-looking car that's safe and doesn't break.
        Remember the Yugo? Remember how Hyundai was (until recently, anyway)? Hell, (if you're old enough) remember how the Japanese cars once were?

        BYD has shown they know how to build laptop batteries. They may be able to scale it up to automobile level (although this is not trivial).
        However, they have years to go before they are capable of building automobiles that can compete on safety, comfort and reliability against existing auto makers. They may get there eventually, if they survive that long (Hyundai did, Yugo didn't); however, it's definitely not going to be with their first car. This has nothing to do with being Chinese, and everything to do with being new to market. I wouldn't trust Tesla's first car either, although charging $100K each may give Tesla an advantage in that it can afford to do more over-engineering and cherry-pick good parts than BYD can at its price segment.

      • by MukiMuki (692124) on Monday December 15, 2008 @06:47PM (#26126645)

        It's packed with Chinese-made parts that have to adhere to American safety regulations.

        Is this batch of 10,000 going to do the same?

        It's a serious question, btw. At $22k a pop this could very well be the case.

        • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

          by WindBourne (631190)
          Hmmm. American safety regulations that American car builders always obey. They would never knowingly design a car that had tanks that blew up, or SUVs that easily rolled, or bought tires that had highspeed blowouts. And they would stand behind them, right?
        • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

          by theaveng (1243528)

          Even the "good" Japanese companies have problems.

          About 5 years ago Toyota built an engine that died after only 30,000 miles due to overheating turning the oil to sludge. Initially Toyota blamed their customers but after the U.S. Consumer Protection Agency threatened to file a lawsuit, Toyota had a sudden change of heart and decided to honor the engine warranty.

          Honda had a problem with their early-model Insight having dead batteries. Again, Honda refused to fix the problem and blame the customer, but now

      • by Facegarden (967477) on Monday December 15, 2008 @06:49PM (#26126659)

        That high quality American car is packed to the gunnels with Chinese made parts, including engines.

        About the only thing that is truely american is the arrogance.

        Arrogance? You obviously don't know much about chinese cars. It doesn't matter where the parts are made, but american cars aren't ENGINEERED in china. So far all the chinese cars that have been engineered in china have been terrible. I remember one example that looked like any other common car in the US or elsewhere, but it did so poorly in crash testing it couldn't even manage ONE STAR. It was a deathtrap.

        Don't call people arrogant without checking your own ignorance. I'm not saying the car can't be good, but given what has come out of china so far, people have a right to be skeptical.
        -Taylor

      • by Sponge Bath (413667) on Monday December 15, 2008 @06:51PM (#26126673)

        About the only thing that is truely american is the arrogance.

        Best in class baby! USA! USA!
        ...whoops, the steering wheel on my Pontiac caught on fire. [*]

        [*] BTW, this actually happened to me on a 5 year old
        1986 Pontiac Grand Prix while I was driving it.
        I now drive a Toyota.

        • by mobby_6kl (668092)

          > ...whoops, the steering wheel on my Pontiac caught on fire. [*]
          >[*] BTW, this actually happened to me on a 5 year old
          >1986 Pontiac Grand Prix while I was driving it.

          Well that's quite an unfortunate incident. Have you ever figured out what caused it? Perhaps there's been a recall for this issue, like with the whole heated washer fluid fire thing.

          > I now drive a Toyota.

          Oh, I'm sorry.

      • by gr8_phk (621180) on Monday December 15, 2008 @07:11PM (#26126903)
        Actually no. There is a LOT of stuff in cars of all brands that is actually made in the U.S. There is also a lot made in other countries. But from what I've seen - working in Detroit for a long time - is that China is not the largest contributor of parts. Go ahead and argue that some Ford cars are assembled in Mexico, while some Toyotas are built in Alabama (not sure that's the right state) but China is not involved in the same way they are with toys for example. I know it's popular to bash Detroit, but this dumping on them with unfounded gibberish is really getting old. When there are 20+ vehicle manufacturers in the US, it's impressive that the 3 still hold as much market share as they do. Someone must be buying the vehicles.
        • Toyota trucks are made in San Antonio, TX.

          We were all excited when they came here. There were lines for miles for people applying.

          It was to be THE place to work.

      • by hb253 (764272)
        gunwales
      • by droopycom (470921)

        Thats why I have a "German" car .... full of Mexican made parts!

        Damn you Volkswagen!

      • by TheKidWho (705796)
        That is beyond ignorant, American cars are made with parts that are manufactured in North America, not China.

        Ford/GM/Chrysler engines are NOT made in China, but in the USA/Canada/Mexico. In fact very little is made in China.
        • GM announced back in August that they had a number of plants and China and like the PROFIT so much that they were going to move a great deal more work there. A lot is made there with more to come. That is why I say that any of the 3 that wants a loan or a break-up needs to move the jobs back here and need to be broken up. I am not wild about subsidizing these 3, but I hate paying to ship our jobs to country that does not play fair on the economic front. And while I believe that we do need to tweak NAFTA, I
      • Which is why I quit buying it. Not only is the quality lousy, but I hate the fact that China ties their Yuen to the Dollar. By 2004, they were suppose to have dropped their trade barriers and have untied their money. They created a "basket" that is a total joke and their barriers are still up as high as ever. China is now pushing to keep things like the way they are until 2020. They are also trying to do the same with EU. Between the low quality and horrible politics, I refuse to buy from a number of these
    • by LoRdTAW (99712)

      Yea I can picture it now!

      "BDY has recalled all 10,000 electric cars after a motorist was burned to death when his car battery exploded"

      • And the Corvair and Pinto were less of a death trap? Give them a couple of years of success and customer feedback (read "people who vote with their wallet") and may the better solution win.
        • by poetmatt (793785)

          Better yet,

          wait until (if it's successful) they make plants in the US, built exclusively in the US under a US subsidiary, but people complain that we're fueling china.

        • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

          by Dun Malg (230075)

          And the Corvair and Pinto were less of a death trap?

          The Pinto was a deathtrap, sure, but not the Corvair. Ralph Nader is a grandstanding dickhead who basically launched his career on false accusations and shoddy methodology in Unsafe at Any Speed. After a 2 year investigation, the NHTSA determined that there wasn't any problem at all with the Corvair. Despite what Ralph Nader thought the law should have been, the fact remains that there was not and is not a requirement that a car fail gracefully when negligently driven beyond its capabilities. GM changed the

    • by matrim99 (123693)

      No doubt. Don't lick the paint!

    • by Lonewolf666 (259450) on Monday December 15, 2008 @07:39PM (#26127149)

      When the first Japanese cars showed up in Europe in the 1970s, they were cheap but had a terrible reputation. That has changed. Today they are on the same quality level (and almost as expensive) as European cars. Toyota even ruled the reliability/breakdown statistics for years, only recently some European models have retaken the lead.

      I expect that the same will happen with the Chinese cars. They may have not much experience in car making now, but 10 years from now things can look different.

  • Vaporware. Woo Hoo Hoo.

  • by seanadams.com (463190) * on Monday December 15, 2008 @06:08PM (#26126167) Homepage

    This is a little OT but I figure someone here might know. With so many electric cars finally coming to market I thought it would be smart to plan ahead even if I'm not ready to take the leap yet...

    So, I'm in the process of a remodel and have an easy opportunity to install a high-amperage electric circuit to some location in the garage. Is there any emerging standard for charging electric cars that would dictate the ideal location to put the outlet? I.e. in front of the car, driver side, passenger side, what height from ground, etc. Also amperage, type of plug etc would be good to anticipate, although initially I'd just have an empty conduit running there from the load center.

    • by eln (21727) on Monday December 15, 2008 @06:21PM (#26126337) Homepage

      My understanding is that most (all?) of these plugin hybrids are being designed to fit a standard household electrical socket. I would think if you have a standard GFI outlet in your garage (and I think just about everyone does) you should be fine. Honestly, I don't see how these things would take off if they required rewiring your house just to be able to recharge them.

      • by ArsonSmith (13997) on Monday December 15, 2008 @06:32PM (#26126467) Journal

        Last I had heard they were tiered. Standard 110v was like 12 hour recharge, 220v (like water heater or dryer) was like 4 hour and a nonstandard 440v could do in 1-2 hours.

      • A standard outlet delivers at most enough power to run a vacuum cleaner. At that rate, you're going to be recharging for something on the order of one hour for each mile driven. Maybe they can charge from a regular outlet in case of emergency, but that would not be suitable for daily recharging.

        • A standard outlet delivers at most enough power to run a vacuum cleaner. At that rate, you're going to be recharging for something on the order of one hour for each mile driven. Maybe they can charge from a regular outlet in case of emergency, but that would not be suitable for daily recharging.

          Most of the world runs on 220-250V. I think the US made a bad guess with 110V. It is too expensive to deliver high current at low voltage.

          • by Dun Malg (230075)

            Most of the world runs on 220-250V. I think the US made a bad guess with 110V. It is too expensive to deliver high current at low voltage.

            Not a bad guess but a conscious choice. Split-phase systems like we have in the US allow for a self-balancing load to a neutral return split between two lower voltage conductors. The lower voltage also results in a less dangerous ground-fault than 220V single-wire systems when used for small appliances while still providing 220V (if needed) by attaching a load between the two phases directly.

            So really, the US chose safety and flexibility at the cost of requiring more copper, rather than going with the mor

        • by rubycodez (864176)

          a 20 amp outlet at 120V is capable of putting out over 3 horsepower. So in ten hours could put out the power to run fully loaded 30 horsepower motor one hour.

        • ...but that would not be suitable for daily recharging.

          Surely that depends entirely upon how far you drive and how much time you spend at a place with a socket each day. For some people, the specs of the Tesla would be more than enough. It also depends on if you have another vehicle to use, and if you want to use it to go on long trips in etc.

      • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

        by Anonymous Coward

        Yeah, just like Top Gear's review of the Tesla yesterday.

        Brilliant.

        What, 14 hours to recharge? 55 mile range (instead of the advertised 200+).

        Then they looked at Honda's hydrogen/electric car and decided that was the future. Not home-charged electric vehicles that can't recharge in under half a day. You certainly need something a lot better than 13A @ 230V - maybe a 200A circuit would help things. 400A in 110V countries ...

        • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

          55 mile range (instead of the advertised 200+).

          I think you will find the 200 mile range, like every other range spec, is dependent on your driving style. Thrashing any car, petrol or electric, consumes much more than when driving normally. Tesla were not being deceiving at all, from what I've read.

    • by djupedal (584558)
      Front connectivity seems most common to me (businesses, parking stalls, charging stations). Your choice to have it come in from the left, right or center.
    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      Do what they do for gasoline pumps - put it up high on one side, and get a long enough cord to connect it. If you want maximum flexibility, why not connect it to the ceiling above the center of the car (maybe with a small boom to assist with cable management)? That will keep it out of your way while walking around the vehicle, yet still make it visually obvious whenever it is plugged in.

    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward

      If possible, run two.... one near where drivers side fuel door would be and one where passengers side would be.... or in a 2 car garage that has a post in the center, run it to the post... then you can do drivers side of the righthand stall and passengers side of the lefthand stall.

      I would run 50 amp 220 and 50 amp 110.

      Worst case, if you're wrong, at least you'll have power there that you could use to plug in an emergency backup generator, etc.. and shut off the main breaker, and backfeed from your high amp

    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by Trahloc (842734)
      My vote would if you can, bring 480v 3-phase into the garage, plop down a small transformer, and then you can use 240v, 208v, 120v, all at the same time if you need to. Whatever power options win out you'll be set to take advantage of. Just leave some space for whatever primary charging standard wins out, but in the mean time you can have him install ALL the current standard XXXv 20/30amp sockets.
  • Bye, bye GM :) (Score:5, Insightful)

    by djupedal (584558) on Monday December 15, 2008 @06:13PM (#26126239)
    Detroit wasn't interested...someone had to get on with it.

    GM killed electric trolley public transportation on the East Coast decades ago, pushing for city buses made by GMC that used internal combustion. The VOLT was promoted using jazzy images of impressive body lines that promoted interest, only to release a breadbox as the final design. GM doesn't want the VOLT to succeed, and now with their imminent demise, they may get their wish.

    BYD will be in NA in short time, and more like them will follow. I wish them best of luck.
    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by Anonymous Coward

      [The VOLT was promoted using jazzy images of impressive body lines that promoted interest, only to release a breadbox as the final design. GM doesn't want the VOLT to succeed...]
      Here we go again...

      The original design was so un-aerodynamic that Bob Lutz said it was almost better if they put the car in the wind tunnel backward. That's why it was changed.

    • ...The VOLT was promoted using jazzy images of impressive body lines that promoted interest, only to release a breadbox as the final design. GM doesn't want the VOLT to succeed...

      I believe you.

      General Motors is very competent in the area of marketing memes. They know exactly what impression a name will have on the buying public. The very name VOLT in upper case invokes the image of a brush against an electrified fence, not a family-friendly econo people carrier.

      This is a bit more subtle, however, than there previous attempt at not selling a car the public demands -- the Chevy Impact. As me friends might say, "subtle as a 'frown brick".

    • by Cyberax (705495)

      Nope. GM gambled pretty much everything on Volt's success: http://gm-volt.com/2008/12/15/gm-plans-to-build-a-strong-hybrid-small-vehicle-but-will-spend-twice-as-much-developing-e-flex-cars/ [gm-volt.com]

      E-Flex cars are now their top priority in funding. Also, IMO the 'generic' design for Volts is a plus. GM tells us Volts are not going to be exotic items, but rather a good old boring automobile which will JustWork(tm).

      Also, I don't expect much success with the first models. They are probably going to explode/burn/crash t

    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by dunkelfalke (91624)

      the volt was originally developed in germany by opel anyway.

  • A hybrid or an electric? GM, Honda, and Toyota hav all produced hybrids. Tesla produces an impressive electric car. What is new here except that *this* Chinese manufacturer is producing *this* car?
    • by Abreu (173023)

      Price

    • Re:Which is it? (Score:4, Informative)

      by JamesTRexx (675890) <m.nystrom@mbi[ ]nl ['tz.' in gap]> on Monday December 15, 2008 @06:47PM (#26126643) Homepage Journal
      It is hybrid, it has a backup gasoline engine.
      It's not really new, but it's better than all electric like the Tesla. It may be fast, but as it has been shown in the latest episode of Top Gear, it has a major drawback, recharging time.
      Seeing the hydrogen-powered Honda FCX Clarity in that same episode showed how it can be done practically. Fill up like a gasoline car, be done in two minutes and drive on.
      For those that haven't seen it, info and torrent link here [finalgear.com].
    • you'll see that it's the first hybrid to be produced in the PRC.

    • AFAIK it is the first hybrid car using lithium iron-phosphate batteries. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BYD_F3DM [wikipedia.org].

      This may help them on price/performance, because the raw materials for the batteries are relatively cheap. It is also a good real life test of large batteries of this type. The reliability statistics for this car should give us a good idea of how rugged the new battery tech really is.

  • All you have to do is make the back wheels bigger than the front and you are always going down hill. This should improve mileage by quite a bit but be careful, if the size ratio gets too big it is almost impossible to stop.

  • Warning (Score:3, Funny)

    by diablovision (83618) on Monday December 15, 2008 @06:41PM (#26126577)

    I drove one of these but two hours later I felt hungry again and had to drive it some more.

  • I RTFA, no images, uhmmmmm, I see. I hope that BYD can make the car to California specifications so that a down trodden masses like myself could buy one, AND drive it to work. This combined with a Solar Cell Roof could save me some large coin.

  • by SethJohnson (112166) on Monday December 15, 2008 @06:54PM (#26126713) Homepage Journal


    A big challenge to any new player getting into the electro-auto market is dealer support. Where is someone supposed to get parts for this thing or a Tesla? Sure, an electric vehicle design should require less maintenance, but even components will need to be replaced due to accidents and road wear.

    I've heard people say the auto bailout money should go to a start-up like Tesla. The problem with completely abandoning the American automakers and putting public funds behind a startup is that the big three already have huge infrastructure in place. They already understand production. Bless the hearts of those Tesla idealists, but they're going to spend a BUNCH of money developing dealerships, parts distribution, training mechanics & sales people. And until their production numbers get big, the deals they'll cut with suppliers won't be as profitable as the ones Ford/GM/Chrysler make with their suppliers thanks to the economies of scale they're working in.

    I'm not saying there isn't a place for smaller companies to come in and fill a niche demand. But now isn't the time to abandon the American auto companies and watch them perish. If that happens, Toyota, Honda, and Hyundai will assist in a huge transfer of wealth overseas.

    Seth
    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by haruchai (17472)

      What's so hard about supporting an electric car?
      Changing wires? Replacing batteries? How about we make the Big Three assist the nimbler domestic startups.
      They've shown that their size has been a liability when it comes to change.
      If they want public funds, they should be serving the best interests of the public - and, increasingly that means GOING green, not play-acting green.

      • by AgentPaper (968688) * on Monday December 15, 2008 @08:31PM (#26127601)

        What's so hard about supporting an electric car?

        Quite a bit, if you think about it:

        1) Educating and qualifying mechanics to work on the car. Your average Joe at the gas station isn't going to be able to service this thing right off the bat, nor will he be able to open the hood and figure it out after a few minutes' inspection. At least for the first two or three years this car is on the market, you'll be forced to rely on dealer service, simply because there won't be trained mechanics anywhere else. And if you break down someplace where there isn't a dealer handy, you're hosed. A hobbyist owner might be able to repair the car, to a greater or lesser extent, but those repairs might void the warranty, or in some states may disqualify the car from street service entirely.

        2) Availability of parts. There is lots and lots more that goes into an electric car, or indeed any car, besides a few hundred feet of wire, an electric motor and a few batteries. If your alternator dies, if you have to replace a transmission or some other drivetrain component, if your windshield cracks, all of those require many more parts to complete beyond the obvious part that's malfunctioning. The problem is compounded if you have multiple systems damaged at once, as in the context of an accident. You'll have to have some mechanism in place to get those parts from their Chinese manufacturers to a U.S. dealer service department, quickly and efficiently. (This is harder than it sounds; as a personal example, I can confirm that for a certain well-known German luxury manufacturer, a replacement front bumper fascia took three weeks to ship from Stuttgart, where replacing the same part on an American vehicle took two days.)

        On a related note, you also have to worry about the general lack of infrastructure. Right or wrong, as it stands right now the entire transportation infrastructure in the US is set up to deal with internal combustion vehicles. Changing over to an electric infrastructure is going to take time, at least two or three years and probably more like five or seven, during which time the drivers of electric vehicles are going to be at a major disadvantage. You won't be able to charge most places, won't be able to get service most places, might not be able to drive on freeways or other limited access roads (at least here, freeways are restricted to internal combustion vehicles with engines greater than 125 CC displacement, which can't be powered farm equipment, and must be able to maintain a minimum speed of 55 MPH). Those restrictions might be enough to put people off electrics entirely, or at the very least slow their adoption. It'd be a damned shame if that happened, but it's a very real risk. In the meanwhile, everyone who bought these electric cars will be in the lurch, and if the manufacturer folds, the vehicles will be little more than hobby pieces.

        • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

          by DrFalkyn (102068)

          What's so hard about supporting an electric car?

          Quite a bit, if you think about it:

          1) Educating and qualifying mechanics to work on the car. Your average Joe at the gas station isn't going to be able to service this thing right off the bat, nor will he be able to open the hood and figure it out after a few minutes' inspection. At least for the first two or three years this car is on the market, you'll be forced to rely on dealer service, simply because there won't be trained mechanics anywhere else. And if you break down someplace where there isn't a dealer handy, you're hosed.

          EVs are primarily going to be used for commuting, so I imagine most people aren't going to be that far from the dealer where they bought the car.

          2) Availability of parts. There is lots and lots more that goes into an electric car, or indeed any car, besides a few hundred feet of wire, an electric motor and a few batteries. If your alternator dies, if you have to replace a transmission or some other drivetrain component, if your windshield cracks, all of those require many more parts to complete beyond the obvious part that's malfunctioning. The problem is compounded if you have multiple systems damaged at once, as in the context of an accident. You'll have to have some mechanism in place to get those parts from their Chinese manufacturers to a U.S. dealer service department, quickly and efficiently. (This is harder than it sounds; as a personal example, I can confirm that for a certain well-known German luxury manufacturer, a replacement front bumper fascia took three weeks to ship from Stuttgart, where replacing the same part on an American vehicle took two days.)

          Yet people still buy Germany luxury cars, despite this problem.

          On a related note, you also have to worry about the general lack of infrastructure. Right or wrong, as it stands right now the entire transportation infrastructure in the US is set up to deal with internal combustion vehicles. Changing over to an electric infrastructure is going to take time, at least two or three years and probably more like five or seven, during which time the drivers of electric vehicles are going to be at a major disadvantage. You won't be able to charge most places, won't be able to get service most places, might not be able to drive on freeways or other limited access roads (at least here, freeways are restricted to internal combustion vehicles with engines greater than 125 CC displacement, which can't be powered farm equipment, and must be able to maintain a minimum speed of 55 MPH). Those restrictions might be enough to put people off electrics entirely, or at the very least slow their adoption. It'd be a damned shame if that happened, but it's a very real risk. In the meanwhile, everyone who bought these electric cars will be in the lurch, and if the manufacturer folds, the vehicles will be little more than hobby pieces.

          Like I said before, people are using their cars 99% for commuting, most likely with 50 miles from their home, round trip. You recharge at home at night. No need to build charging stations or anything like that. Even if they were - the infrastructure is already there. Every where you can find a gas st

    • You're right. I'd love a Tesla, but spending over $100K on a small 2-seater with limited range and no gas backup is not an option for me. Nor is it for most people. It's basically a semi hand-built car with all of the non-electric/electronic engineering done by Lotus. (It's 90% an Elise).

      So yeah, they don't know shit about car engineering, let alone volume production.

      Still want want though...

      As for the Chinese car, good luck with the crash test.

  • economies (Score:2, Interesting)

    by thephydes (727739)
    It seems to me that this highlights the difference between an economy based on greed - "It's OK, we can continue to stifle innovation and rake in the profits", to one based on need - "We have the largest population and a fast growing economy (and associated emissions pollution), how do we meet both those challenges AND make a profit on the way?"
  • The US "secret trade weapon": safety and emission standards. Its coming: they learn quickly.
  • by haruchai (17472) on Monday December 15, 2008 @07:12PM (#26126905)

    I have yet to see a serious, insightful post about this story. A little googling turned up pics and data although I confess that I don't know what
    16 kwh / 100 KM works out to in MPG.

    The pictures I saw of the car look pretty nice. Congrats to the Chinese - if this turns out to be a quality vehicle, it may force the Big Three stragglers to dump some of their guzzlers and give
    us clean, efficient vehicles we can depend on

    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by DanielG42 (906032)
      Wikipedia quotes 1 gallon of gasoline at 33.7kwh.

      That puts this car at about 124 mpg.

    • by Mashiki (184564)

      Does it kill you in a 40mph crash like the rest of the Chinese made cars do?

A computer lets you make more mistakes faster than any other invention, with the possible exceptions of handguns and Tequilla. -- Mitch Ratcliffe

Working...