Become a fan of Slashdot on Facebook

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
KDE GUI Operating Systems Software Windows

Is It Windows 7, Or KDE 4? 559

Posted by timothy
from the spy-vs.-spy dept.
An anonymous reader writes "Is it Windows 7 or KDE 4? In this video, ZDNet takes to Sydney's streets to find out what people think of what they think is a Windows 7 demonstration. The results are surprising." Or maybe they're not surprising at all.
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

Is It Windows 7, Or KDE 4?

Comments Filter:
  • by Anonymous Coward on Friday February 06, 2009 @08:29AM (#26750727)
    9/10 people polled also couldn't tell the difference between rabbit shit and deer shit.
    • Re:not surprising (Score:5, Insightful)

      by Chrisq (894406) on Friday February 06, 2009 @08:35AM (#26750779)

      9/10 people polled also couldn't tell the difference between rabbit shit and deer shit.

      And nine out of ten couldn't tell the difference between your statistics and bullshit.

      That said it is a useful comparison.

      Someone who is just walking in the woods probably cannot tell rabbit shit from deer shit. A tracker or someone dependent on hunting for food certainly will.

      Someone who just needs to run a browser and word processor probably can't tell Windows 7 from KDE. Someone who needs to configure and administrate systems for an organisation certainly will.

      • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

        by Anonymous Coward

        9/10 people polled also couldn't tell the difference between rabbit shit and deer shit.

        And nine out of ten couldn't tell the difference between your statistics and bullshit.

        That said it is a useful comparison.

        Someone who is just walking in the woods probably cannot tell rabbit shit from deer shit. A tracker or someone dependent on hunting for food certainly will.

        Someone who just needs to run a browser and word processor probably can't tell Windows 7 from KDE. Someone who needs to configure and administrate systems for an organisation certainly will.

        Also 9/10 enjoys group rapes

      • Re:not surprising (Score:5, Interesting)

        by SolitaryMan (538416) on Friday February 06, 2009 @08:57AM (#26750963) Homepage Journal

        Someone who just needs to run a browser and word processor probably can't tell Windows 7 from KDE. Someone who needs to configure and administrate systems for an organisation certainly will.

        True.

        I actually had a long argument with my SO about Linux vs. Windows issue. My main point was this: whenever she experiences any trouble she still complains to me, and for me it is much easier to deal with Linux. So she gave it a try and it all went OK to her own surprise, she had no troubles using FF, Gimp and Pidgin.

        • by Tiber (613512) <josh.knarr@gmail.com> on Friday February 06, 2009 @09:13AM (#26751109) Homepage

          I have the opposite problem. My wife won't touch linux but still wants to use my PC.

          Then she gripes that it doesn't "automatically log in" or gives me the "we should share passwords".

          I say to her, "Do you know shit about Linux?" "no" "THEN YOU DON'T NEED MY PASSWORD FOR SHIT".

        • by Hatta (162192) on Friday February 06, 2009 @10:19AM (#26752155) Journal

          This is why I have no problem with my GF running windows. If it breaks, I don't know what to do with it anyway, so it's not my problem.

      • Re:not surprising (Score:5, Informative)

        by gutnor (872759) on Friday February 06, 2009 @09:25AM (#26751257)

        I'm sure that most people will see the difference when trying to install a game, sync their PDA (with the instruction on their constructor webpage not matching what they see on their screen) or try to open the crappy humor Powerpoint filling their mailboxes. No need to be a admin to see a subtle difference between linux and windows if you don't have a diligent kid/friend that take care of every single installation problem for you.

        This video reminds me of all those "infomercial" showing the latest innovation in carpet cleaning or kitchen robot ...

      • by Creepy (93888) on Friday February 06, 2009 @10:08AM (#26751907) Journal

        And nine out of ten couldn't tell the difference between your statistics and bullshit.

        that's because 9 out of 10 statistics are made up 73% of the time.

      • by JCSoRocks (1142053) on Friday February 06, 2009 @10:56AM (#26752873)
        Apparently 1/10 enjoys studying fecal matter.
      • by dwarg (1352059) on Friday February 06, 2009 @12:02PM (#26754135)

        Bucking for some informative karma I've tracked down some visual aids for our comparison:

        Windows 7 [redbubble.net]

        KDE 4 [photobucket.com]

        Your welcome.

    • by gestalt_n_pepper (991155) on Friday February 06, 2009 @09:49AM (#26751531)
      9 out of 10 people polled couldn't tell the difference between 9 and 10.
  • by hal2814 (725639) on Friday February 06, 2009 @08:30AM (#26750733)

    I'll admit I fell for it. But in my defense, they showed it to me in the morning and I was really tired that morning for some reason. It's like someone switched out my usual high quality Columbian coffee with Folgers or something that day.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Friday February 06, 2009 @08:30AM (#26750735)

    I mean; even the editors themselves state that there isn't any conclusion to be drawn here; "we've learned nothing" because there simply are too many factors to consider. People don't know Windows 7 or people don't know KDE. Or people don't really care at all. So; fun movie, move along.

  • by jellomizer (103300) on Friday February 06, 2009 @08:31AM (#26750745)

    Any OS can look impressive when you find a demo that shows off all the eye candy to its full extent. You could have shown these people DWM configured nicely they would think it would be the next generation OS, UI. Vista got good visual reviews too. The problem is when you start working with it, things change. KDE and GNOME while have a rather niced polished UI, you still need to do things the Unix/Linux way. The same with windows no matter what you do to the UI it is still windows and need to work with it.

    What I find really funny comparing Windows/Gnome/KDE with a Mac. The Mac actually has a lot less eye candy, yet perception has it as having more.

  • Folgers... (Score:5, Funny)

    by Sabathius (566108) on Friday February 06, 2009 @08:31AM (#26750749)
    We've secretly replaced Your coffee with Fogers Crystals! [ebaumsworld.com]
  • by VolkerLanz (1005127) on Friday February 06, 2009 @08:32AM (#26750751) Homepage
    We did in fact not learn all that much from their little street intreviews. Apart from that people feel uncomfortable with Vista (what did that lady say -- "hard to get user-friendly with"?) we learnt that they seem to like the default looks of KDE 4. That's interesting, but not all that surprising.
    Still a nice little laugh, that video.
    • Totally agree with you - although at the end the ZDnet video they said 'they learnt nothing', that's not quite correct. They learnt that nobody in their (presumably not very scientific sample) has any idea of what KDE4 looks like...

      So, as you imply, should be on 'idle' really...

    • by NightFears (869799) on Friday February 06, 2009 @09:00AM (#26750995)
      I think their point is that neither can any conclusions be drawn from Microsoft's spoofed Windows 7 interviews. People are willing to accept anything from an authoritative label. But that is not news, either.
    • by Excelsior (164338) on Friday February 06, 2009 @09:23AM (#26751219)

      I think I learned quite a bit. I learned that when you get people in front of a camera talking about your product, they don't really pay very much attention to what they are seeing. If you look like a representative of the company, most people are going to say kind things.

      Which to me, says an awful lot about the Mojave Experiment. It doesn't really matter what people say they think in that setting. It matters what they think when they install the OS on their own computer, and for Vista that hasn't been very good.

      It also makes me question the effectiveness of usability labs I've sat through in the process of developing software for corporations. It's a painful process, and now I wonder if it is very accurate at all.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    It's very misleading, people could have pretended any OS or GUI, including MacOS-X - because the 1-2 min demonstration saying "look how easy it is" could have been a Vista desktop with a different background image, and people would be alike fooled. So the laugh was good, but it just shows how misleading suggestive presentations are, and what people truly value: easy to use, and they believe it (first) when you tell them, and get pissed (later) when it's not so as told (like in case of Vista).

  • by Viol8 (599362) on Friday February 06, 2009 @08:37AM (#26750789)

    This isn't a troll - I installed it with Suse 11.0 last year and though it was supposedly a release version it was utterly unusable, unstable and missing important features. I had to install 3.5.4 to actually get some work done. Since then I haven't bothered to check what state 4 is in now as I felt the KDE team (and Suse) had, to be polite, been rather dishonest about it. Is it worthwhile looking at it yet or should I just stick to 3.5 for the forseable future.

    • by Anonymous Coward on Friday February 06, 2009 @08:41AM (#26750819)

      Yeah, 4.2 is far, far better than 4. I use it and love it!

      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by NotBorg (829820) *

        The question is: Is KDE 4.2 better than 3.5.x?

        I've found that 4.2
        * looks nice,
        * is slow to draw things on the screen,
        * still has fewer things working than its 3.5.x predecessor.

        Although I found that I could alleviate most of the slow screen painting using desktop effects with KWin's composition manager. However, like all the other broken composition managers out there, you get a nice desktop that can't run 3D applications.

        Lure them in with spinning cubes and wobbly windows and then break their hearts by te

        • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

          by caseih (160668)

          However, like all the other broken composition managers out there, you get a nice desktop that can't run 3D applications.

          I run X-plane all the time under Gnome and compiz-fusion. It's almost as fast as without compiz running (indirect rendering does take a hit), and it still gets a very reasonable frame rate. Maybe Kwin's compositor prevents #D apps, but in general composite managers should not and do not. Now I do prefer to turn off the effects when I do run a game. But yes, 3D apps certainly do work u

    • by the_womble (580291) on Friday February 06, 2009 @09:01AM (#26751009) Homepage Journal

      I blame the distro. They should not have made KDE4 the default so early - they should have stuck with KDE 3 until at least 4.2.

      AS far as I can remember KDE 4.0 was well know not to be really ready.

    • KDE4 user (Score:5, Informative)

      by DrYak (748999) on Friday February 06, 2009 @09:12AM (#26751101) Homepage

      I've been using KDE4 since openSUSE started including the previews.

      I felt the KDE team (and Suse) had, to be polite, been rather dishonest about it.

      I don't know but to me it always seemed clear that the 4.0 was more a "early tester" release.

      By now KDE4.2 is starting to get really usable and really configurable and could be used by more casual users.

      Sure, if you have tons finely tuned stuff in KDE3.5, you'll really miss them.

      But KDE4.2 offers enough basic functionality to be usable by most people.

      Is it worthwhile looking at it yet or should I just stick to 3.5 for the forseable future.

      If you don't depend on highly specific KDE3.5 customisations,
      or if you're ready to spend time re-tuning everything again in a slightly different way,
      then KDE4.2 is definitely worth giving a try.

      On the other hand if you absolutely require the same level of ultra smooth-polished user experience that KDE3.5 offers, you'd better stick with the KDE3.x branch for now and probably wait until somewhere around the KDE4.5 version. (maybe just giving quick shot to KDE4.3 and 4.4 just to watch progress).

      Ditto for KDE5.x in a couple of years : stay with KDE4.5 until that one matures. ;-)

  • by gzipped_tar (1151931) on Friday February 06, 2009 @08:38AM (#26750803) Journal

    It is indeed surprising AND unsurprising.

    The video ends with the two guys discussing "what have we learned today". FTFV:

    -- Are you saying that we learned nothing?
    -- Nothing.

  • by reallocate (142797) on Friday February 06, 2009 @08:41AM (#26750831)

    If you can't distinguish KDE from Windows, and vice versa, that's reason enough to avoid both.

  • "I use Windows iMac" (Score:5, Informative)

    by WD (96061) on Friday February 06, 2009 @08:42AM (#26750839)

    So what does this experiment show? That people just aren't computer savvy.

  • What does it show? (Score:4, Interesting)

    by mlwmohawk (801821) on Friday February 06, 2009 @08:56AM (#26750953)

    Anyone staging a demo can find a number of people to say oooh ahhhh.

    Seriously. This is the problems with computers today. The perception of "usability" is not actual "usability."

    We all know, at the end of the day, "usability" is how easy it is to accomplish one or more tasks, to a certain degree the ease at which you learn how to do these tasks, and lastly the predictability and reliability of accomplishing your tasks.

    So, if something is easy to do, easy to learn, and rewards careful execution with consistent outcome, the thing is easy to use.

    Now, where does flashy eye candy come in to that picture? It doesn't. That's why military vehicles are all drab colors. The criteria is utility not beauty.

    Sure, I do *like* the way KDE 4 looks, but it is less usable than KDE 3.
     

  • by yoshi_mon (172895) on Friday February 06, 2009 @08:59AM (#26750977)

    Apps and games baby...Uhh, uh-huh, yeah.

    Seriously thou, the rub comes in with what the Win32/64 platform can run more than anything else these days. Both Mac and GNU desktops are plenty mature enough to deal with what most normal users would want. The main thing is now the sheer force of inertia that the Windows platform has in terms of what it runs natively.

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by jellomizer (103300)

      Oddly enough the same group of people who want more Applications for Linux, are also so dead against Web Applications and Cloud Computing, which in essence gives apps to these platforms. Really other then Games, CAD or High Performance Apps. A Well Designed web app can do the job, and work on Linux, Mac, Windows, BSD, Solaris... As most applications are based on Text Input some calculations Text or simple graphic output, Web Based apps are a good choice.

  • But no punchline... (Score:5, Interesting)

    by markdavis (642305) on Friday February 06, 2009 @09:00AM (#26750983)

    At the end, they should have said:

    "Have you ever heard of Linux?"
    "What have you heard?"
    "What you say if I told you this was Linux and not MS-Windows?"

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by ionix5891 (1228718)

      linux mojave TM

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by sznupi (719324)

      And sad thing is...I can bet that in 2 years or so many MS-fanbots will point to KDE4 while saying "see? Linux doesn't innovate, it just rips off Windows!"...

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by markdavis (642305)
        So true. It won't matter that people had been using Compiz (and similar) under Linux before MS-Vista even existed, much less MS-Windows-7.
  • by argent (18001) <[moc.agnorat.6002.todhsals] [ta] [retep]> on Friday February 06, 2009 @09:00AM (#26750985) Homepage Journal

    I started the video, and it stuttered, and started over... with an actual demonstration of Windows 7. I had to reload the page to get the KDE4 prank video.

    Was that supposed to be some kind of Zen test?

  • by Teun (17872) on Friday February 06, 2009 @09:06AM (#26751037) Homepage
    This is more or less what I'm since a few years experiencing when someone needs to use my computer, I just point out the usual applications and nearly always they will get their thing done without any further issues.

    Explaining tabs in the browser is harder, the vast majority will still shut down the browser instead of just the tab they were in.

    Although KDE4.2 is showing great promises it's all but ready for full roll out.
    But I sure like the way they are moving, it's nice to look at and the way they are splitting configurations like through widgets is in my view nice if only because it's optional.

    But even in this demo we can see one of the issues, while rolling through the windows you notice how a video window is momentarily loosing like what seems sinc.

    Now once it'll get snappy like KDE3.5 and robust as the OS underneath...

  • by Dracos (107777) on Friday February 06, 2009 @09:11AM (#26751091)

    Exercises like this might be fun, but they have no practical purpose.

    Linux desktops aren't marketed, they are judged by their users based on useful metrics: configuration options, stability, tools, etc.

    In Windows world, 95, XP, and Vista were all marketed to the public primarily by showing static screens illustrating how pretty they were. Windows' classic interface looks bland today, but it was hip in the 90's. XP's fisher price interface was a hackish step further. Aero is a half-hearted catchup maneuver to Linux and OSX, delivered in a business-minded blandness that only Microsoft thinks is "innovative". Each of those versions were marketed the same, but received differently based on almost everything except their appearance. No one has ever said UAC prompts are pretty, they're too busy being annoyed by them.

    Which desktop is more visually attractive has little to do with how much can be done with it, and how efficiently.

A computer lets you make more mistakes faster than any other invention, with the possible exceptions of handguns and Tequilla. -- Mitch Ratcliffe

Working...