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Windows Operating Systems Software

Windows 7 Anti-Piracy Plans 403

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the not-the-background-image-no dept.
Slatterz writes "Microsoft has announced that the forthcoming Windows 7 operating system will contain a number of piracy 'tweaks' it says are designed to protect the interests of customers. Under the new regime users will be expected to validate their software in a much more precise way than before. Other Microsoft operating systems and anti-piracy measures, including Windows Genuine Advantage, allowed users to delay 'activation,' but Windows 7 will make it harder to ignore repeated messages. According to Joe Williams, general manager for Worldwide Genuine Windows at Microsoft, counterfeit software 'delivers a poor experience and impacts customer satisfaction with our products, particularly if users do not know that their software is non-genuine.' Williams gave the example of one piracy exploit that caused more than a million reported system crashes on machines running non-genuine Windows Vista before Microsoft was able to resolve it."
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Windows 7 Anti-Piracy Plans

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  • So they can halve their user-share.
    • by spud603 (832173) on Friday May 08, 2009 @03:53PM (#27880965)
      You have it backwards. If hacking the copy protection is harder, then that just makes the task that much more alluring.
    • by againjj (1132651) on Friday May 08, 2009 @04:38PM (#27881705)

      So they can halve their user-share.

      ... among people who understand what is happening, who are a small minority. The average person does not get it. All he knows is that "it doesn't work", and pay someone to "fix it", or simply buy a new computer. These people also are only vaguely aware that there is any other option than Windows (I actually originally wrote "any other option for an OS than Windows", but remembered that the average person does not really know what an OS is) and therefore a difficult time will not push people to other OSs.

      • by Grimbleton (1034446) on Friday May 08, 2009 @05:09PM (#27882145)

        My aunt is of the "Buy new computer when kids fuck up OS by downloading any random shit they come across" mentality.

        I don't mind. I get a reasonably-new computer every year to cannibalize for parts out of it.

        I wish she'd just let me fix it so she could buy a much nicer computer for them to really break something in every two years for better parts...

      • by Lonewolf666 (259450) on Friday May 08, 2009 @06:08PM (#27882889)

        For the average person who got the OS with the computer, activation problems means that Microsoft has NOT gotten Anti-Piracy to work right. Legitimate users should not be bothered by the system.
        If that happens anyway, I guess it will happen across the board, for people with and without solid computer knowledge. Most of them (your "average person") might believe it was their own mistake, but a few will say goodbye to Windows. But overall, I expect the numbers to be small in this category.

        The interesting question is "what happens with the freeloaders if they cannot pirate Windows 7". Lets assume Microsoft comes up with something really hard to crack. It follows that
        1) some will pay up for Windows 7
        2) many will install XP instead (plenty of hacked versions and pirated Corporate Editions in the wild)
        3) some will say goodbye to Windows as above.

        1) is what Microsoft obviously wants.
        2) is sort of what happens right now, but for other reasons (People prefer XP over Vista). Microsoft won't like it, but it will not make their situation worse.
        3) hurts Microsoft's market share, other OS will gain some more visibility.

        My guess:
        Microsoft gains some money from 1) but 3) will hurt them more in the long run.

  • "counterfeit software delivers a poor experience and impacts customer satisfaction with our products, particularly if users do not know that their software is non-genuine."

    Since it's byte for byte identical whether it's "counterfeit" or "real", what does that say about Windows 7?

    • by Anonymous Coward on Friday May 08, 2009 @03:59PM (#27881077)

      Genuine windows was something dreamt up in the marketing department, but the theory is that "counterfeit" copies are virus ridden.

      Basically this just isn't the case, and VLK editions are much nicer to use because of the lack of activation.
      Windows XP 64 was especially awesome because it escaped Microsoft's focus on crappy anti-piracy bloat such as WGA, since it wasn't such a main stream OS. I've never had compatibility problems, so for me, pirated XP64 is the best MS OS ever.

    • by Captain Spam (66120) on Friday May 08, 2009 @04:05PM (#27881187) Homepage

      "You see, when counterfeit software shows up in the hands of some unlucky customer, Big Louie, an associate of ours, shows up as well. After a spirited discussion of the matter with said customer, Big Louie tells us that the customer does not approve of the resulting experience counterfeit software brings and much prefers the experience of genuine software, wherein Big Louie does not intervene."

    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by flitty (981864)
      Ok, this needs to be translated from Marketing-speak.

      "Essentially, Microsoft has put a killswitch/disabling tool in Windows 7 that can shut down/cripple versions of 7 that are pirated. Since this is marketing, we're going to couch the discussion in a way that sounds like we are doing this for the customer, so they know that the overpriced software called Windows 7 wasn't a copied version from a shady supplier."

      The only reason this story is on /. is because it's Marketing Speak from Microsoft, so it's
    • That's not true (Score:2, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward

      Usually the pirates disable those incessant messages begging you to register. Which is the poorer experience?

  • by Jeremi (14640) on Friday May 08, 2009 @03:49PM (#27880923) Homepage

    it says are designed to protect the interests of customers

    Hahahaha!

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by v1 (525388)

      Even for MS, this is surely shoveling the BS to astonishing new heights.

      I think they'd be better off just not commenting on it at all, rather than trying to completely BS us. At these levels all it's doing is insulting our intelligence. Really, who wouldn't cough up their coffee if they had someone trying to say that to them with a straight face?

    • by horatio (127595)

      According to Joe Williams, general manager for Worldwide Genuine Windows at Microsoft, Windows "delivers a poor experience and impacts customer satisfaction with our products..."

      There, fixed that for ya.

    • Yeah, especially since it's followed by, "Other Microsoft operating systems and anti-piracy measures, including Windows Genuine Advantage, allowed users to delay 'activation', but Windows 7 will make it harder to ignore repeated messages."

      So they make it harder for customers to activate when it's convenient for the customer, and makes it harder to ignore the nagging to activate. And the purpose of that is to protect the interests of customers?

      The name "Windows Genuine Advantage" has always seemed like a

    • Microsoft executives are "customers". They buy things!

      You didn't think they meant "Microsoft's customers", did you? ;)

    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by aaaantoine (1540357)
      Don't forget, Microsoft's real customers are its shareholders.
    • Rather than just laugh at it, let's point out that the Microsoft tax is not like a real tax. If your friend pirates it, you personally lose no money. Rather, Microsoft loses money. It has been common knowledge that the amount of currency raked in by Microsoft is in no way proportional to the cost of developing the operating system. (If it was, shareholders would be firing someone.) The real problem here is that we, the people, give the corporations these rights. If the people objected, these imaginary righ
  • Really? (Score:4, Funny)

    by CastrTroy (595695) on Friday May 08, 2009 @03:53PM (#27880967) Homepage
    Are there really people who have a pirated copy and really believe that it's a copy that they have a valid license for? I seriously doubt that more than .05% of people who are running pirated versions of windows actually thing it is geniune. This is just going to annoy people who got mislabeled as pirates, while all the pirates find an easy way to disable this "feature".
    • Re:Really? (Score:5, Insightful)

      by plover (150551) * on Friday May 08, 2009 @03:59PM (#27881069) Homepage Journal
      One of the biggest sources of piracy Microsoft is trying to clamp down on is the local "Joe's Computer Hut"-type shop. Joe puts together motherboards and chips and sells $300 computers, including Windows. But what Joe's customers don't realize is that Joe is installing pirated copies. WGA, for all its nasty ills, is supposed to provide a way to find out if your copy of Windows is really genuine. (Of course if it's not, you're completely screwed, unless you agree to help Microsoft bust Joe for piracy.)
      • Re:Really? (Score:5, Informative)

        by Jamie's Nightmare (1410247) on Friday May 08, 2009 @04:34PM (#27881617)

        One of the biggest sources of piracy Microsoft is trying to clamp down on is the local "Joe's Computer Hut"-type shop. Joe puts together motherboards and chips and sells $300 computers, including Windows. But what Joe's customers don't realize is that Joe is installing pirated copies.

        And I used to work for one. I took a job in Florida working for a company (AVC Concepts of Bradenton, Florida. Now defunct.) that did just that. The owner sold computers with pirated copies of Windows XP installed. Around this time in 2006, Microsoft started to distribute WGA. Needless to say, we got calls from customers who's machines were flagged running pirated copies. It was my job to pick these machines up, bring them back to the shop and replace the pirated OS with a legitimate copy.

        My boss instructed me to lie to customers and tell them that they had a valid copy, but that Microsoft's own Windows Genuine Advantage was fouled up. Blame Microsoft. It's an easy excuse that customers easily accept without much fuss.

        • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

          by Bert64 (520050)

          The one thing MS have done really well, is convince people that computers are inherently unreliable devices that just never work properly...

      • Re:Really? (Score:5, Insightful)

        by nine-times (778537) <nine.times@gmail.com> on Friday May 08, 2009 @04:36PM (#27881653) Homepage

        Sure, but here's the question: How does that help Microsoft's customers? It doesn't help the customer who bought a computer from Joe, because their computer now has stopped working until the customer pays more money. On the other hand, that customer isn't even Microsoft's customer, because that person hasn't bought anything from Microsoft.

        As a Microsoft customer, I don't see how hurting Joe or hurting Joe's customer can help me at all. I can tell you that I've had difficulties in the past with Microsoft's activation and WGA, so I know that these things can hurt customers.

        So that leaves two possibilities, as far as I can tell:

        1. Microsoft is lying when they say WGA is meant to protect the interests of their customers.
        2. Although I have purchased many of copies of Windows and Office through Microsoft's eOpen program, they do not consider me a "customer".

        Either way, this inclines me even further to look for an alternative vendor. I don't like when vendors lie to me, and when the vendor says, "The customer is always right," I want that to be me. When I'm giving someone lots of money, I want them to be trying to keep me happy, and to be reluctant to screw me over.

      • Re:Really? (Score:4, Funny)

        by Anonymous Coward on Friday May 08, 2009 @05:01PM (#27882019)

        Except that for XP, we use VLKs which never get flagged by WGA because they belong to organizations far bigger than us from whom MS will never revoke the keys. Never Ever.

                  - Joe

    • by Knara (9377)

      I think that the anti-piracy stuff for folks that don't know its pirated is more common in non-US and western European locales where you can buy impressively authentic looking XP/Vista on the street for $5.

      No one who gets XP/Vista "from a friend" thinks its legit, unless they're very clueless.

      • by CastrTroy (595695)
        Yeah, but who really thinks that it's genuine when it only costs $5 while the real retails (non street vendor) are selling it for $100. It's a fake rolex. You know it's fake, but you can still tell the time with it, so you probably don't care.
    • Re:Really? (Score:5, Insightful)

      by Applekid (993327) on Friday May 08, 2009 @04:02PM (#27881143)

      Given how hard it is to compete with Dell and HP, I can see smaller system builders wanting to give in to the temptation of not paying the microsoft tax and using the savings to put a pirate version of Windows to make a more attractive price point. Of course, they could put a free OS on it but that would only further enforce that they sell machines that "aren't like the big boy's".

    • Re:Really? (Score:5, Informative)

      by socrplayr813 (1372733) on Friday May 08, 2009 @04:04PM (#27881157)

      Actually, I've seen it quite a bit. Usually what happens is a non-techy person will ask the neighbor kid to fix their computer. The neighbor kid puts on a pirated version because of laziness, anti-MS feelings, lack of a product key, etc. The non-techy person doesn't know the difference and never does manual updates, so they don't find out until WGA tells them.

      • Re:Really? (Score:5, Insightful)

        by _Sprocket_ (42527) on Friday May 08, 2009 @04:35PM (#27881643)

        The neighbor kid puts on a pirated version because of laziness, anti-MS feelings, lack of a product key, etc.

        Or that finding the original media and product key for the box in question is either impossible (no media came with the box - that's what the hidden partition is for) or just nearly impossible ("maybe it's with all those manuals and boxes in the attic"). Dealing with a consumer Windows box is a PITA.

      • Re:Really? (Score:4, Insightful)

        by Anonymous Coward on Friday May 08, 2009 @05:02PM (#27882027)

        You know what? As long as that machine I'm fixing has a sticker on it for a legitimate Windows license key of the same type as the one I'm installing -- I don't fricking care. They got their money. One machine, one license, the transaction is done.

        Microsoft already makes it enough of a nightmare for non-technical users to reinstall their system from scratch, because it is a rarity these days for OEMs to provide proper Windows install disks. I'm not jumping through hoops on my volunteer time just to reassure Microsoft that everything is legitimate. I look at the sticker on the machine, which Microsoft tells me is supposed to be an indication of a legitimate license, and do the task as efficiently as possible. On the off chance that it might not be legitimate, I'm not wasting my time on the phone to verify a license they already sold with the machine and presumably had registered once before. There's nothing in it for me or the person I'm trying to help, unless you count wasted time.

        If they want to pay me for the information or discount Windows if I provide the information so they can track piracy, great. Then I might do it. But the idea that WGA and license activation is in the customer's interest is a joke.

    • Well I think that what Microsoft has tried to claim is that WGA is supposed to protect people from installing pirated versions that might have malware or other malicious hacks pre-installed. It is possible to slipstream hacks into an install DVD and then try to sell it as a real copy. So theoretically WGA could help customers detect that.

      On the other hand, I don't particularly see that as the effect of WGA. For one thing, if someone is clever enough to engage in that sort of behavior, it wouldn't surpri

    • by rAiNsT0rm (877553)

      Or, people like me that have a valid license yet "Windows Genuine Advantage" reports is illegal. That's a great customer experience right there... especially since nowhere does it let me dispute or have it fixed... just a link to buy software I already bought. (Win XP Pro SP2)

  • by Smidge207 (1278042) on Friday May 08, 2009 @03:54PM (#27880973) Journal

    It's amazing that after all this time Microsoft still believe they can win the fight against piracy. As long as there is someone that builds anti-piracy measures in there will be people willing to hack around and take them out. Equal and opposite forces. Look at the iPhone for example; it took very little time for people with no previous knowledge of the device to have a working solution for jailbreaking the phone and installing pirated apps. MS needs to come up with viable solutions instead of crippling the user's experience.

    Oh, shit, that's right, we're talking about Microsoft. Never mind; carry on with Ubuntu installs. ;-)

    =Smidge=

    • by QuantumRiff (120817) on Friday May 08, 2009 @03:58PM (#27881057)

      As a user of an OS that is actually zero cost, I would love to see MS actually enforce piracy protections effectively. That is one way to grow linux use. Once people figure out they can no longer "borrow" their buddies disk, they will start looking for alternatives.. and really, you don't even have to be 100% successful. If you make the process difficult enough, people will give up!

    • by _Sprocket_ (42527)

      It's amazing that after all this time Microsoft still believe they can win the fight against piracy.

      I'm not so sure this is actually about "piracy". What if this is about maintaining a perception? We currently have a lot of industry using commodity OSes (Linux, *BSD... maybe even Solaris). It isn't too far off when we'll look at the OS as a commodity layer. That doesn't bode well with Microsoft's (current) business model.

      At one point, copyright infringement of Windows wasn't a big deal as it just further enforced Windows adoption. However, if you're trying to battle the perception that the OS is a co

    • Look at the iPhone for example; it took very little time for people with no previous knowledge of the device to have a working solution for jailbreaking the phone and installing pirated apps.

      They weren't pirated apps. They were simply not blessed by Apple.

  • by alen (225700) on Friday May 08, 2009 @03:54PM (#27880989)

    because they buy their copy of windows with a new PC from Dell or HP and it's tied to the hardware and probably won't need to be activated.

    for the DIY it probably makes sense to buy a technet sub and get "free" Ultimate copies of the OS. my msdn license keys for Vista say up to 10 activations and you can give it out to other people for "marketing purposes"

    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by Applekid (993327)

      my msdn license keys for Vista say up to 10 activations and you can give it out to other people for "marketing purposes"

      Does it actually say that? Last time I checked out getting an MSDN subscription for free OS and goodies I saw the part about "non-production evaluation purposes only" and figured it's not worth the potential risk opening myself to surprise audits, especially after signing up for a subscription with my real name and address.

    • That is the primary reason why Genuine Disadvantage is so pointless. Almost everyone who owns a PC has licensed copy of Windows. People are not going crazy upgrading their old PC to Vista or Windows 7 as that would be Stupid because it will run so slow on these systems. So piracy of Windows is really low. Office on the other hand is a different story. But GA It gets in your way if you want to Virtualize your OS (Or worse Virtualize a boot partition so you can swap them around), or upgrade your Computer to

  • by earlymon (1116185) on Friday May 08, 2009 @03:56PM (#27881003) Homepage Journal

    ...it says are designed to protect the interests of customers. Under the new regime users will be expected to validate their software in a much more precise way than before... Windows 7 will make it harder to ignore repeated messages.

    That's it - I cannot top that - I can't even try.

  • by Aphoxema (1088507) * on Friday May 08, 2009 @03:56PM (#27881005) Homepage Journal

    Any code made by someone can be broken by someone.

    Some consumers have already realized they don't have to put up with this bullshit, I hope more do every day.

  • Fine (Score:5, Insightful)

    by dedazo (737510) on Friday May 08, 2009 @03:59PM (#27881075) Journal

    As long as this doesn't victimize legitimate users. That's where the whole anti-piracy thing usually breaks down.

  • by jtownatpunk.net (245670) on Friday May 08, 2009 @04:00PM (#27881087)

    "Williams gave the example of one piracy exploit that caused more than a million reported system crashes on machines running non-genuine Windows Vista before Microsoft was able to resolve it."

    WTF do you care what happens to people running pirated copies? Why don't you tell us about all of the times WGA has screwed up legitimate installations with false positives? I've actually had to "hack" a few falsely tagged installations so they'd run until I had time to go through the hassle of getting my system re-legitimized. And I don't maintain that many windows systems. I can only imagine the shitstorm that could be caused in a company with thousands of identical systems that, through some quirk, got nailed with a false positive from WGA.

    WGA does absolutely nothing to protect legitimate consumers. Nothing. The only thing WGA can do to any specific installation is disable it. It can't ENHANCE or IMPROVE the system in any way.

    • WTF do you care what happens to people running pirated copies?

      This isn't about people who intentionall use pirated copies. This is about Bulk, whoelsale pirate copies, where the user has paid someone full price for what they think is a legitimate copy of windows.

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by MeNeXT (200840)

        Do you honestly believe that? WGA has NO way of stopping BULK wholesale pirate copies if the wholesaler knows what he is doing.

        Keep dreaming in your little world because the day that MS gets it right is the day that they will loose market share. You can get complete systems cheaper than you can get a retail XP CD. either they will fill landfills or someone like myself will load an alternate OS.

    • WGA is also Spyware, it reports back to Microsoft the list of software applications you installed on your computer and other things.

  • by Rix (54095) on Friday May 08, 2009 @04:01PM (#27881119)

    Can you really blame people for piracy when you set the retail price of a license at $100-$200 and the big OEM price at $10-$50?

    Pretty soon it'll be easier to get a windows license by buying a netbook and throwing the hardware away.

  • by iamacat (583406) on Friday May 08, 2009 @04:03PM (#27881149)

    Do what you have to to protect your bottom line, but do not bullshit like this. Customer interests would be equally served with an unobtrusive alert that would let them know that the software is probably counterfeit but not interfere with their work.

    Although, I doubt it will really help MS financially. Everyone else is moving away from DRM - think of iTunes - and throughout the history of commercial software, most successful companies were the ones that stayed away from parallel port dongles, non-standard floppy formats or entering "word 6 on line 5 on page 15 of game manual". This included Microsoft until a few years back.

    Besides most of their profit comes from OEMs and business users. Neither group is likely to use counterfeit software. On the other hand, they will be royally pissed off if this affects even 0.01% of their users.

  • Why try to stop the piracy?
    They would be far better-served by selling the Home/Pro versions of the OS at $99 / $149 and allowing easy transport of licenses.

    They only lose tons of money when trying to stop piracy.

    I WOULD pay for it if it meant I could have a physical copy of the OS (on a PRESSED disc) and I didn't have to deal with activation and other such bullshit.

    I would encourage others to "just buy it" if it meant I could easily wipe their Dell and install using their key/disc (seriously, supply custome

    • I also would be much more willing to buy Windows at $100. I want to agree with you. I really do.

      BUT, there's always going to be a group of people who will take advantage and try to get it for free. Microsoft no doubt knows that they're just flushing the money and losing the arms race, but I'm sure they see no other option. Their honest customers are stuck paying full price and most of the rest will never pay anyway.

      It sucks all the way around.

  • by Distan (122159) on Friday May 08, 2009 @04:09PM (#27881261)

    The words all make sense by themselves, but collectively it is like he is trying to redefine every word he uses.

    > "Consumers face potential identity theft, system failures and unrecoverable data loss,"

    That isn't a consequence of piracy. It may be the consequence of malware, spyware, worms, or viruses, but you can't blame piracy for any of that.

    > "Customers want to know that they are using the genuine high-quality Microsoft product they paid for, and they want to know that their systems are more secure and that their software does not contain malicious code"

    What about customers who want to use Microsoft products without paying for them at all. Not to defend them, but that is what we are talking about when we discuss piracy. If someone takes a "genuine" copy of Windows and disables your license validation code, what does that have to do with making their system more or less secure and what does it have to do with malicious code. If anything, a hacked copy of Windows may be more secure and less malicious because it isn't "phoning home" to Microsoft.

    > "We see many cases of customers who wanted to buy genuine software and believed they did, only to find out later that they were victims of software piracy."

    Wow. This one just made my head hurt. They are completely trying to redefine victim here. That's like calling a bank robber the victim of his crime because he stubbed his toe running out of the bank.

    I guess I'm supposed to read all the above and think that Microsoft is acting benevolently to make sure no malicious code has been inserted into the operating system at install time. If that was really some sort of crisis that needed to be solved, they could simply ship install CDs with known signatures and provide a mechanism for checking those signature. Problem solved with no need for checking hardware configurations, issuing serial numbers, tracking activations, etc.

    What a bunch of asshats.

  • by Toreo asesino (951231) on Friday May 08, 2009 @04:10PM (#27881281) Journal

    Believe it or not, there's actually something to say about ensuring Windows is "genuine" as such; and really this is new to Vista +...

    I've seen a few Vista installs now where Windows was completely screwed (no laughing at the back) for no apparent reason, and more importantly would not update. On digging around a bit more, it turned out almost in every case they'd downloaded it off bittorrent/emule, burnt it to disc, and fired it up.

    Thing is, Vista is more flexible than ever for OEMs and system builders to streamline their own stuff into the install process so this is a hackers dream; take most popular OS on the planet; "Customise" it with rootkit/trojan; release to downloaders via bittorent and tada...pre-rooted Windows for the pirating masses.

    So that's why there is some value in knowing your Windows came from Microsoft direct (rather than some h4x0r)

  • Poor experience? (Score:5, Interesting)

    by Anita Coney (648748) on Friday May 08, 2009 @04:17PM (#27881373) Homepage

    counterfeit software "delivers a poor experience and impacts customer satisfaction with our products

    Obviously he hasn't tried Johnny's Ultimate version of XP. It's awesome! A great experience and it offers great satisfaction. MS should hire him.

  • To Trash-Bin with the whole thing already!

  • YOU SUCK! [andyousuck.com]

    Seriously, does anyone REALLY this to work? All it will do is cut down on the absolutely MOST casual pirates and annoy legitimate customers. The tighter they make it, the more this is true. Determined individuals WILL ALWAYS find a way to circumvent their measures. ALWAYS.

    I'm not likely to pirate an OS...I like being able to run it with all the updates and I'm happy knowing that my software is legit...but that's certainly not even a close consideration as to what most people are going to do.

    Loo

  • Just when you thought it was safe to click the "later" option, an all new treat awaits our valued and loyal customers who upgrade to the best ever version of Windows. From the lovely people who brought you such well loved classics as the WGA and it's sister OGA. Now with their latest innovation, new improved nagware. This time it's even harder to stop.

    Our patented nagware is a guaranteed success because we say so, and believe us, if you don't say so, we'll know and pay you a visit to "educate" you. All of o
  • false positives.

    For example under Windows XP, if the Firewall blocked the WGA verification internet connection, your copy of XP got called "grayware" because it could not verify the genuineness of the XP install.

    If you reformatted and reinstalled, sometimes you got activation problems anyway, requiring you to log on to your Passport account and activate the Windows that way, and then WGA still says you might not be legit.

    With Microsoft forcing activation, it will only lead to more "false positives" in genuine Windows usage.

  • This is a great news. PC sales will drop even more. Since, users will not migrate to Linux. This is one more component that average PC users will stick to their XP forever! Oh, Microsoft. When will you ever learn? Your monopolistic behavior will slowly destroy you. Let's shoot for additional 10,000 layoffs for Microsoft! Baller can yell, "I'm not a CEO. I'm a football coach. We will destroy everything!" Their PC vendor pals will be so glad that their best friend is Microsoft. Happiness.
  • let's all pirate (Score:4, Insightful)

    by requiemnoise (1550609) on Friday May 08, 2009 @05:00PM (#27881999)
    I'm going to recommend people to pirate a copy of Win7 once a crack comes out.This is going to be so much fun. Why bother going through a hassle of nightmare after paying $120? Who enjoys getting punched in the face after you have given them some money? Go piracy!
  • You gotta love it (Score:3, Interesting)

    by AnalPerfume (1356177) on Friday May 08, 2009 @05:17PM (#27882265)
    Just like 1984 where ministries were named for the opposite of what they do, Microsoft have taken the old Mac advert a bit too literally. WGA is only an advantage to Microsoft, not the end user. DRM gives the content holders the right to restrict and punish users. I guess if truth in advertising was mandatory concepts like WSGD or Windows Sometimes Genuine Disadvantage wouldn't go down well.
  • by Myria (562655) on Friday May 08, 2009 @05:18PM (#27882289)

    As is somewhat well-known, Microsoft's license agreement says only the Ultimate, Business and possibly Home Premium editions are permitted to be run under a virtual machine. In Vista, they didn't enforce this technologically.

    This might change in Windows 7. I found some assembly code in the Windows 7 beta kernel that was detecting whether it was running under a virtual machine. This code was in functions clearly related to license management. The beta version was Ultimate, so I don't think anyone noticed that VMs don't work...

  • uhh, wait a minute (Score:4, Insightful)

    by DragonTHC (208439) <Dragon@gamerslST ... .com minus berry> on Friday May 08, 2009 @05:47PM (#27882617) Homepage Journal

    delivers a poor experience and impacts customer satisfaction with our products

    nope, that's not piracy, that's by design.

  • by billcopc (196330) <vrillco@yahoo.com> on Friday May 08, 2009 @07:43PM (#27883681) Homepage

    Activation is a pain in the ass, always has been. The only result of this "stronger" activation will be more piracy, because the cracked version is liberated from this draconian bullshit.

    It's true for games, it's even more true for Windows. If I have the option of installing my genuine, licenced copy and fuss with reactivation every time I upgrade (few months), or going with a cracked/VLK version that doesn't have that nagware, I'll go with the cracked one, because my time is actually worth something to me and I'm not about to waste an hour on the phone with Microsoft's 3rd-world scripted support staff to beg for permission to upgrade my hard disk.

What this country needs is a dime that will buy a good five-cent bagel.

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