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KDE GUI Software Upgrades

KDE 4.3 Released 432

Posted by kdawson
from the get-yer-fresh-bits dept.
Jos Poortvliet writes "After another 6 months of hard work by over 700 people, after fixing over 10,000 bugs and granting 2,000 wishes, KDE 4.3, or 'Caizen,' is here (the release takes its nickname from the Japanese philosophy of continuous improvement). The KDE Desktop Workspace introduces, besides the usual stability and speed improvements, new widgets, the ability to 'peek' in a folder with folderview, and activities tied to virtual desktops. The KDE Application Suites feature improvements in the utilities like a more formats supported in Ark and the return of the Linux Infrared Remote Control system. Instant messenger Kopete introduces an improved contact list and KOrganizer can sync with Google Calendar. Kmail supports inserting inline images into email and the Alarm notifier has gained export functionality, drag and drop, and has an improved configuration. The KDE Application Development platform has seen work on integrating the Social Desktop and the new system tray protocol from Freedesktop.org. You can watch a screencast of the Desktop Workspace here."
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KDE 4.3 Released

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  • by bheer (633842) <rbheer@g[ ]l.com ['mai' in gap]> on Tuesday August 04, 2009 @03:07PM (#28946651)

    ...interesting to see the KDE team drop the K from a word where it'd actually be appropriate [wikipedia.org].

  • making progress (Score:3, Interesting)

    by hannson (1369413) <hannson@gmail.com> on Tuesday August 04, 2009 @03:16PM (#28946779)

    I'm not trying to troll here. It certainly looks more polished than the train wreck that 4.1 and 4.2 was, but is it just me or do QT4 and GTK applications just look ... bigger/clunky/unpolished when compared to Windows / KDE3.5 applications?
     
    That said, I like that it's making progress!

    • I hope so. KDE 4.2 was such a mess that I uninstalled Intrepid and went back to Hardy. Maybe 4.3 will work well in Karmic but if KPackageKit is anything to go by I'm not holding my breath.

      • Re:making progress (Score:5, Informative)

        by Narishma (822073) on Tuesday August 04, 2009 @03:31PM (#28947031)

        Your problem is not KDE, it's Kubuntu. One of the worst KDE distros I've every tried.

        • by owlstead (636356)

          Don't know, tried the live cd, couldn't get wireless working, downloaded Ubuntu. C'mon, that one they should have seen coming. If you can't get that right, you may as well release at a later date. Maybe they should have used 3.5 for 9.04, or they should have tried another wireless configuration utility, but this blows.

        • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

          by Svenne (117693)

          Agreed, ever since Kubuntu switched from KDE 3 to 4 it's been crap. After years with KDE, not wanting to give up the goodness that is Ubuntu (apt, mostly) I had to switch to GNOME. I've tried KDE 4.1 and 4.2 occasionally, but it's still unusable. Just something as stupid as the "search field" in the "K-menu" (or whatever it's called nowdays); sometimes it registers presing enter, and sometimes it doesn't. Maybe I'll want to start "konsole" and I'll just type "konsole" and press enter. Sometimes it starts, o

        • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

          by Sir_Lewk (967686)

          Semi related to this, people using Fedora (which is probably packages and integrates KDE the best of any distro I've tried) can get 4.3 by enabling the Redhat KDE testing repos from http://kde-redhat.sourceforge.net/ [sourceforge.net]

          I just installed it about an hour ago and have been pretty impressed with the improvement from 4.2. In particular, the notifications are very improved and kopete is actually verging on usable again. General polish all around is certainly helping too.

    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by ammorais (1585589)

      No. If you are referring to the looks it's a matter of taste.
      If you are referring to Qt, I can tell you that the Qt toolkit is at this point nothing less than Windows Libraries. If you are referring to polishment you should talk about specific applications and not the whole toolkits. Take Smplayer for example. It's an app that is exactly he same on windows an Linux(and I actually like it better on Linux).
      Qt 4 is relatively new, and it was from my point of view a necessary break from Qt3. The great modifica

    • Re:making progress (Score:5, Interesting)

      by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday August 04, 2009 @03:27PM (#28946961)

      I really liked 4.2 already and have been using it for a while now. As for the looks: I think it's just a matter of getting used to it. Now that I worked with 4.2 a while I find KDE 3 applications to look bigger / clunky / unpolished.
      When I first switched from Windows to Linux I also found KDE 3 applications to look unpolished. After using it for a while and after getting used to the style I suddenly found Windows to look unpolished.

      But I'd say it took me way less time to get used to the KDE 4 looks then it did with KDE 3 so I guess they are in fact more polished ;)

    • kde 3.5 (and windows, last I looked at it) had much more tiny graphics because the screens they were intended to be displayed on were much smaller. Nowdays, 1280x1024 19" lcd is pretty much low end whereas it was top of the line 5 years ago. So qt & kde evolves, and that's fine by me. I run 4.2 ATM, and while I'm eagerly waiting for 4.3, to iron out some quirks, I don't consider it a train wreck. 4.0 was rushed out and 4.1 made it somewhat barely usable, but 4.2 is really what 4.0 should have been in th
      • by vlm (69642)

        1280x1024 ...... is pretty much low end whereas it was top of the line 5 years ago

        Sure about that? I bought a nice CRT in the mid 90s with that res, maybe 1996 when the 1600x1200s came out and the price for the "old" 1280s started dropping. It was by no means top of the line at that time. I haven't owned a monitor below 1600x1200 since the turn of the millennium. And I've always bought new, and never spent more than $500 (always thought the $2000 monitor guys went a little overboard).

        According to

        http://www.vaughns-1-pagers.com/computer/video-resolution.htm [vaughns-1-pagers.com]

        1280x1024 was first released

      • Nowdays, 1280x1024 19" lcd is pretty much low end

        In laptops, 1024x600 (9"/10") is low-end, and a few bargain-basement models have 800x480 (7").

    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by Draek (916851)

      is it just me or do QT4 and GTK applications just look ... bigger/clunky/unpolished when compared to Windows / KDE3.5 applications?

      It's just you.

      Also, if you honestly didn't want to troll you should've left out the "train wreck" comment from your post, it wouldn't have changed its meaning while being much less inflammatory.

      • by hannson (1369413)

        I agree, it was a little too cold. I personally didn't like the 4.x but this looks like something I might actually like to use, a step to the right direction. I just find the difference from 4.2->4.3 that noticeable that I allowed myself to call previous versions a "train wreck". YMMV

      • Re:making progress (Score:4, Interesting)

        by pyrico (1034804) on Tuesday August 04, 2009 @03:43PM (#28947201)

        Actually, it's probably not just him.

        Qt4 has larger spacing margins and padding on widgets by default in there layout system than Qt3. Also, I believe KDE4 uses larger fonts and more anti-aliasing than KDE3 systems, so the same dialog with the same set of widgets and text most likely is larger in KDE4 on a pixel basis.

        That said, you can probably control this to some extent with font settings etc, but the widget padding and margins are up to the application developer.

        • Re:making progress (Score:4, Insightful)

          by Enderandrew (866215) <enderandrew AT gmail DOT com> on Tuesday August 04, 2009 @04:08PM (#28947581) Homepage Journal

          What gets me is that while there as some Plasma devs working on a Netbook containment for small screens, we haven't seen a widget theme/overall theme designed for small screens.

          Between mobile phones, netbooks and smartbooks, you think Nokia/Qt would be all over this. If not, then perhaps the KDE devs themselves would come up with a good solution here.

        • Re:making progress (Score:4, Insightful)

          by david_thornley (598059) on Tuesday August 04, 2009 @04:57PM (#28948203)

          You know, bigger margins and padding are why I ditched the Aero look on Vista, and selected an earlier, uglier, but denser style. Criticize my aesthetics if you will, but I like displays that give me more information in a given screen area.

          (Reminds me of a woman I knew in college, taking a "Physics for Poets" class and complaining about the two-sheet limit on exam notes, which really didn't allow all that much with beautiful handwriting and large amounts of whitespace. I compared it to a 3"x5" card I'd been allowed for a serious science course.)

    • Mostly you, but it is true that GTK apps will use more images than their windows competitors. Don't know why, must just be a HID thing.

      KDE seemed to have wasted space in the initial KDE4 release, but I haven't checked on it in such a long time so I have no idea what it's like.

      Still, I find GTK and Qt to be a lot more colourful than Windows, regardless of themes on either platform.

      • The wasted space issue is part of the Oxygen widget theme. It drives me nuts as well, but frankly I don't know how to make a new Qt4/KDE4 widget theme. So I keep waiting and hoping that someone else will come up with a tighter Oxygen theme. That being said, the actual Oxygen theme has been tightened up a bit since the 4.0 launch.

    • Re:making progress (Score:5, Insightful)

      by StormReaver (59959) on Tuesday August 04, 2009 @03:56PM (#28947383)

      It's a matter of opinion, as I see GTK and Windows looking ugly and clunky, and Qt/KDE looking beautiful and polished.

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by Tubal-Cain (1289912)
        So do I, but what I don't see KDE as is functional. The 'Start' menu is just downright painful to use.
    • by Burz (138833) on Tuesday August 04, 2009 @04:21PM (#28947791) Journal

      I like GUIs as much as anyone (and its the reason why the last system I bought is a Mac) but as a 10-year Linux user I already know this new package of FOSS loveliness is not going to save Kubuntu from being truly awful. It doesn't change the fact that so much in the Kubuntu GUI is broken (like not being able to set a static IP).

      And I suspect this release will not suddenly display some inspiration or direction for either of those projects. What I will have, yet again, is a pile of (sometimes brilliantly coded) pieces that don't quite fit together or come together to make end users say, "Oh, I get it!"

      There is a heap of stuff that KDE (and Gnome, and the distros) won't do because no one (not a single soul) will ever take responsibility for facilitating critical use cases across these projects. And that is why after all these years, the Linux desktop still "feels wrong" to most techies (and more confounding to average users than other OSes).

      Some weeks back I was considering a switch to Gnome, but then a story popped up on Slashdot (with impeccable timing) announcing that Gnome will be put through the same whole-integer re-write process that KDE just went through.

      No thanks.

      • by dotancohen (1015143) on Wednesday August 05, 2009 @06:36AM (#28954803) Homepage

        There is a heap of stuff that KDE (and Gnome, and the distros) won't do because no one (not a single soul) will ever take responsibility for facilitating critical use cases across these projects.

        Such as what? State some examples so that the ball can get rolling. If it is a ball that KDE needs to get rolling, I'll file the bugs but I need you to tell me what is missing. Thanks!

  • "Activities can now be tied to virtual desktops, allowing users to have different widgets on each of their desktops."

    THIS is what i've been waiting for. I don't know why it was not there to begin with. Glad it's here. I wonder if it'll break my Mandriva One-modified KDE4.x, however. It would be nice to get back the ability to change the backgrounds on the login widget as well as the background when the desktop is locked. Mandriva seems to cripple that feature for the non-paid installs, and none of my sleuth

    • So does this mean that different virtual desktops can have different wallpapers? I'm a very visual person, so different wallpapers are very important to me to emphasize the difference between each virtual desktop.
      • For KDE when did that ability go away? In 3.5 you can have each virtual desktop have it's own wallpaper.
        I was told that in 4.3 you would finally be able to have SystemTray widgets on two differnt toolbars. I've ofetn lamented for this at work were I use a dual display setup on y laptop.

        When I read the release notes I hope it's there.

        My new wish is that if you use dual displays then each display is it's on virtual desktop.

        • by 0racle (667029) on Tuesday August 04, 2009 @04:02PM (#28947479)
          It went away when Plasma became another layer above the window managers virtual desktops. Had plasma simply been a library and a method for displaying desktop widgets this wouldn't have happened but some retard had to have it this way, so away went different wallpapers for different virtual desktops, along with a lot of other features KDE3 had though most regressions were not because of plasma.

          I still don't know what the hell plasma activities are supposed to do, except break things. They don't do anything that virtual desktops don't.

          Anyway, now with KDE 4.3 you can have one activity for all your virtual desktops or have one activity per virtual desktop. If you do the former, you can have all your desktop widgets on all desktops (handy so you don't have to switch around to use that folder you put on your desktop or to check the weather) but loose the ability to have different wallpapers for those desks OR you can have different wallpapers by having a different activity on each virtual desktop and loose the ability to share widgets across all desktops. So if you want that folder or your weather widget on every desktop, you're going to launch a separate instance for each activity.
          • by davidsyes (765062) on Tuesday August 04, 2009 @04:16PM (#28947703) Homepage Journal

            I want to mod funny... But, i want to respond, too.

            It's really nice to be able to show off the KDE (compiz/KDE/Mandriva/et al) desktop rotting the cubes and polygon desktops around, in ONLY 256 MB of SHARED VIDEO RAM,not the umpteen .75 GB or 2GB vista demanded before even turning on Aero. It's a nice, good feeling to have people looking over my shoulder or asking about that desktop, and being able to say, "No, this is not Vista. It's KDE, in Linux. And, this has been possible about or more than a year prior to Vista's release, and i had some of these features working on a 128 MB graphics card from CompUSA, and even wowed the Comcast guy who was restoring my service back in late 2006..."

            Makes people wonder who the hell decided vista needed all that graphics power to do what Linux (and Mac) have been on lesser resources. Conjures up thoughts of collusion/screwing the consumer --- depending on one's perspective, that is...

  • by FooAtWFU (699187) on Tuesday August 04, 2009 @03:24PM (#28946909) Homepage
    I wish for a hundred million dollars.

    And world peace. And a pony. And the year of Linux on the desktop.

  • fixing 10,000 bugs (Score:5, Interesting)

    by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday August 04, 2009 @03:37PM (#28947111)

    No, they did not fix 10,000 bugs. They closed 10,000 bug reports, which is a completely different thing.

    Many of the bug reports were dupes. And many more were closed for one reason or another without actually fixing the reported problem.

    • And many bugs were simply closed WONTFIX because the bugs pertain to old versions that are no longer being maintained.

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by JohnFluxx (413620)

      Many bugs, presumably, were fixed without having bug reports.

  • KDevelop4? (Score:4, Interesting)

    by DoofusOfDeath (636671) on Tuesday August 04, 2009 @03:39PM (#28947125)

    While we're on the topic, does anyone know if/when KDevelop4 will be released?

    • Re:KDevelop4? (Score:4, Informative)

      by Vectronic (1221470) on Tuesday August 04, 2009 @03:51PM (#28947337)

      It's currently in Beta 4, and judging by the release times of the previous Betas, and assuming Beta 4 is the last before the final release, I would guess the somewhere between the end of this month, and the end of September.

      I know that doesn't really help, but if you are really that interested, start playing with the beta.

    • Beta 4 was released on 28 June, so you'll need to wait a bit.

  • After the Japanese word Karoshi [wikipedia.org].

  • I Ran KDE4.2 (Score:5, Interesting)

    by mpapet (761907) on Tuesday August 04, 2009 @03:54PM (#28947373) Homepage

    Whew. The snarky comments about KDE are pretty crazy.

    I still have it on my Debian testing/unstable laptop. It's not a very new laptop and KDE4.2 ran very quickly on it. The desktop itself did not have glaring issues. None of the eye candy is enabled by default, so it doesn't look immediately fabulous on Debian. But turn stuff on and there's plenty of prettiness available. There were issues with Korganizer, so it sounds like they cleaned it up quite a bit. For the most part, I don't use konqueror any more since I found bojourfoxy. http://andrew.tj.id.au/projects/bonjourfoxy/ [tj.id.au]

    It's clear there is a huge amount of activity going into these releases because whole features have been rewritten since kde4.0. Over time, it looks like most of the common KDE applications have been ported to kde4 too, so there's still solid interest in the desktop.

    It looks like they are continuing their efforts to simplify working with KDE as a programmer. So, maybe the bigger KDE4 story that isn't covered as much on slashdot is the programming side?

    I'm actually using XFCE4 at the moment for no good reason other than change is good. It's leaner, with enough eye candy for me.

  • So I hope a real step towards real stability and feature richness as seen in KDEv3.5.
    KDE v3 is dead, long live to KDE ... v4!
  • KDE vs Vista vs 7 (Score:5, Interesting)

    by Enderandrew (866215) <enderandrew AT gmail DOT com> on Tuesday August 04, 2009 @04:00PM (#28947453) Homepage Journal

    It really bothers me when I hear people make uninformed silly comparisons saying that KDE 4 just copies Vista or 7. Honestly, I think there are some great "pillars" that have great potential, but sadly are still under developed, such as Sonnet and Nepomuk I think KDE 4 is just starting to really come into its own and can become a truly great desktop. I just don't think it has delivered on its potential yet.

    Conversely, in the areas that perhaps KDE should consider taking a page from Microsoft, they refuse to do so. When I've suggested to Aaron Seigo that he solve the "no-right-click" problem when designing Plasma to also be fully usable on a touch-screen, I suggested he take a page from 7 and use a multi-touch gesture such as 7's for a right-click. In 7, you hold one finger down and then tap with a second finger for a right-click. Aaron deleted my suggestion. I made it a second time thinking maybe I didn't post it, and he deleted it a second time. I've made suggestions to maybe take a few cues from 7's taskbar, and those are always deleted as well.

    Is it honestly some great sin to emulate the better features of other desktops? Hasn't KDE done that from the beginning?

    • Comparison to Windows or even OS X is funny. You know why? KDE is also a gigantic suite of Windows applications which uses native Windows frameworks, controls. Same for OS X version. For example, a lot of open source developers expect ogg native playback on the host OS. What do I do? I simply install quicktime componenents from Xiph.

      Best way is watching it compile on OS X, you will figure the magic.

      That is a single proof you need when you talk about people -not- understanding what KDE 4 revolution is for op

  • by Enderandrew (866215) <enderandrew AT gmail DOT com> on Tuesday August 04, 2009 @04:04PM (#28947503) Homepage Journal

    From the KDE 4.0 launch and on, Kubuntu/Ubuntu has been shipping some pretty broken packages. I don't want to hate on the Kubuntu developers/packages, but it is the simple truth. And it sure seems like everytime I hear a complaint about KDE 4.x, it is from someone who had a bad experience trying KDE 4.x in *buntu land.

    If that is the case, might I suggest that you try a better KDE distro? openSUSE, Arch Linux and Sabayon would be recommendations, in that order.

    Here is a weekly snapshot openSUSE/KDE 4 SVN live CD.

    http://download.opensuse.org/repositories/KDE:/Medias/images/iso/KDE4-UNSTABLE-Live.i686-1.3.62-Build1.1.iso [opensuse.org]

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by RAMMS+EIN (578166)

      I've noticed this, too. I installed Ubuntu 9.10 at some point (because the kernel has support for some of the hardware in my PC that kernels in other Ubuntu versions don't support), and about every single KDE app I used was seriously broken. I know KDE is better than that. Now, I know 9.10 is not an actual release yet, so there is time to fix things, but I find it interesting that there is nowhere near as much breakage outside KDE packages. What gives?

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by Kalinda (980204)
        The problem, as ever, is that Kubuntu gets the seriously short end of the stick. I used to use it (before I switched to Arch with KDEmod/Chakra) and it worked alright before KDE 4 came out. However, since KDE 4 it's been generally slow and the developers have taken longer than other distros to get new KDE releases or beta/RCs out. And then there was the idea of forcing KDE 4 on all their users in version 4.1 when it wasn't ready for regular use. I see they've since realized the error and are offering both K
    • by moonbender (547943) <moonbender@NoSPaM.gmail.com> on Tuesday August 04, 2009 @04:26PM (#28947837)

      And it sure seems like everytime I hear a complaint about KDE 4.x, it is from someone who had a bad experience trying KDE 4.x in *buntu land.

      That could also be due to the fact that *buntu is the most popular distribution (I'd guess by a fair margin these days), particularly among newbies who tend to get stuck (and, sometimes, give up) easily.

  • Folder Sneek?? (Score:3, Interesting)

    by B5_geek (638928) on Tuesday August 04, 2009 @04:04PM (#28947511)

    I'd like to give all these dev's that pushed/forced us away from tree/folder view a boot to the head. X-Tree Gold in the DOS days had more functionality then a modern file-manager does.

    Here is a hint that you are doing something wrong:

    If you have to spend time adding functionality to a program that worked before you removed another function, YOU ARE DOING IT WRONG!

    I have recently moved to OSX for a big project I am working on, and I curse Steve Jobs mother every time I need to use Finder and open a dozen different windows/work my way through several nested folders that 3 mouse clicks would do in Windows Explorer/Konq. (from v3.5)

  • Disclaimer: I have not installed KDE 4.3 - yet - and I run Kubuntu 9.04.

    First off, I would like to applaud the team for the work they did and continue to do for KDE. I have really pleased with how far they have come from 4.0 - which made Enlightement look full featured and bug free. I'm looking forward to improvements to Amarok and Kopete - especially with respect to the new Kopete Facebook chat plug-in. (I currently use Pidgin because it has facebook chat and it has killer-apps status - soon I'll kill s
  • App Geometry (Score:3, Interesting)

    by kmahan (80459) on Tuesday August 04, 2009 @04:53PM (#28948137)

    Did they fix the ability to specify a geometry when starting an app (like Konsole) AND have it honored?

    In 4.2 you could specify it, but it was ignored.

  • by RogueSeven (965183) on Tuesday August 04, 2009 @05:01PM (#28948257)
    As a windows user for my entire life making the switch to Linux over the summer of 2007, I was nothing but thrilled with the looks, functionality, and personalization (through customization) KDE 3.5 had to offer. At the time, I wrote off Gnome as too different from what I was used to. After several months of falling completely in love with my OS/KDE, I began to strongly evangelize the use of Linux on the desktop, convincing a small handful of friends (doing my part for the whole "Year Of.." thing).

    I went with the flow when KDE 4 took over. Although I was pretty disappointed with a lot of things (removal of a ton of Konqueror functionality that Dolphin sure as heck didn't replace/replace well, plasma crashing all the time, list could go on but I'm not trying to bash KDE or anything here), I kept patiently waiting for the promise of a stable, beautiful, better-than-3.5 desktop. When even 4.2 didn't fix a lot of the things wrong with my system, I finally decided to switch desktops until they got their act together.

    KDE's problem is that my original plan has changed. I've gotten so acquainted to my new environment, that I can't see myself switching back to KDE anymore. It's not just inertial that's a factor here, I genuinely like my current setup. I used the word problem there not because I believe a single user matters to KDE, or any other F/OSS project for that matter, but because I wonder how many people are just like me: Hopped off the KDE bus, originally planning to get back on a few stops down the road, but have now opted for a different mode of transportation altogether (do I get points for bad car analogy here??). To boot, I am relatively young, and a sworn lifelong Linux user; there are many years of my life of Desktop Environment usage left.

    At any rate, when Linus slammed KDE months ago [slashdot.org], I was still on the fence. Now I'm pretty much in full agreement with him, minus the whole flamewar thing.

    Here's the part where I'm pouring out champagne on my floor. "Thanks for the memories, KDE". I loved you, and I'll miss you.
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      I cannot believe the parent was modded troll. I have been a desktop Linux user, going on 12 years now. I've used many other window managers, Fvwm, twm, WindowMaker, Blackbox, Fluxbox, CDE, xfce, and even Gnome. So I have tried many different window managers, and have been able to easily adapt to different GUIs with relatively little pain. KDE has been my primary desktop for the last 5-6 years, that is until KDE 4.x came along.

      I gave KDE 4 an honest test drive, that lasted less than a week. Much of the

      • by ion.simon.c (1183967) on Tuesday August 04, 2009 @08:33PM (#28950515)

        *shrug*
        a) You should check out 4.3. It's nice.
        b) Xinerama is going away, dont'cha know? If you haven't tried xrandr, you might want to. If you have, and it doesn't work like you'd expect, see if the fixes are in the works.
        c) When you try out 4.2 or 4.3, give the "Folder View" configuration a spin:
        * Right-click on the desktop
        * Click on "Appearance Settings"
        * Change the "Desktop Activity" "Type" to "Folder View"
        * Click "Okay" or "Apply"

      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by deathguppie (768263)

        I agree with you in some points.. I loved the KDE3 polish. The way I could right click on an image and change it from tga to png on the fly. The way sftp, and smb worked in all the save and open dialogs. It was a pleasure to operate. However, I'm a graphics nut and I do love the new interface. I also like the search in the menu. I can no longer get used to Gnome for that one reason.

        KDE is coming together, albeit slowly but it is coming. I've been using Digikam, and Amarok, and Kdenlive lately.

        • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

          by 10Ghz (453478)

          "KDE is coming together, albeit slowly but it is coming."

          Slowly? Huh? 4.0 was crap. 6 months later we got 4.1 which was a lot better, but not there yet. 1 year after 4.0 we got 4.2 which was really good. And now we are getting 4.3.

          KDE4 is only 18 months old. 18 months. During that 18 months KDE4 has changed A LOT. Compared to KDE3, KDE4 is progressing really, REALLY fast. In KDE3, 18 months got us from KDE 3.0 to KDE3.1.4.

  • by ColaMan (37550) on Tuesday August 04, 2009 @05:53PM (#28948967) Homepage Journal

    Does KDE/Gnome do a panning widget yet? Spent months trying to get panning working on my 800x400 eeePC, wrote a little hacked up util to watch the mouse and pan screen as necessary, eventually gave up with that kludge and went back to XP which does panning out of the box.

    Fucking xorg - all they responded with after they dropped 'native' support for panning in xrandr is that it's a problem for the DE to deal with. DE's don't seem to care too much as all they're doing is working on 3D eye-candy. Forget basic functionality like a virtual panning screen, that's in the too-hard basket.

  • by oneandoneis2 (777721) * on Tuesday August 04, 2009 @06:23PM (#28949337) Homepage
    I'm stuck with XP all day, but courtesy of the folks at KDE on Windows [kde.org] it's still possible to check out the release candidate for 4.3, and soon 4.3 itself should be available too. As detailed on my blog [oneandoneis2.org], it's as simple as:

    Go to the website and grab the installer (kdewin-installer-gui-latest.exe). Should download in seconds, then you can run it to start the REAL downloading and installation process.

    Stick with all the default unless you have good reason not to. Apart from anything else, most servers don't seem to have the "unstable 4.2.95" package. I got mine from ftp-stud.fht-esslingen.de

    Skip all the language packs unless you really need them, install the rest. Let it get on with it. When it finishes, check the "run system settings after exit" box and finish.

    It has some slightly odd choices for the defaults, so I went through and set everything to "Oxygen" to make it consistent & easy. But the main reason to run this thing is just to check that the QT apps work on your machine before you try and run the full KDE environment.

    Assuming it works, try a few of the other KDE apps that will have appeared in your Start menu. It has games! :o)

    To get KDE itself running, you need to run something which is, for some reason, not in the options in the KDE submenu in the Start menu. Go figure. Why would they want to make it easy to run KDE on Windows after you've downloaded KDE for Windows..?

    To get the actual desktop environment, you need to run plasma-desktop.exe, which in a default install will be in C:\Program Files\KDE\bin

    That should launch your KDE experience, and you can have a play from there. So far, it's a little unstable (Should be better once 4.3-proper is available) but otherwise performing fairly well.

  • Quanta for KDE4? (Score:3, Interesting)

    by JoeCommodore (567479) <larry@portcommodore.com> on Tuesday August 04, 2009 @10:19PM (#28951365) Homepage

    Does that mean that Quanta web development tool will be native to KDE4 finally?

  • 10,000 bugs? (Score:3, Insightful)

    by smash (1351) on Tuesday August 04, 2009 @10:48PM (#28951555) Homepage Journal
    So, in 6 months, in going from the KDE 4.2 that was widely lauded as "the KDE4 for end users" or "what KDE4 should have been", they've squashed over 10,000 bugs?

    Wait, what?

    What actual advantages are there to KDE3.5 for "getting shit done"? Really, I want to know...

    I've briefly checked out KDE4.0, 4.1 and 4.2, and immediately been turned off (as a long time KDE user since before 1.0). Its as if they got rid of all the developers who had a clue and replaced them with Javascript web flunkies.

    It just feels "wrong", unfamiliar and awkward to use - for no good reason that I can discern (why the fuck do i need a "plasmoid" to store folders in, what the fuck is wrong with my desktop - just for starters?)... and thats coming from someone who loved KDE 2.0 through 3.5 and was looking forward to further development down the same path...

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