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Communications Technology

Pedro Matias Sets New Texting Record At Mobile World Cup 70

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the text-invalid-if-bff-appears-anywhere-in-it dept.
Pedro Matias showed off his mad txtin sklz at this year's Mobile World Cup and managed to set a new record for "fastest, most accurate" texts as determined by the event's corporate owners. "history was made when Portugal's Pedro Matias set the new World's Record for texting by typing a 264-character text in just 1 minute 59 seconds (besting the previous record by 23 seconds). Of course, each Mobile World Cup must have its share of controversy -- in this case, Engadget Mobile's very own Chris Ziegler led a silent protest during the awards ceremony. The group was reportedly upset over the use of QWERTY phones (the LG enV3 in this case) to break the record."
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Pedro Matias Sets New Texting Record At Mobile World Cup

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  • by qoncept (599709) on Friday January 15, 2010 @04:17PM (#30784056) Homepage
    The guy that can type that text that fast, or the guy that feels the need to protest qwerty keyboards?
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by JoshuaZ (1134087)

      Right, and that's being said by the guy who has a link to Droidipedia in his sig...

      Seriously, this is an impressive accomplishment. Many impressive accomplishments are about essentially arbitrary things. It isn't substantially different than who can run the fastest mile, or get the most home-runs, or even be the first person to prove some theorem. Difficult accomplishments are impressive and interesting precisely because of the difficulty. Which ones we value and which ones are described as the sort of t

      • by ShakaUVM (157947)

        >>Seriously, this is an impressive accomplishment

        Is it? I can type significantly faster than 250 characters in a minute or two.

        If you allow qwerty keyboards, why not just plug a real keyboard into your phone and be done with it? I recall one of the "Top 10 most useless products from CES" to be such a thing for the iPhone.

        • by Pojut (1027544)

          I recall one of the "Top 10 most useless products from CES" to be such a thing for the iPhone.

          Not sure how that could be considered "useless"...I used to use something similar for my old Palm Pilot M100 back in the day to take notes in school (my handwriting skills have always been on a 1st grade level), and I found that to be extremely useful. It folded up small enough to fit in my back pocket, so carrying it between classes wasn't a big deal at all.

          I would imagine that, while a very niche product, a keyboard could be useful for business purposes with an iPhone for folks that don't want to bring t

          • by ShakaUVM (157947)

            It was useless because it could only enter text into its custom app, not in just any text field, as you'd imagine. =)

        • What am I missing. (Score:3, Interesting)

          by starbugs (1670420)

          Is it? I can type significantly faster than 250 characters in a minute or two.

          I don't get it. 264 characters? 1.59 seconds?
          Could the article be wrong, meaning words instead of characters?

          I just typed 298 characters in 2 minutes, 3 seconds (not counting time pressing the start-stop button on my watch).
          (3 wrong characters, 1 wrong space)
          Here's the text. (some of it I couldn't remember, so I made parts of it up, please don't laugh)

          THEORIZING THAT ONE COULD TIMETRAVEL WITHIN HIS OWN LIFETIME DOCTOR SAM BECKET STEPPED INTO THE TIME TRAVEL THINGIE AND VANISHED, HE AWOKE TO FIND HIMSELF TRA

          • by CecilPL (1258010)

            Yeah, I can't figure this out. I just typed your text on a crappy Nokia flip phone and did it in 2 minutes, 10 seconds. And that's with pauses while I read the next bit of the message.

            I rarely text either; that was almost a hunt-and-peck exercise for me. Obviously I'm not faster than the world record holder, but 264 words in 2 minutes is over 130 wpm. That's faster than nearly everyone can type on an actual keyboard, and there's no way you can type that fast with just thumbs.

            • Obviously I'm not faster than the world record holder, but 264 words in 2 minutes is over 130 wpm. That's faster than nearly everyone can type on an actual keyboard, and there's no way you can type that fast with just thumbs.

              It was 264 characters, not words.

              • by CecilPL (1258010)

                Sorry I wasn't clear. GGP made the point that 264 characters in 2 minutes is pretty slow, and I agree, given that we both seem to have just beaten it.

                However, the article couldn't have mistakenly meant to say "264 words" instead of "264 characters", since that's impossibly fast.

          • Is it? I can type significantly faster than 250 characters in a minute or two.

            I don't get it. 264 characters? 1.59 seconds?
            Could the article be wrong, meaning words instead of characters?

            I just typed 298 characters in 2 minutes, 3 seconds (not counting time pressing the start-stop button on my watch).
            (3 wrong characters, 1 wrong space)
            Here's the text. (some of it I couldn't remember, so I made parts of it up, please don't laugh)

            THEORIZING THAT ONE COULD TIMETRAVEL WITHIN HIS OWN LIFETIME DOCTOR SAM BECKET STEPPED INTO THE TIME TRAVEL THINGIE AND VANISHED, HE AWOKE TO FIND HIMSELF TRAPPED IN THE PAST, FACING MIRROR IMAGES THAT WERE NOT HIS OWN, AN D TRYING HIS BEST TO DO GOOD THINGS THAT IN THE BEND LEAD TO HIS DEMISE AND.

            So I copied the message from my Nokia Communicator onto a card, then onto my netbook, then I posted it here.

            Almost 300 characters in just over 2 minutes.
            And I rarely text. So there are lots of people who would beat me.

            So what am I missing here?

            Yeah, I just typed that phrase you posted in 1:06.959 including clicking the stopwatch. I was typing on my G1.

            WTH is up with that "record"? Maybe it was 264 words?

            my exact text copied and pasted from my phone is:

            "Theorizing that one could timetravel within his own lifetime doctor sam beckett stepped into the time treavel thingie and vanished, he awoke to find himself trapped in the past, facing mirror images that were not his own, and trying his best to do good things that in the bend lead to his demise and

        • What's wrong with QWERTY?

          • by ShakaUVM (157947)

            >>What's wrong with QWERTY?

            "Traditional" texting competitions made people text on the gimpy little cell phone pads, using either T9Word or having to whack one number key multiple times to cycle between letters. And they tend to make people text weird words so T9 mode doesn't work half the time, so you'd have to switch in and out of it. Using a qwerty keyboard means that the number of keypresses required would go down by about half or so. It's not really an apples-to-apples comparison that way.

      • by Gaffod (939100)

        Really? This is ridiculous. He can push some buttons very fast? Gimme a break. Running the mile involves a very strict diet and exercise regimen. I don't really care for sports, outside health-oriented exercise, but running the mile is NOT the same as typing very fast. It is as much an accomplishment as eating the most hotdogs.

        Also, your post has a logical fallacy. Assuming most accomplishments are arbitrary (I don't see why they would be, but whatever), so what? Most women you'd want to sleep with have two

  • by Volante3192 (953645) on Friday January 15, 2010 @04:22PM (#30784122)

    ... go into them kicking and screaming.

    Tron was denied a chance at the Best Effects oscar because AMPAS thought computers equated to cheating.

    Now find a movie that gets that award that *doesn't* use CGI.

    New tech makes old achievements irrelivant. Get used to it.

    • by OverlordQ (264228)

      New tech makes old achievements irrelivant. Get used to it.

      ORLY? [pirillo.com] I beg to differ.

      • by PitaBred (632671)

        Except that morse is a synchronous communication. Gotta have someone listening on the other end at the same time you're sending or it's useless.

      • by Domini (103836)

        Yes, really.

        Just because a single iteration of new technology is implemented badly, does not mean there is no progress in the field over older tech.

        The episode made Jay Leno look like a Luddite [wikipedia.org].

        The fact that a multi-tap [wikipedia.org] entry system was used in that contest, instead of predictive text [wikipedia.org] system as used in most phones for the longest time, renders that comparison flawed.

        I beat the morse-code guy at the time using a predictive text entry system (non-qwerty); and I was by no means particularly fast.

  • His record sadly fell 38 minutes later when 13 year old Samantha Johnson entered the competition.

    "Yeah, I was nervous entering the "Open" division, but my 10 year old brother competed in it last year and won, so I had confidence. The thing I'm the most proud of is winning the 12-14 age group, as everyone knows that's the toughest division to win." Before departing, Ms Johnson added "Old folks fail, amirite?"

    Back to you, Jeff.

  • we put QWERTY in your phone so you can set records while you commit social faux pas!
  • by Pojut (1027544)

    I can't RTFA at work due to filters...can anyone tell me if they are comparing the new record with a QWERTY to the old record with a numberpad? I have no problem with people using a QWERTY for a texting competition, but I think it's a bit unfair to compare it to the speed set by using a numberpad (again, if that's what they did)

    • by MBGMorden (803437)

      I gotta agree. That's like taking a dirt bike to the Tour De France and boasting about beating the world record.

      Query pads and number based pads are different beasts - if you're going to keep records, keep them in separate categories.

      • by MBGMorden (803437)

        Jeebus I can't believe I just typed Query instead of QWERTY. Sometimes the signals get crossed and the fingers type something other than what the mind sent.

      • by Pojut (1027544)

        The only way I would be ok with this is if they either split the competition into qwerty and non-qwerty (as you implied) or just get rid of numberpads.

        Personally, I think they should just have two seperate competitions...but honestly, I don't really care all that much :-)

    • by Zeussy (868062)
      If they used a phone with a qwerty keyboard, couldn't you just get a bluetooth keyboard, connect that to a compatible phone and type the txt on that?
  • Who cares? (Score:1, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward

    Some old guy with a Morse key can blow him away :-)

  • by dave562 (969951) on Friday January 15, 2010 @04:29PM (#30784224) Journal

    264 characters in two minutes? That's individual characters... 264 individual characters? 264 key presses in 2 minutes? That's about two key presses a second. Big deal?

    • by cptdondo (59460)

      Exactly. I can type 40 to 60 words per minute on a regular keyboard. In what way is 25 WPM considered progress?

      And the standard QWERTY keyboard was designed to slow typists down.

      I think it speaks loads to the crappy UI on phones and fairly screams for a new input paradigm. (I don't have one, mind you; I'm just an old dude who learned to type with all 10 fingers.)

      • by Dice (109560)

        And the standard QWERTY keyboard was designed to slow typists down.

        This is a myth [utdallas.edu].

        • by cptdondo (59460)

          I'm not arguing the supposed superiority of the DSK. Look up the history of the QWERTY layout - it was designed to place the most used keys far apart mechanically to lessen the incidence of jamming, and, as a side effect, slowed down the typists because of some awkward hand movements. If you ever typed on a mechanical keyboard, you know what I mean. Try typing a line on one; your fingers will cramp after a couple of sentences. It's a lot harder than on a computer keyboard.

          The fact is that we have learne

        • by CecilPL (1258010)

          Maybe, but your link reads like an apologist.

          Dvorak does have some significant advantages, imho, the most important of which to me is the reduced wrist and arm pain. Since switching I can type all day, every day, without any pain.

          It took close to a month of not being able to get anything done, but it's all rainbows and butterflies and ponies on this keyboard.

        • It is a nice story, but the assertions in the article are not supported with original work or referenced. Plus, lack of evidence does not debase a claim it only means it needs to be researched further.
    • by garcia (6573)

      I should have entered on my T-mobile Sidekick back before I switched to the iPhone. Using programmable shortcuts I was well over 100 WPM. I was probably in the 50 to 60 WPM if I had to use straight up typing.

      Aside from texting WRs being totally useless, I am even less impressed by this stat after hearing that it's done w/QWERTY.

  • Morse code is faster (Score:3, Informative)

    by Maximum Prophet (716608) on Friday January 15, 2010 @04:34PM (#30784306)
    That's only 22 5 character words (plus 1 character spaces). the Extra class amateur ham license requires 25 wpm, and some military Morse operators could do 60 wpm.

    My dad knew an operator that could buffer an entire line of text in his head before he started typing on a manual typewriter.
    • by Fnord666 (889225)
      There's an app for that called morse texter. It lets you enter morse code on your symbian phone for texting. You can get it here. [typepad.com]. It's the only way to fly now.
    • by batquux (323697) on Friday January 15, 2010 @04:48PM (#30784504)

      There is no longer a morse code requirement for any class of ham radio license.

      Still, folks who can do in the 30 wpm range are still more common than you might think.

    • You only have to pass 5 WPM now.

      CW (code) operation is still very popular with hams. It can get through when voice modes can't, and with lower power and simpler equipment.

      There are lots of operators today who can get above 30 WPM very comfortably and do so on a regular basis. The International code receiving record is still 77 WPM set my Ted McElroy back in the 1939. He was also the champ with American Morse (landline telegraph) and Japanese Kanjii code. Oh, and he could type 150 WPM on a manual type
      • In 1939, there was a ubiquitous text-sending technology (that, by the way, requires multiple keystrokes per letter unlike this new texting record-setter who used a QWERTY keyboard) and the best operator at the time could easily send text more than three times as fast as this new record-holder.

        Have I got this right?

        Harumph. These young whippersnappers, I swear, one of these days they're gonna be convinced they invented the orgasm.

        So how does this rate a Slashdot tag other than "NetNegativeTechProgress"?

    • Here's a video of a morse coder kicking the ass of top texter at the time:

      http://www.metacafe.com/watch/89338/morse_code_leno/ [metacafe.com]

    • World record, according to "The Art and Skill or Radio Telegraphy" [qsl.net] is 75.2wpm. "words" are 5 characters. This guy texted about 2.2 characters per second, the morse record is 6.3 characters per second.
  • When did Samzempus hack into ScuttleMonkey's account? I've yet to see any of the other moderators post inane idle crap in another section. I hope it's a one-off ScuttleMonkey. We don't need two Samzempuses on the site :(.

  • Using querty kbrd shld b banned. I typed ths msg in lss thn 30 sec on my qrt kbd

  • by Hatta (162192) on Friday January 15, 2010 @04:55PM (#30784592) Journal

    Engadget Mobile's very own Chris Ziegler led a silent protest during the awards ceremony

    So what then, did he vibrate?

  • Sadly enough, world-class texters don't have any more groupies than the rest of us pathetic computer nerds.

God may be subtle, but he isn't plain mean. -- Albert Einstein

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