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Facebook, Microsoft Team Up Against Google 297

Posted by Soulskill
from the pretty-soon-we-won't-have-to-talk-to-our-friends-at-all dept.
Pickens writes "In a move that could be the biggest threat to Google's search standing yet, Microsoft and Facebook announced that they're teaming up for social search. When someone uses Bing's search engine to look for a new car or a book, she can see which ones her friends liked. While industry watchers say this is an interesting move for search, what's most notable is that Facebook turned to Microsoft for this deal and not to the market leader, Google. Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg says there is a specific reason he wants to go with Bing: 'They really are the underdog here. They're incentivized to go out and innovate. They have all these smart people and are trying to do all these new things.' The real importance of this week's announcement is that it highlights the growing strategic conflict between Facebook and Google, says analyst Ray Valdes. 'There is a battle for the future of the Web, and it is not about search engines, but about the social Web.'"
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Facebook, Microsoft Team Up Against Google

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  • Plus. (Score:5, Insightful)

    by PsyciatricHelp (951182) on Friday October 15, 2010 @12:15PM (#33909104)
    Plus they gave me a bonus.
    • by Pojut (1027544)

      Damn your bonus. The divide between Google and Facebook is why the official Facebook app for Android is worth about as much as a lump of coal in place of a roll of toilet paper.

      I SAY GOOD DAY, SIR.

      • by Z00L00K (682162)

        Still makes me happy that I don't do Facebook, it seems like FB is one of the greatest threats to privacy these days. Governments use it to track their citizens etc.

        • Re: (Score:2, Offtopic)

          by Pojut (1027544)

          Just have to watch what you post. As I said in a story on here yesterday, I don't post anything (including status updates or pictures) I wouldn't want my mother or local police department to know about. I'm also pretty careful about what pictures I appear in, since I have no control what other people do with pictures they've taken.

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by poetmatt (793785)

      I don't think Microsoft has gotten to the "I'm going to go out of business" part yet, but they appear to be trying to speed it up with facebook.

      I wonder how much more they think they can buy marketshare before they fail?

      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by Hylandr (813770)
        They can team up all they want, it doesn't mean I will start using Bing. I am pretty sure Google is safe.

        Integrating Bing with the FB search function aught to be fairly entertaining.

        - Dan.
      • Re: (Score:2, Flamebait)

        by snowraver1 (1052510)
        Microsoft fail? Good luck with that. They cannot fail; too much of business depends on Windows desktop/servers. If push came to shove, they would get bailout money. Not that they are anywhere close to neededing it....

        Why is the parent modded informative? Oh because we hate Microsoft here....
        • by nschubach (922175)

          Why is the parent modded informative? Oh because we hate Microsoft here....

          Why post the question you already know the answer too? Damnit, I just did it too!

      • Re:Plus. (Score:4, Informative)

        by Nikker (749551) on Friday October 15, 2010 @02:16PM (#33910734)
        I wonder if anyone here remembers who gave good ole FaceBook their legitimacy in 2007 as a multi-million dollar company [facebook.com]they have already paid for Zucker mine as well collect.
    • Reminds me of this comic [penny-arcade.com] about why games went XBOX exclusive.
  • Google - Diaspora (Score:5, Insightful)

    by SoTerrified (660807) on Friday October 15, 2010 @12:17PM (#33909122)

    So is this a deliberate attempt for Facebook to allocate resources towards Diaspora? Are they deliberately fueling the two headed monster that will replace them?

  • Oh dear... (Score:3, Interesting)

    by ocularsinister (774024) on Friday October 15, 2010 @12:18PM (#33909164)
    I really am regretting ever creating a Facebook account. If things carry on in this direction, I shall delete the thing soon.
    • by Anonymous Coward on Friday October 15, 2010 @12:20PM (#33909180)
      ...I shall delete the thing soon.

      That's what you think.

      Regards,
      Mark Z.
      • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

        by pspahn (1175617)

        Getting rid of this stuff [youtube.com] takes digitular fortitude.

      • Yeah, your in for a Chinese puzzle trying to delete your facebook account. This is why when ever I take a social media app for a test run I create my account with totally bogus, useless information other than an email account I use only for non-professional friends. Good luck with that.
    • Re:Oh dear... (Score:5, Insightful)

      by causality (777677) on Friday October 15, 2010 @12:58PM (#33909706)

      I really am regretting ever creating a Facebook account. If things carry on in this direction, I shall delete the thing soon.

      Those of us who found serious problems (mainly privacy-related) with Facebook from the very beginning, decided not to participate at all, and said so, tended to catch some flak for it. As in, something other than a well-reasoned rebuttal to the position. Usually this was in the form of someone's personal offense that I would point out a flaw in their favorite new service, or that I would steadfastly value the privacy they seem to have given up on.

      "If things carry on in this direction" indeed. I think this is like many political proposals. People tend to look at short-term effects without considering that these represent movement in a particular direction. The path that the momentum is taking can be identified early on and the destination can be known long before the end of that path is reached. It is something of a law of nature that events tend to unfold, to evolve, to become more so, to continue along their current direction in a straight line unless some counter-force alters that path. The longer something goes on the more inertia it accumulates; the more inertia it has the greater that counter-force (or backlash) must be to have any effect.

      I for one identified early on that Facebook and similar sites appeal to a form of vanity I do not personally possess. Even if I did find that tempting, vanity is not a rational reason to participate in something. They do this while coming with disadvantages I find unacceptable, such as the loss of control over any personal information posted there (read their privacy policies, they make this quite clear) and the extensive use of personal information for tracking and marketing purposes. As another poster has pointed out in reply to you, you have no real assurance that your account is ever truly deleted even after going through a needlessly complex process to request that this be done.

      The pattern here is a valuable one to recognize and simplicity itself. When many proponents of something display that kind of denigrating personal offense when you question the purpose or usefulness of that thing, and resent that you question it rationally at all, it should be a red flag. I've rarely or never seen anyone do that when the object in question is an inherently good or useful thing that can stand on its own merits. The regret you express can be described as a lesson about popularity, trend, and bandwagon appeal and the unwarranted power these can have over your decision-making. To be sure, it is a valuable one.

      • Re:Oh dear... (Score:5, Interesting)

        by Jah-Wren Ryel (80510) on Friday October 15, 2010 @01:19PM (#33910036)

        I for one identified early on that Facebook and similar sites appeal to a form of vanity I do not personally possess.
        Even if I did find that tempting, vanity is not a rational reason to participate in something.

        Perhaps the reason you caught flak was really for such a snooty attitude.

        While narcissism may be a motivator for some users of facebook, it can hardly be said that vanity is the draw.
        The ability to easily connect (and reconnect) with friends present and past is quite valuable to most regular people.
        The price may be too high and too hidden, but that doesn't make the value provided any less meaningless.

      • The pattern here is a valuable one to recognize and simplicity itself. When many proponents of something display that kind of denigrating personal offense when you question the purpose or usefulness of that thing, and resent that you question it rationally at all, it should be a red flag. I've rarely or never seen anyone do that when the object in question is an inherently good or useful thing that can stand on its own merits. The regret you express can be described as a lesson about popularity, trend, and

    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by srussia (884021)

      I really am regretting ever creating a Facebook account. If things carry on in this direction, I shall delete the thing soon.

      The number one search hint when entering "dele" into the Google toolbar is "delete facebook account". Coincidence?

    • I really am regretting ever creating a Facebook account. If things carry on in this direction, I shall delete the thing soon.

      I just want to say that I hated Facebookbefore it was cool to hate Facebook. All the rest of you are just 'Johnny come hate-lys'.....
  • by Dystopian Rebel (714995) * on Friday October 15, 2010 @12:19PM (#33909174) Journal

    There is a battle for the future of the Web, and it is not about search engines, but about the social Web

    There is a battle for the future of people's *privacy*. On one side, ordinary people. On the other side, spooks and profiteers who tell us that "privacy doesn't matter".

    • You left out the hordes of people who don't care about their privacy any more. I've been watching with mouth agape as we're all treating Total Information Awareness as a "feature".

    • by Sarten-X (1102295) on Friday October 15, 2010 @12:54PM (#33909660) Homepage

      ...And on the other other side, people like me, who know that a certain amount of privacy is actually useful, and a certain amount of personally-identifiable information is perfectly fine to give away without worrying about consequences. It takes some effort to maintain separate sets of public vs. private information, but it's possible to keep them separate.

    • by Ephemeriis (315124) on Friday October 15, 2010 @12:57PM (#33909694)

      There is a battle for the future of the Web, and it is not about search engines, but about the social Web

      There is a battle for the future of people's *privacy*. On one side, ordinary people. On the other side, spooks and profiteers who tell us that "privacy doesn't matter".

      That is not where I would have drawn the line...

      I would have said we had ordinary people on one side, and paranoid privacy geeks on the other side.

      I'm not going to say that "privacy doesn't matter"... But our idea of privacy is a fairly modern invention. Move out to a small town and you'll quickly see what a lack of privacy really is. Everybody knows what everybody else is doing. Doesn't matter if you're on Facebook or not. It's just the relatively recent migration to large cities where you can get lost in the crowd that has created this idea of privacy.

      Which isn't a bad thing. I like my privacy, personally.

      But it isn't like Facebook/Google/Bing/Big Brother/whatever are eroding this ancient and mighty establishment called "privacy".

      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by iamhigh (1252742)
        Except that in that little town, you have to drive past my house to see my status. You have to spend a few hours BSing with locals to find out the gossip. It takes WORK to invade privacy. That work has been reduced thanks to the same technology that has reduced the work of communication and interacting with others.

        A city gives privacy through a type of anonymity. A rural town give privacy through difficutly to obtain and spread information and the difficulty in retaining said information with accurac
    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by gstewart (453924)

      And Facebook recently "upgraded" their security settings to supposedly "tighten" the privacy configuration on user profiles... Are they going to add a security setting that let's me choose to have my profile information and photos *excluded* from the Bing searches? I should hope so.

      I have a hard enough time yelling at my 'friends' not to copy and repost my photos without proper security on their own profiles, and have partly resorted to watermarking all my images with my copyright to help tell people whose

    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by SudoGhost (1779150)
      On one side, computer nerds, not ordinary people. On the other side, spooks and profiteers who tell us that "privacy doesn't matter". In the middle are the people who like farms and mafias and whatnot.

      If more people know/cared about their privacy being constantly probed, there would be more of an uproar, and it wouldn't be as profitable to gather such information. But most people don't understand how it works.
  • "Social Web" is... (Score:2, Insightful)

    by grepya (67436)

    ...the "Push" of this decade.

  • I'm not sure why I would want this feature. What are the advantages? Would I not have already sought out my "expert" friends for their opinions? Then again, I hate the like features of Facebook. It's the least "social" gesture one can make.
  • by jonescb (1888008) on Friday October 15, 2010 @12:21PM (#33909204)
    This seems like one of those things that sounds like a cool idea but never takes off. Most people probably aren't hugely interested in seeing which cars their friends recommend. I think most people are still in the mindset that if they want someone's opinion on something they'll ask them directly. Maybe there are some interesting uses for this, but the cars example in the summary seems pretty bland.
    • I, for one, think this idea sounds like one of those "sounded good at the time" things that happen when to drunken executives meet at a cocktail party. "let's leverage our synergies in marketing and social networking to make a web 2.0 customer driven blah blah blah."
    • by omnichad (1198475)

      Except for teens whose self-esteem comes from buying things that their peers like rather than developing their own fashion sense or opinion just yet. This is where the money is.

    • by mclearn (86140)
      I feel that you may be underestimating the power of the social search. By definition, Facebook exists because people *want* to be connected to each other. Social gaming platforms push the latest details of someone's accomplishments, people are constantly being invited (or otherwise [slashdot.org]) to groups they may have an interest in. Basically, any social context is now at the mercy of crowd-wisdom. I think social search is going to enable more of this behaviour, and I think if you dismiss it so easily, you just don'
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by JaredOfEuropa (526365)
      Actually, they might... the key is what the word "friend" means on the social web, and what context surrounds the friendship relation.

      When adding tags to your friends (already possible on Facebook using "friends lists"), you are providing that context. The search engine can use that to figure out which of your friends would have something relevant to say about whatever it is you are looking for.

      Sure, you can ask your friends for their opinion directly. Your real friends. But on the social web (what's
  • From the summary: "When someone uses Bing's search engine to look for a new car or a book, she can see which ones her friends liked."

    Only she? So if a "he" searches it doesn't work?
    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by Nadaka (224565)

      It does, but he wont make a decision based on what other people think is cute.

    • Since there are no (accepted) English gender neutral pronouns for people and because saying he or she every time is tedious, many publications just switch back and forth through multiple examples to demonstrate that they aren't sexists. Wizards of the Coast does this in their books, they'll do Example A using all female pronouns and then do Example B using all male back and forth throughout the books.
    • by boristdog (133725)

      'Cause chicks are more influenced by what other people say is cool.
      See: Fashion.

  • Bing's search engine to look for a new car or a book, she can see which ones her friends liked.

    Does that mean MS has privileged access to facebook data? As in if your facebook 'friends' only disclose that information to 'friends' and not the entire world MS can still see it in order to catalog it (and do who knows what else with it)?

    • by kent_eh (543303)
      Yet another reason for me not to start using either Facebook or Bing.
      • by Nadaka (224565)

        I only started using facebook when I got rid of my ex and realized I had been dragged down for so long that I didn't have a reliable way of getting in contact with of all my friends.

  • by Quato (132194) on Friday October 15, 2010 @12:25PM (#33909286)

    I can see it now.... I'll be shopping at Walgreens.com and there will be popups on that say what kind of Hemorrhoid cream my boss uses, and that my Aunt Grace just bought a some warming KY-Jelly.

    Some things need to stay private.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Friday October 15, 2010 @12:25PM (#33909288)

    Microsoft have a habit of fatally betraying any company they "partner" up with. I couldn't have picked a better candidate for such a fate!

  • Oh, she says, well, you're not a poor man. You know, why don't you go online and buy a hundred envelopes and put them in the closet? And so I pretend not to hear her. And go out to get an envelope because I'm going to have a hell of a good time in the process of buying one envelope. I meet a lot of people. And, see some great looking babes. And a fire engine goes by. And I give them the thumbs up. And, and ask a woman what kind of dog that is. And, and I don't know. The moral of the story is, is we're here

  • by nimbius (983462) on Friday October 15, 2010 @12:27PM (#33909306) Homepage
    incentivized to go out and innovate??? Someone forgot this Bing technology which microsoft has innovated so greatly is mostly just yahoo under the hood. based on the core technology alone, one could surmise they dont have many intelligent folks working long hours on this. I suspect the real reason was a nice, greasy palm full of cash from microsoft.

    as for the social web i could take it or leave it, mark. People forget the original "social web" was IRC and usenet. All you've offered arguably is a clever sand box for market research and a communications system that doesn't challenge anyone to engage in a real conversation.
  • PR Translation (Score:5, Insightful)

    by c (8461) <beauregardcp@gmail.com> on Friday October 15, 2010 @12:30PM (#33909352)

    They really are the underdog here.

    "Their search engine sucks."

    They're incentivized to go out and innovate.

    "They gave us a lot of money"

    They have all these smart people and are trying
    to do all these new things.

    "They're rich and desperate. Ka-ching!"

  • Granpa Google (Score:5, Interesting)

    by dasdrewid (653176) on Friday October 15, 2010 @12:31PM (#33909358)

    They're incentivized to go out and innovate. They have all these smart people and are trying to do all these new things.

    I mean, jeez, yeah. The last thing I heard about Google doing was building cars that drive themselves in traffic. That's sooo mid-2000s... Facebing is looking to the future here! Those 500 people that I once knew in HS and college that I haven't talked to in 3+ years and that every time I do I'm reminded of why I don't talk to them (nothing in common, completely antithetical views on most things, too many freaking country-club-kiddies who don't know the difference between Bing and Best Buy)? Those are *definitely* the people who's likes I want showing up first in my search engine results!

    Now, to be fair, Microsoft does actually have some pretty sweet research going on. And while most of that research is in things pretty unrelated to search, a lot of Google's research is also pretty unrelated to search. But to say that you're going with Bing over Google because Bing is "incentivized to innovate" sounds like that phrase had it's own paragraph in the contract, right above where the $ was followed by a dozen "0"s.

    Hey, gotta pay for the Newark school system somehow, right?

  • Botnets anyone? (Score:3, Insightful)

    by savvysteve (1915898) on Friday October 15, 2010 @12:31PM (#33909362)
    The idea of Facebook and Microsoft teaming up together is very scary. Two companies riddled with security flaws... Those running the botnets are smiling from ear to ear because they see more victims.
  • Lemmings (Score:5, Insightful)

    by PPH (736903) on Friday October 15, 2010 @12:34PM (#33909404)

    When someone uses Bing's search engine to look for a new car or a book, she can see which ones her friends liked.

    And with a map interface, we can all see which cliff all the other rodents are leaping off today.

  • Not that anyone here has fallen victim to the waste of time that is facebook. Rather this is just a vehicle for me to say:

    "Hey, you got your waste of time website in my crappy OS! Well, you got your crappy OS all over my useless marketing engine disguised as a "social web tool" Mmmmm, two shitty tastes that taste even shittier together! Reese's Social Net-Hype Cups! Now with extra marketing!"

    Great! Now I can pretend to stay connected to people I would not bother to see in real life, all with tons of ad

  • Translation: (Score:5, Interesting)

    by Todd Knarr (15451) on Friday October 15, 2010 @12:34PM (#33909412) Homepage

    Translation of Zuckerberg's comments: "Microsoft has loads of cash, and they're willing to cut me an insanely good deal and throw money my way if it's got any chance of giving them a leg up on Google.".

  • by Zarf (5735) on Friday October 15, 2010 @12:35PM (#33909418) Journal

    Go and slay Grendel! You can do it! Imma stay here behind this fortress of GPL. KTHXBAI.

  • by 93 Escort Wagon (326346) on Friday October 15, 2010 @12:35PM (#33909422)

    If I care about my friends' opinions on a particular topic, I ask them about it.

    This is just so silly - doubly so, given the typical Facebook user's definition of "friend". Tell me, if you're doing a search - do you honestly care what random "Facebook Friend" Joe Schmoe, who you last met 20 years ago in daycare, liked or didn't like?

  • by Anonymous Showered (1443719) on Friday October 15, 2010 @12:35PM (#33909428)

    Google's working on cars that drive by themselves.

    What the fuck is Microsoft innovating?

    Facebook is just a fad...

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by PatPending (953482)
      I get your meaning and agree with you. However I want to point out that MS has a great number (thousands?) of patents and they have MS Research. And yet with all this they are still encumbered with maintaining the status quo in every s/w and h/w product they make. I'm inclined to guess they use 98% of their resources for perpetuating/maintaining their existing products and 2% on innovation while Google is probably 50/50.
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by 1000101 (584896)
      Research Home [microsoft.com]
      Research Areas [microsoft.com]

      I have no idea if they are working on cars that will drive themselves and they don't advertise their 'Labs' as well as Google, but there is plenty of research going on at Microsoft. I know there are plenty of people who HATE all things Microsoft, but there are some really talented people working on really interesting things over there.
  • Recipe for disaster (Score:3, Interesting)

    by gmuslera (3436) on Friday October 15, 2010 @12:37PM (#33909454) Homepage Journal
    So it will suggest you things that your friends (not some anonymous person) like? Disclosing private things from unknown people is pretty bad already, but if start to disclose private things of people in your circle ("would you like to buy inflatable dolls like your friend Frank?" to put an easy example) could mean troubles for both Microsoft, Facebook, and all their users.
    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by omnichad (1198475)

      If it's based on "like"-ing a product or brand, then that's already public to your circle of friends. Where is the spot in Facebook where I tell it my deep dark secrets that I don't want to be shared with anyone?

      • by gmuslera (3436)
        One thing is announcing to the world that you like something, and another searching for/buying/following links.
  • by drewhk (1744562) on Friday October 15, 2010 @12:39PM (#33909486)

    And new infection vectors for trojans...

    "[blink]You are infected!!! [/blink] Your friend recommends this virus scanner".

  • by Chapter80 (926879) on Friday October 15, 2010 @12:41PM (#33909506)

    I am determined to be the last person on the planet to sign up for Facebook. I hate the concept and I hate the leader.

    That said, I think there's one feature that might sway me.

    I use Yahoo IM extensively. I love it. I use it on my phone and on my PC. It's relatively anonymous, friends don't know who your other friends are, it's exactly what I am looking for, in a person-to-person communication program.

    I know Facebook has a mobile product and a chat product, and, from what I have read, a very complex way of setting up groups of your friends. But is there ANYTHING like "I just want to sign up for facebook to be able to communicate with a few friends, person-to-person via Instant messages. I don't want some wall-shit that people are going to write on. I don't want to share my photos, or my status. I just want to be able to send IM's. And I want it to be SIMPLE to just sign up and do JUST that. With relative anonymity. Without telling each friend who else I am friends with."

    Do they have anything like that?

    • by omnichad (1198475)

      Set up your own XMPP Server [igniterealtime.org] and give your friends a login. Tell them they can use a program like Pidgin to login, and then tell them they can also use Pidgin to be signed into Facebook Chat at the same time. If you're lucky? They might bite as long as you're on the hook to show them how to set up Facebook Chat on it too.

    • by geekoid (135745)

      Why do you hate the concept? What is wrong with people communicating? Yeah, some people post inane things, but you dont have to follow those people.
      It's an easy way to stay connected and to know what people I am interested in are doing.

      You'rs just a luddite.

    • Friends are deemed public knowledge on FB and can't be hidden IIRC.

    • by hodet (620484)
      Just lock it down. Don't allow anyone to post on your wall, hide all your personal info, or better yet don't list every damn aspect of your life. Don't post photos. Send private messages to friends instead of plastering it on their wall. Just make sure you go back in often to check your settings because who knows when the latest and greatest feature will be added and you allow it by default. If you do have a couple of friends you would like to share more with just group them together and open up speci
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by takowl (905807)

      I just want to be able to send IM's.

      So you're using an IM network. Good for you. There are already plenty of them. Facebook doesn't need to be another one.

      Many people like social networks. They like "wall-shit that people are going to write on". They want to share photos. They want to do status updates. Facebook has been very successful catering to that. It's not obliged to become an IM network just because you don't like social networks.

      Why does /. hate social networks so much? Whenever there's a thread on FB or twitter, the responses are a

      • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

        by Chapter80 (926879)

        No, Facebook doesn't need to be an IM network and I don't need to be on Facebook. If you like it, I have no problem with that. I was just stating the only reason I could imagine that I might sign up.

        See my earlier response why I hate it [slashdot.org], since you asked...

  • It might work (Score:4, Interesting)

    by hey (83763) on Friday October 15, 2010 @12:45PM (#33909570) Journal

    To most of us this sounds abhorrent but it might be commercially successful anyhow.
    However, it seems a bit like the Kin... they are betting the phone's entire success on one app (or group of apps) - social.
    I think Android and iPhone are successful because they are just platforms to run any kind of app... the users decide what they want.

  • by think_nix (1467471) on Friday October 15, 2010 @12:47PM (#33909588)

    Honestly , now to do a _bing_ search I have to log into a facebook account or how is this suppose to work? Also what about privacy issues ? XSS attacks ? How is this anonymously allowing me to search and bettering my privacy at the same time ?

  • The real reason (Score:4, Insightful)

    by C_Kode (102755) on Friday October 15, 2010 @12:52PM (#33909634) Journal

    The real reason is because both Microsoft and Facebook see eye-to-eye when it comes to user security. ;)

    Both eyes are blind.

  • by formfeed (703859) on Friday October 15, 2010 @12:52PM (#33909636)
    Enough people are worried already about Google knowing to much. For Google, it really wouldn't help to get tainted by a cooperation with Zuckerberg, the poster-child of give-a-damn about privacy.

    Microsoft's business strategy "be evil" [geekculture.com] seems a much better fit for Facebook.

  • by Flipao (903929) on Friday October 15, 2010 @12:56PM (#33909684)
    All the while Apple keep sneaking up on them, it'd be so ironic if Steve Jobs turned the tables on them some 30odd years later.
  • Uncle_Bob uses Painbegone hemorrhoid cream.

    Linda recommends Powermax personal massager

    Thanks Bing, but no thanks.

  • Delete all your likes and interests from your profile. E.g. favorite tv-shows, books etc. As these are what bing would like to search for.
     

  • by brunes69 (86786) <slashdot@keirstea d . o rg> on Friday October 15, 2010 @02:23PM (#33910822) Homepage

    Surprised this article and /. summary is so poorly researched. (Then again this is /. what can I expect?)

    Microsoft is very heavily invested in Facebook.

    They put 240 million dollars into it years ago, they own a substantial stake in the company.

    They very likely have one or more key members on the board, and of course would be heavily against any involvement by Google, who is their top competitor.

  • by jamrock (863246) on Friday October 15, 2010 @02:24PM (#33910832)
    After a function in Washington D.C. which was attended by former presidents Carter, Ford, and Nixon, then-Senator Bob Dole famously quipped, "Last night Washington was treated to the presence of three former inhabitants of the White House: See No Evil, Hear No Evil, and Evil."

    I can't help but feel that he could have been describing Google, Facebook and Microsoft: Don't Be Evil, Privacy is Evil, and Evil.
  • by Dan667 (564390) on Friday October 15, 2010 @04:08PM (#33912168)
    Oh wait, that did not turn out so well.

Man must shape his tools lest they shape him. -- Arthur R. Miller

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