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Using Technology To Enforce Good Behavior 249

Posted by Soulskill
from the hey-it-works-for-dogs dept.
Ismellpoop writes "With the new year upon us and resolutions being made to change unwanted behavior, many tools are now available to help people stay in line, such as a GPS-enabled app that locks down texting once a car gets rolling and a program that cuts off credit-card spending. Another device monitors your workout and offers real-time voice feedback. Have we entered an era in which electronics serve as mother, cop and coach because we can't manage our own desires?"
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Using Technology To Enforce Good Behavior

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  • by h4rr4r (612664) on Monday January 03, 2011 @04:27PM (#34747064)

    How is this any different than my alarm clock?

    Is it my mother because it wakes me?

    • by click2005 (921437) * on Monday January 03, 2011 @04:34PM (#34747126)

      Why not just fit everyone with a V-chip. If they have impure/illegal/un-patriotic/ thoughts they get a shock.

      • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

        by spun (1352)

        Why not just fit everyone with a V-chip. If they have impure/illegal/un-patriotic/ thoughts they get a shock.

        AT least then we will all have the means to send Saddam back to hell if he ever escapes.

      • by Yvan256 (722131)

        Fry: Jeez, doesn't that shock collar hurt?
        Leela: Actually, feels kind of good. I guess I'm starting to associate it with the pleasure of beating people up.

      • by Locke2005 (849178)
        You have committed a double-plus ungood crimethink. Please report immediately to the Ministry of Love for reeducation.
      • Now that would make me quite pissed off.

        What, I can't say pissed off?

        OWWWWWWWWWWW!

      • This would be a very unwise thing to do. Putting such a chip in everyone would be very expensive. We'll need to wait for the price to go down a bit first.
    • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

      by Anonymous Coward

      Is it my mother because it wakes me?

      Only if you dream of having sex with it

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by fearlezz (594718)

      It is your mother if the manufacturer programmed it to go off every day at 7.00, even if you don't have school/work.

      Your alarm clock goes off because YOU instructed it to. Not because someone else is enforcing their habits and/or rules on you.

      • It is your mother if the manufacturer programmed it to go off every day at 7.00, even if you don't have school/work.

        Your alarm clock goes off because YOU instructed it to. Not because someone else is enforcing their habits and/or rules on you.

        From TFA these devices/apps/programs are all voluntary. Well, I guess buying the 7:00AM alarm clock would be too, so nevermind.

      • My alarm clock:
        # M H dom mo dow
        35 06 * * 1-5 mainuser play /home/mainuser/kirbytheme.wav 2>/dev/null
      • by gparent (1242548)
        Same with everything else mentioned in the summary, I'd assume. Your point?
    • by Anonymous Coward on Monday January 03, 2011 @04:56PM (#34747352)

      What is this 'alarm clock' app you speak of? The iPhone doesn't appear to have such a thing.

    • by bjdevil66 (583941)
      It's not different as long as the other technologies also come with the equivalent of a snooze bar or an off switch...
    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward

      The difference is the purpose. When I am sleeping I don't know what time it is, the alarm clock is there to notify me when I should wake up. In the case of these programs, the person knows they should or shouldn't be doing something. If a person is driving down the freeway they know they shouldn't be texting on a cell phone. The only reason they would download this program is if they lack the will power to not send text messages.

      It would be the same as buying an alarm clock without a snooze button becau

    • How is this any different than my alarm clock?

      Is it my mother because it wakes me?

      The difference is that if taken to an extreme we'll develop a society where everything's okay to do until you're physically prevented from doing it. (If you've ever paid attention to all the frivolous lawsuits filed in the last two decades, you can already see this happening.)

      Here's a scenario: Imagine in the not too distant future it becomes a standard feature of cell phones to automatically go silent when in a theater. Pretty soon restaurants start silencing phones because people get extra noisy in the

  • by Seumas (6865) on Monday January 03, 2011 @04:29PM (#34747092)

    Have we entered an era in which electronics serve as mother, cop and coach because we can't manage our own desires?

    If you're the one setting up these utilities for yourself, then you are managing your own desires.

    • I refuse to let anyone tell me what to do, especially past-me. Who does that fucker think he was, making decisions for me? When he told our wife "I'll pick up groceries on the way home," did he have any idea how tired I would be after work? No, and he didn't care, because it's not him picking up the groceries, he is gone, he is only a shadow of the past, and I am the one who has to pick up the groceries. Well, fuck it. It's not like I'm hungry now. If future me gets hungry, he can get his own damn food. But knowing him, he'll blame me for not getting it for him now, the sanctimonious prick.

      • by hansraj (458504)

        Ahahahaha.. man, you killed me!

        • by rezalas (1227518)
          No his past self killed you and my past self commented about it. Unfortunately this excuse doesn't work in court.
      • I refuse to let anyone tell me what to do, especially past-me. Who does that fucker think he was, making decisions for me? When he told our wife "I'll pick up groceries on the way home," did he have any idea how tired I would be after work? No, and he didn't care, because it's not him picking up the groceries, he is gone, he is only a shadow of the past, and I am the one who has to pick up the groceries. Well, fuck it. It's not like I'm hungry now. If future me gets hungry, he can get his own damn food. But knowing him, he'll blame me for not getting it for him now, the sanctimonious prick.

        Bastard ate my emergency donut, too.

        • by hansraj (458504)

          Just that?

          My past-me was clogging the internet posting lame "Ahahahaha.. man; you killed me!" comments.

          So actually, my past-me ate parts of everyone's donuts!

    • by cosm (1072588)
      That can be a grey area though,

      If I input my physiological information et al. into a health management program that plans my different foodstuffs intakes, am I managing my desires when I only eat what the software tells me? What if I was only allowed the food that the software determined, and was physically incapable (or restrained) from eating food not specified by the software? How far off do we think this future really is, 10, 15, maybe 30 yrs?

      As we march towards the singularity (the one in which te
      • We're at the point of non-survival already. Without modern technology, it would be impossible to produce enough food and many communities would be without enough water. If something happened tomorrow to wipe out just electricity and the mechanised engine, I imagine well over half the population of the world would be dead in five years. Humanity would survive, but the losses would be harsh, and numbers could never recover without the return of those technologies.
      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by Seumas (6865)

        No, if you're utilizing an application to determine your diet and you eat accordingly, you're choosing to make use of tools likely developed by those who have spent their life specializing in something (nutrition, dietary needs, etc) that you likely have not and therefore have accepted the benefit of their expertise through the piece of software. The same way I use a piece of software to help me file my taxes every year, because I am a software engineer and not an economist or tax advisor or a CPA.

        Of course

    • Yes, this is more like "Using technology to break bad habits". With apologies to Chris Rock, ain't nothing wrong with that!
    • by poetmatt (793785)

      people were able to manage their own desires previously. This is just another tool for it. Doesn't mean it works, though.

    • by nospam007 (722110)

      I already have it by setting my ringtone to:
      "Bad boy, bad boy, whatchou gonna do if they come for you"

    • by Yetihehe (971185)
      This way no-texting-while-driving app becomes self-control prosthesis. Just like post-it's are memory prostheses.
  • Flamebait summary (Score:4, Insightful)

    by mcgrew (92797) * on Monday January 03, 2011 @04:30PM (#34747098) Homepage Journal

    Have we entered an era in which electronics serve as mother, cop and coach because we can't manage our own desires?"

    Poppycock. These technologies aren't for government, aren't for ME keeping YOU from texting; they're tools for helping you help yourself.

    Here's one not covered in TFA -- your alarm clock. Don't have the discipline to go to bed early enough to get to work on time? Set this handy little gadget and it will wake you up in the morning, just like your mom used to do.

  • back in late 90ies... with the huge GPS "dongle" mind you.

    This Mountain Dew moment brought to you by me.

  • by gr8_phk (621180) on Monday January 03, 2011 @04:32PM (#34747116)
    I have a device that cuts off credit card spending - scissors.
    • by Dunega (901960)
      For all of those who have memorized their credit card information, you can also use the scissors to gouge your eyes out. That will make it much more difficult to find the place on the screen to type that information in!
  • Have we entered an era in which electronics serve as mother, cop and coach because we can't manage our own desires?

    Flamebait question. Computers? Being used to automate things? STOP THE PRESSES!

  • My BMI is just a little higher than the value my company's insurance policy requires, so I am going to be required to carry a digital pedometer and record a minimum number of steps per month in order to get the same insurance at the same rate that someone who weighs 20 pounds less would get.

    • by Abstrackt (609015)
      Yikes, I hope you're not serious. But in case you are, just put that pedometer in a paint mixer for a few minutes.
      • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

        by Anonymous Coward
        So now, apparently, he's overweight and prone to seizures.
        • by Abstrackt (609015)
          But he walks about 50,000 steps a day!
          • by Obfuscant (592200)
            But he walks about 50,000 steps a day!

            They won't be able to download the data from the pedometer because the damn micro-USB connector will be clogged with paint!

    • by mcgrew (92797) *

      At least these days we know about BMI. When I was in the USAF in the early '70s, they were having a fit about obesity. During basic training if you weighed too much, they put you in the "fat boys squadron", and you doubletimed everywhere, and had a strict diet (there was actually an armed guard by the milk machine any time the fat boys were in the mess hall).

      I was stationed with a career man (he'd been there for 8 years alreadY) who was a weight lifter. This guy looked like Governor Arnold; he probably didn

    • by Gordonjcp (186804)

      Is that even legal? The BMI is an utterly discredited measure of health. Comparing someone's height and weight is in no way meaningful, since it assumes that any extra weight you're carrying is fat. My BMI puts me squarely into "obese" territory, despite not even being particularly fat (1.86m, 100kg, or to translate into American units 6' and 220lbs) - but I'd like to see how many "normal" BMI, low-fat, no-carbs, no-caffeine, no-gluten skinny freaks can carry a 10m scaffolding pole up 24 floor's worth of

      • BMI is used because it's convenient. There are better measures, but they need specialised equipment or extensive time-consuming measurements by someone with special training. All you need to determine BMI are scales and a stick with height markings.
  • by eepok (545733) on Monday January 03, 2011 @04:37PM (#34747164) Homepage

    We can and do manage our behavior, but we also like to have some sort of silver-bullet placebo. It's the only way some people can convince themselves that there will be results for some exertion of effort.

    It's particularly bad, though, when we make major purchases under the pretense that we will guilt ourselves into conforming to a regiment or else risk wasting a significant investment. Bikes, gym memberships, new running shoes, etc -- these are all things that most people buy as a means to shift a desire from second level (I want to want to...) to first level (I want to...).

    In the end, people just stop using those crutches (for the most part) and recede to prior, bad habits.

    • This reminds me of a couple of tech crutch ideas I've had in the past:

      Timed padlock for sweets: Has multi-day delay before it can be opened again. Padlock is sufficiently expensive that one wouldn't want to break it to get a few dollars' worth of chocolate inside box locked with it. This way lock doesn't have to be metal; could be plastic.

      Clock for people who set their clock ahead, but then mentally adjust time and so are late anyway: Time displayed by clock is always ahead, but by a random amount whi

      • by eepok (545733)

        I would actually pay for both of those devices. Not for myself, but for my S/O who, of all things, lacks "will" and "drive" for most things in life. She's the kind of person who would buy the silver-bullet placebos I described without fail.

        She took up knitting and invested in a massive amount of yarn (high quality stuff on bargain when she could find it) with the assumption that the investment will guilt her into using it. I'm pretty sure she's quit 80% of her attempted projects since her start.

        I'm pretty s

  • I understand that driving is a privilege and therefore you give up certain rights when driving. In MA it's illegal to text and drive, don't know how they would actually enforce such a law. I cannot imagine a scenario where it would be illegal for a passenger in a vehicle to do anything with their phone they wanted to. It doesn't sound like this technology is going to differentiate between a driver and a passenger just if the vehicle is moving or not, sounds pretty lame to me!

    I don't think technology can

    • As a resident of MA, I will say that though I completely support the concept of banning texting while driving, the current law is useless. Even local cops urged the State government to slow down and think, because now they are obligated to enforce an unenforceable law.

      "Texting" is illegal. But other phone functions like talking, dialing, or using GPS Nav applications are still legally ok. This makes it functionally impossible to enforce.

      • Sorry, Officer, but I was *not* texting. I'm blogging with the Wordpress app on my Android phone, and live-tweeting status updates to my followers. Twitter couldn't geolocate me because my Epic4G's GPS was borked by Samsung & Sprint. I accidentally swerved across the middle lane and almost hit the old lady on a scooter because I had to disable 4G so Sprint's firewall won't block the GPS ephemera download, dial *#1472365# to get the phone in debug mode, forcibly flush the cache, launch the diagnostics, w

      • by Obfuscant (592200)
        "Texting" is illegal. But other phone functions like talking, dialing, or using GPS Nav applications are still legally ok. This makes it functionally impossible to enforce.

        In Oregon it is illegal to use a cell phone while driving, with limited exceptions. The law actually refers to mobile two-way communications devices and thus includes two-way radios, but contains exemptions for amateur radio, CB, and fire/police. It was quite a fight to get a ham exemption into the law, and other federally licensed radi

    • Don't know how they would actually enforce such a law

      If you have a serious accident they check your cellphone records. If you just sent a text message before the accident you are totally screwed. Simple really.

    • I understand that driving is a privilege and therefore you give up certain rights when driving. In MA it's illegal to text and drive, don't know how they would actually enforce such a law. I cannot imagine a scenario where it would be illegal for a passenger in a vehicle to do anything with their phone they wanted to. It doesn't sound like this technology is going to differentiate between a driver and a passenger just if the vehicle is moving or not, sounds pretty lame to me!

      I don't think technology can fix this it will only frustrate consumers forcing them to go to extra measures to make their devices behave as they want (jailbreaking, etc).

      Did you even RTF. . . oh forget it. It's an app for your phone! If you passenger doesn't want it, he wouldn't install the app!

    • by Khashishi (775369)

      There are already passenger sensors in most new cars which trigger a check that the passenger seatbelt is connected. It should be simple to connect this decision to the function that prevents texting.

  • to enforce good behavior, we'd have more of what Rob Halford talks about in 'Blood Red Skies':

    Cybernetic heartbeat
    Digital precise
    Pneumatic fingers nearly had me in their vice


    Automatic sniper
    With computer sights
    Scans the bleak horizon for it's victim of the night
  • by D Ninja (825055) on Monday January 03, 2011 @04:49PM (#34747284)

    In one sense, I think the question "Have we entered an era in which electronics serve as mother, cop and coach because we can't manage our own desires?" is flamebait, but, on the other hand, it does pose an interesting question.

    First of all, using technology to help humanity - whether it is something major, like producing more/better food, or something minor like making sure we can wake up at the correct time in the morning - is what it is. It's the growth of technology. So, in that respect, nobody is doing anything different than any other person who has had technology...it's just different technology.

    However, I find it interesting that the summary posts a question about managing desires. While I know everybody likes to think they are more special than anybody else, and that THEY have no problem managing their desires and wants and needs, all you have to do is pick out any person out of a crowd and there were be SOMETHING that they struggle with. Eating too much. Spending too much. Pornography. Too much time in front of the TV. Overexercising (yes, I know someone who does that). Smoking. Drinking. Whatever. Everybody has something that brings them a great deal of pleasure - so much that they go overboard with it.

    So, the question is, is it a bad thing to use this technology that we have at our disposal to get in control of some of our foibles? I would say no. For example, I have a friend who looked at a great deal of pornography. While he enjoyed it, it was greatly affecting his marriage because his wife couldn't live up to the standards he was setting in his mind. In addition, he also neglected his marriage due to his addiction. So, my friend began to use an application on his computer which monitored his web browsing habits. It blocked him where it could, and would email out a weekly email to his wife, myself, and his mother (!!!) regarding websites he visited. When he would screw up, we would be able to call him out on it.

    Now, you could say, "Weakling. He should have managed his own impulses." And, I know he wanted to. He knew he was destroying his marriage and didn't want to do that, but, the ease of pornography access was too great for him to resist. He had to control it. Using that application helped a great deal and, after some counseling, he and his wife are happily married. (And, yes, I still receive weekly emails.)

    In any case, I think making a statement like, "Have we entered an era in which electronics serve as mother, cop and coach because we can't manage our own desires?" is not only flamebait, it's also seriously judgmental and unrealistic. I do think none of these things should be FORCED on anybody...but there is absolutely no shame in using technology to help control or manage a part of your life that you need help with.

    • Good points.

      Now, you could say, "Weakling. He should have managed his own impulses." And, I know he wanted to.

      But, of course, deciding to activate the "weekly emailer" program, and deciding to NOT deactivate it, are precisely aspects of managing his own impulses. Good for him.

      The point is that a person has multiple conflicting internal motivators. The balance of these motivators was tuned by evolution for a time period quite different from our current one (scarce resources, limited data, relatively short lifespan, etc.), which is why it produces perverse results in a modern world (e.g. over-eating).

  • new garmin nuvi. if you try to punch in directions for it to start navigating to, while the car's in motion, it won't let you. You have to go into the settings and disable the safety.

    "That's right officer, I was distracted trying to disable my GPS's nav safety feature when I ran into that tree." Wonder how that would turn out for Garmin?

    • in your hypothetical you're still the idiot who drove into a tree, right?

    • by Abstrackt (609015)

      "That's right officer, I was distracted trying to disable my GPS's nav safety feature when I ran into that tree." Wonder how that would turn out for Garmin?

      I bet you'd get laughed out of the courtroom, seeing as it's easier to disable the safety feature before you start driving.

  • how about an ap that delivers an electric shock whenever someone uses "like" or "you know" at random places in their speech.

    It's like, you know, really irritating when, like, you know, someone constantly stuffs them in, like, you know, multiple times in, like you know, every sentence.

    Should really come out as the more satisfying

    It's OUCH OUCH really irritating when OUCH OUCH someone constantly stuffs them in OUCH OUCH multiple times in OUCH OUCH every sentence.

    • by Abstrackt (609015)

      how about an ap that delivers an electric shock whenever someone uses "like" or "you know" at random places in their speech.

      You know, I really like your idea!

  • Is it bad because we can't do it or can we not do it because it's bad?

    When I started thinking about this I couldn't help but draw connections to the Star Trek episode Return of the Archons where a computerized facsimile of a philosopher (Landru) runs the whole planet, deciding what people should and shouldn't do, making them practically zombies, except for pre-programmed times where the restrictions are lifted (festivals). However, after generations of complete control rigidly enforced at all times by an
    • by neiras (723124)

      What prevents scope/mission creep from turning the whole race into behavior-on-rails zombies?

      Hello there, fellow former Ruby developer!

  • Once we get super intelligent AI minds all we'll need are slap drones and social norms enforced by convention in our post scarity, anarchic Culture.

  • Does ending a news post with a provocative yet insubstantial question guarantee its success? Do all recent Slashdot stories seem to end this way? Find out, right after the break.
  • Nannystate? (Score:2, Insightful)

    by kimvette (919543)

    such as a GPS-enabled app that locks down texting once a car gets rolling

    Thanks, but I would like to be able to text while riding as a passenger, and even if I am the driver I still want to see SMS traffic updates. I chose not to text of my own free will prior to the nannystate laws which solve nothing, and still won't text while driving. Go pull someone over for failure to yield, running a stop light, failure to come to a stop at a stop sign, or failure to maintain control of their vehicle and leave my pho

    • by gurps_npc (621217)
      I am sure that the credit card thin is something you sign up.

      But I don't want some MORON looking at SMS traffic updates on their iphone while I am driving next to them. Endangering your own credit rating is your own business. Endangering my life is another thing entirely.

      The fact that you personally may be smart enough not to text while I am next to you does not mean I have to sit back and let every teenage moron that has never had to slam on their brakes once in their entire life do the same.

      But fran

  • by erroneus (253617) on Monday January 03, 2011 @05:36PM (#34747796) Homepage

    I often bemoan the existence of the "snooze" button. An alarm clock is one thing -- a useful tool that nearly anyone who wants to keep their lives on schedule can make use of. And when it comes to not answering the phone or texting while driving? I have a personal policy against that... but have violated that policy once in a while.

    Self discipline is tough. It's worth developing though. I have an alarm on my phone for waking up and another for going to work. It's a system that works for me. I don't use the snooze button though. And if I had an app available to me to disable the phone while driving, I would use it.

    I had to learn the hard way... a few times... not to get into "bidding wars" on eBay. Now I just set my max bid and walk away. I do things to discipline myself frequently. I am a very successful dieter! But having reminders and other aids to keep you on track is a choice that can be made and helps those who are not naturally so organized. I am just not! I have forgotten my own birthday on occasions, so how can I be expected to remember anyone else's or to do anything else on time without reminders?

    I have tried to strengthen some skills in my life that I have finally given up on. Without tampering with my ability to concentrate and focus on problems, (which is something I don't want to compromise) I just find it impossible to have a "sense of time" at all. So you can appreciate just how much my first blackberry phone changed my life! Suddenly my phone was telling me about everything I needed to do.

    One might say "can't you just do it for yourself?" To them, I say "nope! I simply cannot." I have tried and whatever ability others may have, I simply do not possess. And the moment I accepted that fact, the less I hated myself.

    Okay, to be clear:

    I can diet successfully. I can develop and build all sorts of good habits and learn to resist desires. I can, on most occasions, resist driving while using the phone. But I can't be on time without devices reminding me to be. But because I understand that about myself, I can also see how others can have problems with diet, bad habits, addictions and using the phone while driving. We all have our weaknesses. And when there are devices and techniques to help people overcome these weaknesses, I expect people to want to use them. It is those people who know their weaknesses and choose to do nothing about them that really bother me.

    • by TheL0ser (1955440)

      I often bemoan the existence of the "snooze" button.

      My line of thinking on the snooze button is: If your alarm goes off, and you have time to hit the snooze button without it mattering, stop setting the alarm early. The fact it's an alarm means nothing if people can say "oh I can wait 10 more minutes".

      • If your alarm goes off, and you have time to hit the snooze button without it mattering, stop setting the alarm early. The fact it's an alarm means nothing if people can say "oh I can wait 10 more minutes".

        It's not that the 10 minutes doesn't matter. It's "I feel tired enough that I can justify getting in trouble for being 10 minutes late(r)". Possibly multiple times sequentially (much like *1* ice cream sandwich won't make you fat, saying that every time you want one *will* make you fat).

        so to answer yo

    • One might say "can't you just do it for yourself?" To them, I say "nope! I simply cannot." I have tried and whatever ability others may have, I simply do not possess. And the moment I accepted that fact, the less I hated myself.

      You probably can. I have controlled my wakeup time before, but I usually rely on an alarm clock... as poorly as you do. But it's not that you cannot, it's that there's a far better solution than expending the effort. Hell, if there was a pill that made people perfectly fit, I'd im

  • Software police? (Score:3, Insightful)

    by Shaiku (1045292) on Monday January 03, 2011 @07:05PM (#34748756)

    So far I haven't had any iPhone apps kick my door in at 4am, shoot my dog, drag me around the house half-naked while pointing guns in my face, make sexual remarks about my startled wife, stand on my chest so I can't breathe even though I'm not resisting, and then drop some coke when they fail to find anything and then admit to having entered the wrong house 10 years later after I'm financially ruined from lawsuits and losing my job.

    So no, we haven't entered a time when apps and gadgets are taking the place of cops.

  • by thesandtiger (819476) on Monday January 03, 2011 @07:28PM (#34748936)

    Ever since I've had a pda I've done things like this.

    Every evening 30, 15 and then 5 minutes before I usually leave the office, I get a meeting reminder: "Maybe you can walk home today instead of taking the bus?" Maybe half the time I say "Oh, yeah, good idea."

    I wrote a pretty simple application that will send me an email before I leave work; the email contains a suggestion for a meal based on recipes I've collected over the year with the ingredients broken out into a shopping list. A few times a week I'll detour to the market to make that meal rather than go home and do delivery.

    When I quit smoking some years back, I put my cash and credit cards into a ziplock baggie with "Remember: You quit smoking" on it because, after smoking for years, it was simply my habit to walk to the store and get a pack, and I'd find myself doing it by rote without thinking about it. The baggie and the note made me stop and say "Oh, yeah, duh, why am I here?" and break out of my routine.

    Little nudges can help loads. You might disregard them sometimes, or even most of the time, but they can help you start to do healthier things.

  • as a psychologist (Score:3, Interesting)

    by stupidsocialscientis (689586) on Monday January 03, 2011 @09:57PM (#34749972)
    I would like to point out that, by using these supports, you are becoming mindful of, and acquiring new behaviors. Given sufficient time, repetition, and success, they will become new, adaptive behaviors and eventually habits - assuming you are not prompting/reminding yourself to do maladaptive behaviors. This is not outsourcing self-control, but enhancing it to help with skill acquisition. During development we had external supports to learn many things such as tying shoes, learning trig, and so on, eventually we internalized these processes. This is simply an electronic means of doing so.

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