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Education The Almighty Buck Technology

Amar Bose To Donate Company To M.I.T. 275

Posted by timothy
from the holy-moley dept.
MBC1977 writes with this eyebrow-raising news from CNN: "'The Massachusetts Institute of Technology announced Friday that [Amar] Bose, the 81-year-old founder of the sound system company that bears his name, has donated the majority of Bose Corp.'s stock to the school.' Very cool indeed!"
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Amar Bose To Donate Company To M.I.T.

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  • Midrange (Score:5, Funny)

    by Wyatt Earp (1029) on Saturday April 30, 2011 @11:24PM (#35988280)

    Maybe they'll be able to get BOSE to make equipment that is testable for reviews and has some midrange.

    • Unlikely (Score:2, Informative)

      by Anonymous Coward

      These are non-voting, unsellable shares.
      MIT only gets the dividends.

      • by Yvanhoe (564877)
        Also, the number of parts were undisclosed so it may be just a very small part.
    • I genuinely hope that this is possible. It would be great to have a company like Bose, which has an Apple-like (albeit a bit worse) reputation in the consumer audio world, start producing decent systems - the current pricing structure could definitely support that.

      Just imagine - the tards buying BOSE because it says BOSE on it might actually get some decent sound for their money, and better sound makes the world a better place. Ever been to visit a friend for a few days and realized that you'd be without de

    • by gmhowell (26755)

      "No highs, no lows, it must be Bose!"

  • Misleading headline (Score:5, Informative)

    by Josh Triplett (874994) on Saturday April 30, 2011 @11:25PM (#35988286) Homepage

    The headline makes this story sound more sensational than the reality. MIT doesn't get any control over the company, just a pile of dividend-bearing stock.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    I also wish MIT could open-source the designs and IPs of Bose for
    the greater good of the audio world.

    • Good idea. It will tell everybody what not to do.

      No highs, no lows, Bose.

      • Among self-contained radios as small as a Wave music system [bose.com], can you recommend one with better lows?
        • by ColdWetDog (752185) on Sunday May 01, 2011 @12:40AM (#35988626) Homepage

          Among self-contained radios as small as a Wave music system [bose.com], can you recommend one with better lows?

          Just tune to pretty much any Country / Western channel. That'll bring you down.

        • I've only listened to one of those once or twice, and I thought it sounded ok. However, for $500, you could have an entry level component system (skimp on the receiver, not on the speakers). Heck, I bet you could rival the sound quality with a good pair of computer speakers (with sub) plugged into the headphone-out of a decent clock-radio-CD player. That should cost well under $500.

          Of course, aesthetics and size matter to some, and a Bose system certainly beats computer speakers. Of course, you can alway
          • by thegarbz (1787294)

            Of course, aesthetics and size matter to some,

            And that's the key bit right there. There's nothing good about Bose's sound. Their high end systems lack midrange and any form of soundstage instead option for a system that can be barely seen. Pretty much every other audio company can beat the quality of a Bose system, but you end up with some large boxes in the living room.

            Personally if the budget can stretch I'd much prefer a system from the likes of Bang and Olufsen who don't try to make the system disappear but rather make it a part of the design of th

            • While I agree that most B&O products are quite overpriced, I have yet to hear better speakers for the price of a set of BeoLab 5's.

              They're ridiculously expensive, yes, but they sound absolutely amazing.

              • The Beolab 5 like all omnidirectional speakers can generate a very pleasing sound effect. The Beolab 5 also uses some nice components. HOWEVER there are some fundamental flaws to the design that make it unsuitable for critical music reproduction. In particular this design is subject to what is known as the "flanging effect" that makes creation of a good stereo image impossible because of the upper and lower discs. It is an interference or comb-filter in the audio spectrum. These speakers also have a dip in

                • I worked at B&O a couple of years ago (that touchscreen remote? I worked on that) and during my stay there I listened to more music on more stereos that I would have imagined. B&W, obviously and Dynaudio was well-represented, being a Danish company and all that.

                  The BL5s consistently sounded the best to me when compared to similarly-priced speakers when playing music I'd listened to hundreds of times and knew extremely well. It was subjected to endless listening panels during development and various

            • At least B&O are open about the sound/picture quality of their products. They admit they do not sound/look the best for the money, but you pay for the nice design and extras like motorised TV stands and they self calibrate etc.

        • by thegarbz (1787294)

          Take a look at anything from Tivoli audio like the Model One. They have a downfiring port so placing them on a wooden table helps even more. But I was absolutely blown away by how much better they sound and look (retro) than the Bose crap.

  • by RockoTDF (1042780) on Saturday April 30, 2011 @11:37PM (#35988352) Homepage
    Something tells me that using Bose equipment is going to be taboo at caltech in the coming years.
  • And the link? (Score:5, Informative)

    by TubeSteak (669689) on Saturday April 30, 2011 @11:42PM (#35988370) Journal

    Is it just me, or did Timothy manage to strip out TFA between the firehose and the front page?

    http://money.cnn.com/2011/04/29/technology/bose_mit_donation/index.htm [cnn.com]

  • by dachshund (300733) on Saturday April 30, 2011 @11:46PM (#35988388)

    MIT has done wonderful things for the world. As have many academic institutions. But this is as good a time as any to note that making large donations to an elite academic institution is a pretty ineffective way to use your money.

    MIT is already well funded, and while this money may go to fund additional research, it may also just lead to a lot of pretty buildings going up. If you have the opportunity to donate, why not donate to a school that will use the money to dramatically increase the number of students it educates, or to a charity that sees the money directed into existing research initiatives that need it.

    I'm sure the new Bose facilities will be very nice and the Bose family will have no problem getting into MIT for the next few generations. Nonetheless, it seems like a bit of a waste.

    • Amar Bose [wikipedia.org][quote]Bose enrolled at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, graduating with a B.S. in Electrical Engineering in the early 1950s.[/quote]

    • Investing the money in a venture capital fund would be far better for people, including MIT students. Venture capital funds startup companies so those MIT grads and graduates of other Universities can actually get jobs using the knowledge they learned in school.

      Philanthropy is great, but it spends wealth rather than creating it. (Giving to MIT is more of a gray area in between though.) Venture investments can help the next Bose.

    • MIT is already well funded, and while this money may go to fund additional research, it may also just lead to a lot of pretty buildings going up.

      Note that he's donated it in such a way that they get dividends, but can't sell the stock. The dividends are unlikely to be large enough to fund pretty new buildings, but may be enough to fund a few scholarships.

      • by dachshund (300733)

        But do MIT students represent the best candidate for scholarships? My understanding is that the undergraduate population there is already pretty well taken care of in terms of need. By the time you have the credentials to get into MIT, you're either impressive enough to get a scholarship (from someone) or you're going to take loans --- knowing that in the final analysis, an engineering career driven by an MIT degree makes them a good risk.

        What worries me is all the talented kids who don't make it to such

    • by Alomex (148003)

      . If you have the opportunity to donate, why not donate to a school that will use the money to dramatically increase the number of students it educates, or to a charity that sees the money directed into existing research initiatives that need it.

      All schools get donations but MIT has done a lot better than the rest. This suggests that MIT is better at allocating money than other mediocre schools. So from a perfectly rational perspective giving money to the most effective organization makes a lot of sense.

  • Bose quality (Score:3, Interesting)

    by FTL (112112) <slashdot@nei[ ]raser.name ['l.f' in gap]> on Saturday April 30, 2011 @11:55PM (#35988420) Homepage

    True story: An elderly gentleman walked into an electronics store in Toronto looking to buy speakers. The salesman showed him a couple of different models. The customer pointed at another set on the shelves and asked about them. The salesman said "Oh, those are Bose, they're crap." The customer was Amar Bose.

    • I was in future shop and they did exactly that to me. I walked out.

      Everyone is bad mouthing Bose, but they have damn good sound at a mid range price. All my friends love my little Bose system in my kitchen.

      • Re:Bose quality (Score:4, Insightful)

        by Swarley (1795754) on Sunday May 01, 2011 @12:58AM (#35988684)

        While the bumper sticker Bose trashing you've been hearing here is pretty much accurate, if you read serious reviews you'll find that the universal gripe with Bose isn't really their sound but their value. They don't sound bad so much as they sound just as good as equipment costing a third as much money, and they sound considerably worse than almost anything else you could buy at the same inflated price. So you're suggestion that they sound damn good at a mid range price seems like you haven't done much comparison listening. You basically hit a bullseye on Bose greatest weakness as a product and called it a strength. Spend 5 minutes with Google "best speakers for $X" where X is what you spent on those over priced Bose speakers and you'll find a giant pile of simultaneously better and cheaper equipment. Take the $350 you spent on pretty much anything Bose and get some Audioengine A5's instead.

      • Re:Bose quality (Score:4, Interesting)

        by thegarbz (1787294) on Sunday May 01, 2011 @05:41AM (#35989532)

        Everyone is bad mouthing Bose, but they have damn good sound at a mid range price. All my friends love my little Bose system in my kitchen.

        May I suggest you actually go and do a bit of listening, not to opinions but actual system. The problem your statement is that they don't even remotely make damn good sound. Their high end system has no midrange, destroys soundstaging, and sounds like the retarded echo effects mimicking stadiums or cinemas that you can enable in Realtek Audio Manager on pretty much every computer.

        Bose is aesthetically pleasing, but way overpriced garbage in terms of any real sound quality. (not being able to make a duff duff sound from a small system does not a high quality system make), and I far prefer the look and sound of the Tivoli Model One in my dining room and have change left over :-)

        *** This post contains personal opinion.

      • Bose is way overpriced for what you get. They are a lifestyle product with a really huge marketing budget. There are many competitors who do a better job.

        BOSE = Buy Other Sound Equipment.

        If you want to hear good sound go to an audio dealer who carries Revel.

    • True story

      What's your source, may I ask?

  • Donations to MIT are so passé. Why not pick a random fast talking black kid from the Cambridge streets and give him that company CEO's job and house? Also, cancel all the previous CEO's credit cards and boot him out onto the street.

    I bet the outcome of this experiment would surprise us all!

    • by ThorGod (456163)

      I agree, it's very full of 'meh'.

      So a big name school with plenty of funding is going to get a bigger, more funded name.

      He would have been better off donating his company to a more needy university/college (or several).

    • Why not pick a random fast talking black kid from the Cambridge streets and give him that company CEO's job and house?

      The first week I lived in Cambridge my bicycle, locked to a rack at MIT, was stolen. In all likelihood a kid like the one you described committed that crime. Put him in the CEO position, and he'll be immensely corrupt and probably destroy the company. That's why not.

      • by mini me (132455)

        Put him in the CEO position, and he'll be immensely corrupt

        I fail to see the problem. Sounds like he is perfect for the job.

  • Can't RTFA (Score:3, Funny)

    by Paradise Pete (33184) on Sunday May 01, 2011 @01:33AM (#35988814) Journal
    I see that slashdot has added a new feature of simply omitting any link, presumably for the e-z convenience of not RTFA.
  • Having built my own speaker system, I came to realize that the problem with speaker design is to get good sound into a small and shippable product. If you can use your entire house, and many elements, it is trivial to get good sound. For example, many elements covering a wall, each with little effect, is a great subwoofer. After that measure current vs. voltage over the elements to determine element dynamics (Similar to algorithm that controls brushless motors), and feed that back as a correction to the amp

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