Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Earth Google Software The Almighty Buck United States News

Two More Google Software Dogs Go To Heaven 122

Posted by timothy
from the google-heaven-has-awesome-cafeteria dept.
theodp writes "Two more software products will be going to Google Software Heaven shortly. On Friday, Google issued a death certificate for Google Health (date of death = Jan. 1, 2012), and added that the lights will go out on Google PowerMeter on Sep. 16, 2011. 'We've observed that Google Health is not having the broad impact that we hoped it would,' said Google. 'There has been adoption among certain groups of users like tech-savvy patients and their caregivers, and more recently fitness and wellness enthusiasts. But we haven't found a way to translate that limited usage into widespread adoption in the daily health routines of millions of people.' Regarding PowerMeter, Google's 'Green Energy Czar' had this to say: 'We're pleased that PowerMeter has helped demonstrate the importance of this access and created something of a model. However, our efforts have not scaled as quickly as we would like, so we are retiring the service.' Google added that the White House will carry on the fight after being inspired by success stories like the Harker School (tuition: $36,435), which used grant money to acquire off-the-shelf sub-metering technology that revealed their energy bill could be reduced by not air conditioning the gym from 9pm-3am."
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

Two More Google Software Dogs Go To Heaven

Comments Filter:
  • by cgenman (325138) on Saturday June 25, 2011 @11:52AM (#36569322) Homepage

    Or maybe they walk into the gym, notice that the floors need cleaning up, send someone after one of the bleacher supports that has collapsed, and make a mental note to take down and dry clean the banners once the school year is over.

    When you're responsible for everything, sometimes it is helpful to have people who are only responsible for specific things. Otherwise they slip through the cracks.

  • Translation (Score:3, Interesting)

    by rampant mac (561036) on Saturday June 25, 2011 @12:27PM (#36569586)

    "But we haven't found a way to translate that limited usage into widespread adoption in the daily health routines of millions of people.

    We're not rolling around in money from all you fitness freaks while we quietly try to sell your soul to advertisers.

  • by hey! (33014) on Saturday June 25, 2011 @12:41PM (#36569686) Homepage Journal

    The fact that people need software to tell them this would save money is sad indeed.

    Not really, because I'd probably turn the AC back on at 5AM. I wouldn't necessarily know that the marginal savings of keeping it off between 3AM and 5AM are so small that I'd might as well make the gym comfortable for early morning users. Likewise, I might turn the gym AC off at 11PM, not realizing that the gym wouldn't warm up enough to affect the people working out after 10PM.

    So by turning the AC off between 9pm and 3am instead between 11pm and 5am, hypothetically I might be keeping the gym more comfortable for the users while using less energy, even though the AC runs the same number of hours.

  • google didn't help (Score:3, Interesting)

    by gargeug (1712454) on Saturday June 25, 2011 @12:49PM (#36569736)
    I was working on a metering device for residential solar arrays and attempted to contact google about the technical aspects to link our product easily with google's powermeter, as it was just getting going. They never got back to me or showed any interest in getting some products to adopt the technology. Seems to me they lost it on their own...
  • by AmigaHeretic (991368) on Saturday June 25, 2011 @01:09PM (#36569870) Journal
    I actually used Google health along with members of my family.

    Main use is each member has any list of medications and and importantly "Allergies".

    I used to have a piece of paper in my wallet with this information, this was much more convenient to access from anywhere I needed. It was good for an emergency, any when in a medical office visit where you have to fill out some form, and honestly I can't remember all this crap at this age anymore.

    It really is handy. More convient then scratching things off a piece of paper and updating it. Now I don't know how many people are in the medical industry, but there are lots of sites that are HIPAA Compliant that you can pay for, for this type of service, but Google was free and I could care less if the world knows about my Google logins allergies. The trade off was fine.

    This however is just another straw in the "Cloud" coffin.


    I think something like Opera Unite is much more interesting (The implementation is far from perfect), but an easy users side "Server" with plug-in blocks that can have 100s of mini servers serving anything--- WhiteBoard server, Web server, Music server, Video Server, Medical server, PostIt Note server, etc....

    No, Opera Unite, does not go through Opera.com. It can use a DynDns style url for easy access through opera.com, but you can access it directly through your IP and port #. Again, just the concept I think is more interesting anyway then the cloud. Any easy server, with "plug any anything" server modules.
  • by Chewbacon (797801) on Saturday June 25, 2011 @03:14PM (#36570718)
    I'm a registered nurse by day. I've seen my employer and other hospitals adopt electronic methods for charting, care planning, and most recently medication reconciliation. These are still new grounds that is littered with startups. Our new med rec system flaunts a feature allowing us to pull a patients current prescriptions and allergies from only a handful of major pharmacies. It's an absolute mess as the information providers often contradict each other. There is no common standard or sandbox and it has gotten so bad sadly even the almighty Google cannot survive it. I can see it as a good business venture, yet so many hands in the pot (many are companies with no healthcare experience) makes it a hazard to patients. Some of those hazards are prevented by people like myself. I am sad to see it go down hill for Google, I was hoping this was something they'd end up taking charge of and making consistent.

It was kinda like stuffing the wrong card in a computer, when you're stickin' those artificial stimulants in your arm. -- Dion, noted computer scientist

Working...