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Online Collaboration Helps Mumbai Attack Victims 46

Posted by Soulskill
from the pulling-together dept.
GillBates0 writes "CNN has a nice story about how online collaboration swiftly helped form a centrally organized online disaster effort during Wednesday's Mumbai attacks. India accounts for almost one-fifth of the world's cell phone subscribers. At a time when chaos reigned, and voice calls were jammed, a loose collaboration of techies, laymen, and good samaritans quickly collaborated online via social media, Wikipedia, Google docs and other online resources to coordinate blood donors, assistance, rides, and other services to help the victims of the attack."
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Online Collaboration Helps Mumbai Attack Victims

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  • by retroworks (652802) on Saturday July 16, 2011 @04:29PM (#36788768) Homepage Journal
    I work internationally with many repairers, refurbishers, and geeks of many tongues and languages. They are respected in their societies in a way that is more like we respect doctors.
  • by Doc Ruby (173196) on Saturday July 16, 2011 @04:35PM (#36788802) Homepage Journal

    The headline says "Online Collaboration Helps Mumbai Attack Victims". I initially read "attack" as a verb, not as an adjective. So it meant that the collaboration helps the city to attack victims. But in context it means that the collaboration helps the victims, who are victims of an attack.

    In English, those words are ambiguous, and mean quite opposite things. Does that happen in other languages, too? Would the translation of that sentence into Hindi also have that double meaning, depending on which word was stressed when reading it?

    • by angiasaa (758006)
      No, it does not. Translated to Hindi, the words get shuffled up. Roughly, it would turn into something more like "Mumbai's attacked victims online collaboration from helped". :-D It sounds kinda creepy in english, but the nuances of Hindi structure and phraseology would leave a reader/listener with absolutely no doubt as to the intended meaning. :) English is indeed a funny language, but I am pretty sure most languages share similar quirks. As indeed, does Hindi itself. This is just one example that c
      • by Doc Ruby (173196)

        Thanks, that's exactly what I was wondering.

        I wonder if the "semantically lucky sentence" is due to common Indo-European roots. Which would mean that there's a lot of semantically lucky sentences. Or maybe just lucky this infrequent time.

        • by angiasaa (758006)
          Hindi is an evolved form of Sanskritized Khari-boli. As a result, when spoken in its true form, it is very hard to cause misinterpretation of sentences. It evolved with the Indo-Aryan languages, or in come cases, Indic. However, there is a fairly good chance that transliteration of sentences from European and African tongues end up conveying a different meaning from what was intended. Translators generally require to be proficient in recognizing contextual nuances in European tongues to correctly transl
          • by Doc Ruby (173196)

            Thanks for your insights. How do you know so much about Hindi/English relationships?

            • by angiasaa (758006)
              Born and brought up in India.. I suppose with time, some interesting things rub off on you while you're growing up. :D Even though I'm Indian by birth, I am considered half-outcast here since I have trouble speaking most of the native tongues. I'm fairly good with Hindi, but that's the pure form of the language. I'm not very comfortable speaking the local dialects (which btw, are many!), enough to fit in.
  • (also see: eats, shoots and leaves)

  • way to go internet, helping a country attack some people

  • by parallel_prankster (1455313) on Saturday July 16, 2011 @04:37PM (#36788814)
    The government of India is pretty ill-prepared and inefficient for such events. The first instinct of most citizens is that they need to take things in their own hands. Within moments of the blasts, the people around the affected areas had immediately started getting help, getting cars to take victims to nearby hospitals, even managing traffic. The police and the ambulances arrived almost 30 mins later followed by a bunch of politicians who started the blame game. http://www.dnaindia.com/india/slideshow_mumbai-blasts-5-most-stupid-things-our-politicians-said_1565822-5#top [dnaindia.com]
    • Name one government who is really prepared for this. Everyone has written rules and procedures but when the first bomb explodes those rules and procedures tend to go flying out the window just as fast as the body parts.
      • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

        by Anonymous Coward

        Name one government who is really prepared for this.

        Israel

    • Even here in the US, you shouldn't count on the government to get there in the nick of time to save you. There are also times when it is too dangerous for first responders to do much, since it might place them in just as great danger. It pays to be cautious and well prepared for disasters and emergencies. How many of us have 72 hour kits available? How many of us have a one-year supply of food, or even a 2 week supply of food? What about firearms and ammo (no flamebait or trolling intended). How many people
      • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

        by causality (777677)

        It pays to be cautious and well prepared for disasters and emergencies. How many of us have 72 hour kits available? How many of us have a one-year supply of food, or even a 2 week supply of food? What about firearms and ammo (no flamebait or trolling intended). How many people know how to start a camp fire and cook all of your meals over it?

        Not many. For the rest, government tends to stand between them and natural selection. It's in government's interests to do that since they still pay taxes. The rest

    • by causality (777677)

      The government of India is pretty ill-prepared and inefficient for such events. The first instinct of most citizens is that they need to take things in their own hands.

      The USA used to be like that. Is there any way we can be like that again?

      A minority of us don't deserve the government our fellow countrymen are creating.

      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by kqs (1038910)

        Not so many years ago, in many parts of the southern USA, if a crime was committed and it was obvious that the government wasn't bringing anyone to justice fast enough, citizens would take things into their own hands. They'd lynch the person that everyone *knew* was guilty (who, for some reason, usually had dark skin), then pat themselves on the back for being such good citizens.

        It's common that during disasters, citizens take things into their own hands by looting anything that they may need or want, hoar

        • by causality (777677) on Saturday July 16, 2011 @05:52PM (#36789236)

          It's common that during disasters, citizens take things into their own hands by looting anything that they may need or want, hoarding it rather than sharing it with their neighbors in need.

          If you are actually prepared and have stored the essentials you need, you'll find yourself far less tempted to loot or steal anything from anyone. You may, in fact, have excess you are able to share with family, friends, and neighbors.

          That is what self-sufficiency means. It doesn't mean lynching black people or busting store windows and stealing TVs, stereos, jewelry, gold, guns, and food. How you conflate these things is hard for me to understand. It leads me to suppose you already made up your mind that there is something wrong with preparedness and self-sufficiency (the real kind) and are clutching at straws to portray it in a negative light.

          Especially the whole lynching deal... the founding fathers were clear about their belief that it is better for ten guilty men to go free than for one innocent man to be wrongly punished. That's why they set up a system in which police work is genuinely hard and those "pesky" civil rights make it hard. No matter what their citizenship or nationality I have a hard time considering someone a real American if they would reject this principle. They might technically be a citizen of the USA but they are devoid of any understanding of what this country is supposed to be about.

          • by causality (777677)
            Actually I have one thing to add to this, despite my reluctance to reply to my own post:

            It leads me to suppose you already made up your mind that there is something wrong with preparedness and self-sufficiency (the real kind) and are clutching at straws to portray it in a negative light.

            I think I know what you don't like about it. Both the situation and my personal general attitude reflect a belief that "if I did it, with modest means, then so can you; therefore, you have zero excuse for not doing the sa

  • Just goes to show what people can do with a network designed to deliver pictures of Ceiling Cat watching you masturbate. Such a clever hack!

  • Really, here is an example, when their phones broke down, they found other methods to accomplish the same thing ... interestingly enough, and entirely missed in the summary is the fact that most of the work arounds were traditional, not internet related methods.

  • why would anyone want to help mumbai attack the victims? if anything, they should be trying to stop mumbai from attacking!

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