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Internet Restored In Tripoli As Rebels Take Control 271

Posted by timothy
from the let's-see-where-things-stand-in-a-year-or-3 dept.
angry tapir writes "Internet connectivity was restored in Tripoli late Sunday local time, as rebel forces took control of many parts of the capital city of Libya. A new mobile network set up by the rebels in the east of Libya in April, called Libyana Al Hurra, and a similar network in Misrata, will soon also be linked to the Libyana Mobile Phone network in Tripoli, said Ousama Abushagur, a Libyan telecommunications engineer in the U.A.E, who led the team that set up Libyana Al Hurra."
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Internet Restored In Tripoli As Rebels Take Control

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  • by Dyinobal (1427207) on Monday August 22, 2011 @10:55PM (#37174594)
    I know I shouldn't be so cynical but I have to ask who is the new dictator? It seems like every time I read about some rebel group over throwing some government things really never get better. It's just a new dictator in place of the old. Maybe I'm wrong and Lybian's will get a government that is fair and some what workable but I'm not going to put money on it.
    • by taiwanjohn (103839) on Monday August 22, 2011 @11:40PM (#37174782)

      Bashar al Assad is thanking Allah that there's no oil under his country.

      • by Dahamma (304068)

        "Although Syria is not a major oil exporter by Middle Eastern standards, oil is a major pillar of the economy. According to the International Monetary Fund, oil sales for 2010 were projected to generate $3.2 billion for the Syrian government and account for 25.1% of the state's revenue. Syria is the only significant crude oil producing country in the Eastern Mediterranean region, which includes Jordan, Lebanon, Israel, the West Bank, and Gaza. According to the Oil and Gas Journal, Syria had 2.5 billion bar

    • by kbahey (102895) on Tuesday August 23, 2011 @12:54AM (#37175122) Homepage

      There is no guarantee.

      But there is hope for change to the better, where there has been none at all for 42 years.

      -- An Egyptian ...

    • by timeOday (582209) on Tuesday August 23, 2011 @12:54AM (#37175124)
      In the beginning, Khadafi himself was a well-meaning rebel with real credibility. Same old story. The US really owes a great debt to George Washington, rarely do you find a powerful man who doesn't think he'd make a fine benevolent dictator.
      • by antifoidulus (807088) on Tuesday August 23, 2011 @03:46AM (#37175782) Homepage Journal
        And ever since Washington rarely have you found a president who knows its best not to stick your nose where it doesnt belong. Washington basically warned us about the current situation in the US over 200 years ago when he gave his farewell address. In it he basically warned against the formation of political parties and against the US getting involved in foreign wars...... basically warning us to stay away from the two things that are biting us in the ass right now.
      • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

        by Anonymous Coward

        Also, it was more of an independence movement that a real revolution. Those tend to go a lot better. Getting rid of the British didn't destroy all pre-exisitng political structures and disenfranchise all existing elites. Also they didn't have the tension of fighting hordes of their own people. They weren't eaten away from the paranoia that stems from that. Contrast this with the French Revolution.

    • Granted that the rebels already have embassies in a quite a few countries, and have consistently stated they are interested in democracy, I think there might just be a chance we'll see that. But again they rebels aren't one homogeneous group, civil war is certainly still a possibility.
    • by McGiraf (196030)

      The new dictator will deal with American and friends oil companies, the old one was dealing with Chinese and Russian oil companies. So yes thing will now be much "better" than before.

    • by mapkinase (958129)

      I know I shouldn't be so cynical but I have to ask who is the new president? It seems like every time I read about some party outvoting some government things really never get better.

  • by wierd_w (1375923) on Monday August 22, 2011 @10:57PM (#37174602)

    Not about the retun of internet services, but about the entire affair of their dictator and the uprising against him.

    Up until now our reports are essentially the press releases of the rebel faction and quadaffi's, respectively.

    Unrestricted internet access would grant a wealth of on the street reports on civilian sentiment about these events.

    • by Sycraft-fu (314770) on Monday August 22, 2011 @11:56PM (#37174878)

      My guess would be they are glad to see Ghadaffi go, but nervous. The guy is an unmitigated asshole who has ruled with an iron fist and severely curtailed personal liberty, executed political dissidents, and taken most of the country's wealth for him and his family. You can bet he's not real popular, and I'm sure most people that aren't his cronies would love to see him gone.

      However I'm sure they are also worried. I mean who knows what kind of government the rebels bring? Maybe things become free and open, maybe they turn out to be even worse. Also war is always worrying because innocents get hurt, no way around it. You can mind your own business, strictly not take sides, and still get killed.

      • by X.25 (255792)

        My guess would be they are glad to see Ghadaffi go, but nervous. The guy is an unmitigated asshole who has ruled with an iron fist and severely curtailed personal liberty, executed political dissidents, and taken most of the country's wealth for him and his family. You can bet he's not real popular, and I'm sure most people that aren't his cronies would love to see him gone.

        Well, I guess 'consumers' in Libya will soon find out how it looks like when you have to start paying bills for everything, and when 'democratic' government is not giving out subsidies anymore (but money goes to themselves and their cronies).

        Mind you, I really don't like Ghadaffi, but Libya is now going to end up like Iraq.

        • by khallow (566160)

          but Libya is now going to end up like Iraq.

          Which would be terrible if Iraq were doing badly.

          • Which would be terrible if Iraq were doing badly.

            Yes, things are going very well. [nytimes.com]

            • by khallow (566160)
              So there was a day with an relatively large number of attacks. That's the point of making attacks like that, to get in the paper and provide a little propaganda to people who want to believe. I'm asking here for evidence that things aren't going well in Iraq. One day doesn't cut it.
        • by tqk (413719)

          Well, I guess 'consumers' in Libya will soon find out how it looks like when you have to start paying bills for everything, and when 'democratic' government is not giving out subsidies anymore (but money goes to themselves and their cronies).

          So, we can put you down as synic, yes?

          Damnit man, they're restarting their country with intentions toward freedom, and that's all you can come up with?!?

      • You can mind your own business, strictly not take sides, and still get killed.

        At the signing of a charter establishing the German Peace Corps in Bonn, West Germany on June 24 1963, John F Kennedy referenced Dante's Inferno when he remarked that, "The hottest places in hell are reserved for those who, in periods of moral crisis, maintained their neutrality." The people of Libya and especially the youth, who with neither training nor experience and at great personal risk, took up arms to liberate themselves from decades of brutal oppression deserve the highest praise for their actions.

        • The people of Libya and especially the youth, who with neither training nor experience and at great personal risk, took up arms to liberate themselves from decades of brutal oppression deserve the highest praise for their actions.

          Yeah, especially those valiant freedom fighters serving under this guy [telegraph.co.uk].

          • Revolutions are messy and bloody affairs and they sometimes make for strange bedfellows. In the case of Libya there wasn't any other viable option; four decades of Gaddafi proved that. Are some of these revolutionaries unsavory? Almost certainly, but that doesn't diminish their success. Libya is not the same as Iraq, the people in charge aren't about to hand the reigns of power to the Taliban-style Islamists; especially not after four decades of Gaddafi and his "Islamic Jamahiriya" nonsense.
            • Gaddafi's state, for all his Islamic rhetoric in the "Green Book" and elsewhere, was more secular than it was Islamic. Meanwhile, NATO is giving weapons to the very same people who have been fighting them a mere year ago in Afghanistan under the banner of religious fanaticism. And one simple rule of all revolutions is: whoever got the guns, is in charge. Would you bet on it that liberal opposition will end up with more guns than Islamists? and even if so, that they will be ready and willing to use them? Don

      • by Xest (935314)

        "and I'm sure most people that aren't his cronies would love to see him gone."

        What I found quite telling was to see the pro-Gaddaffi rallies, they weren't particularly numerous, and those that were there often seem to be very well dressed, with an impressive amount of expensive looking jewellery on.

        I have a feeling the only ones supporting Gaddaffi pretty much are the ones who, like him, are rich through exploiting the people and the country. Those who Gaddaffi has allowed to similarly exploit these resourc

    • by twocows (1216842)
      Really? Because I've been following the coverage on NPR, BBC, and Al Jazeera since about the time it started.

      The reactions are mixed, though it seems like there are a lot more people who disliked Quadaffi. Back before Triploi was taken, a reporter who snuck away from his chaperone managed to get an interview with someone who basically said "when the rebels come, they'll all have our support." And a lot of that happened. However, there were a few pockets of die-hard Quadaffi supporters who still resisted.
  • Missing the point (Score:3, Insightful)

    by wanzeo (1800058) on Monday August 22, 2011 @11:06PM (#37174634)

    I think rebel forces finally taking the capital qualifies as "...stuff that matters". Do we really need to search for a tech angle just to talk about it on Slashdot?

    As for the rebels, I have been impressed with how they have persisted despite awful organization and very weak help from the West. I am happy to see them finally prevail.

    • Do we really need to search for a tech angle just to talk about it on Slashdot?

      It's pretty common for Slashdot to highlight the tech angle of world stories, because they are interesting things that get lost in other reports. It gives us a chance to talk about Libya, and see a different side of the situation. Ousama Abushagur is now a hero, at least to fellow geeks.

      • by gman003 (1693318)

        Exactly. If we want some armchair general's view on the battle, or a politicians view, we check CNN or BBC or even Wikinews. If we want a comedian's view, we watch Colbert. If we want a moron's view, there's Fox. If we want the tech angle, we've got /. They all start from the same core story, but each specializes in a particular set of details.

    • by X.25 (255792)

      As for the rebels, I have been impressed with how they have persisted despite awful organization and very weak help from the West. I am happy to see them finally prevail.

      Ahahahahaha. Very "weak help from the west"?

      Holy crap, that universe of yours is amusing...

    • by tqk (413719)

      I think rebel forces finally taking the capital qualifies as "...stuff that matters". Do we really need to search for a tech angle just to talk about it on Slashdot?

      Yes. Libyan freedom is a good thing. /. is about tech. What's wrong with discussing the intersection of the two? If it's not relevant to both spheres, we waste others' time or abuse their patience.

      It's not like we're ignoring the "African Spring" by focussing on its tech. corollaries.

      Syria next! Woohoo! :-)

    • by mapkinase (958129)

      Do we really need to search for a tech angle just to talk about it on Slashdot

      Yes.

  • by Rakarra (112805) on Monday August 22, 2011 @11:13PM (#37174666)

    Achmed will be able to make his 7pm WoW raid on Ragnaros in the Firelands.

  • The dubious rebel claims have been inflated in the past, it's great they are controlling the infrastructure that exists but it could easily be fleeting. Gaddafi's son Khamis and a group of 10,000 well-trained troops happened to "just disappear" when the rebels got to Tripoli. I have a sneaking suspicion a terrible brand of urban warfare emerges before the internet is anywhere near reliable. Still, the article doesn't mention that the site for Libyan Telecom and Technology posted a congratulations message so
    • Gaddafi's son Khamis and a group of 10,000 well-trained troops happened to "just disappear" when the rebels got to Tripoli.

      They were mercenaries (or at least, that's the report, which is as reliable as anything out of Libya). They were there because Gaddafi paid them, not out of some misdirected belief in a God that will reward them for brutality, or out of a cause like freedom, or love and desire to protect their families.

      They are mercenaries. Money can buy a lot of things, but you will never find someone willing to sacrifice their life for a monetary reward. When things go really bad, the mercenaries leave.

    • by Xest (935314)

      "Gaddafi's son Khamis and a group of 10,000 well-trained troops happened to "just disappear" when the rebels got to Tripoli"

      That's because most of them were friends, and families of the general population in Tripoli and hence supported the rebel cause, and so when the rebels arrived, it became easy to defect without fear of being shot or having reprisals against their families.

      This isn't to say there aren't a lot of Gaddaffi troops left, there are, but they're mostly the handful of ultra-loyalists and merce

  • ...combined strength, we can end this destructive conflict and bring order to the galaxy.

  • At least now they can Facebook.
  • Oil revenue profits will be distributed equally to all citizens of Libya on a quarterly basis.

    You might want to mumble vaguely about presidential term limits, checks and balances, etc, depending on what you guys find valuable. Best of luck, hope you don't find yourself under a new brutal dictator next year.

    • by Dunbal (464142) *
      They had better hope it's gross profit, otherwise I suspect that the oil business will suddenly become highly unprofitable. Hollywood-style.
      • by delinear (991444)
        There are already accusations that energy companies are doing the same in the West [bbc.co.uk] already (massaging profits so customers don't balk when record profits are announced alongside record price rises).
    • Oil revenue profits will be distributed equally to all citizens of Libya on a quarterly basis.

      That's essentially what Gaddafi did (after pocketing a fair bit for himself... but still plenty to pass around). Somehow I think the new guys will not want to be seen as "commies".

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