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Microsoft Taking Apple's Walled Garden Approach For Metro Apps 389

Posted by Soulskill
from the leading-from-the-rear dept.
New submitter gauauu writes "Microsoft will be taking a walled-garden approach to Metro apps, only allowing enterprises and developers to side-load Metro apps in Windows 8, while everyone else will have to go through the Windows Store. Note that this only applies to Metro apps; the model for traditional desktop apps won't change."
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Microsoft Taking Apple's Walled Garden Approach For Metro Apps

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  • Let Microsoft HTMLv5 stay Microsoft HTMLv5. The same with Javascript.

    I don't want that crap anyway near anything else! Win-win situation.

    • by hairyfeet (841228)

      Oh don't worry Vincent, thanks to bonehead Ballmer's one two punch of putting Win 8 on ARM, thus confusing the fuck out of consumers and screwing retailers when folks take all these windows ARM devices home, find it doesn't run their software, and bringing them back in droves, and the stupid ass metro UI, I have a feeling you won't have to worry about it! Neither will anyone else for that matter as this is gonna be a Vista sized bomb!

      I have been showing the developer preview screencaps to customers and so f

  • And it begins... (Score:5, Insightful)

    by MagikSlinger (259969) on Monday September 19, 2011 @05:14PM (#37448830) Homepage Journal
    The end of computing freedom as we know it.
    • Re:And it begins... (Score:5, Interesting)

      by tverbeek (457094) on Monday September 19, 2011 @05:38PM (#37449212) Homepage

      Or the beginning. This will make it easier to illustrate to people the advantages of an open system such as Linux or BSD or Haiku...

    • What'd you guys expect when you went on a non-stop campaign to poo-poo Microsoft over every vulnerability? That they'd suddely Open Source all their products?

      • by Microlith (54737)

        Err, I expect Microsoft continue their antagonistic business practices that they've been engaging in for the last 20 years, including their unmitigated hostility to FOSS and user choice (that is, real choice and not "which Microsoft platform do you want to use?")

        • by Caerdwyn (829058)

          Microsoft can't pay their bills with "Free". Neither can you.

          Why SHOULD they promote non-Microsoft platforms?

  • Most companies would kill to get a 1/3 cut on every program sold.

    • Most companies would kill to get a 1/3 cut on every program sold.

      Brick and mortar stores already do. As does Steam, as well as many other online services.

      Thing is, most smaller developers would rather be coding than spending their lives dealing with processing/billing/installation/supply chain issues, so paying someone 30% off the top to handle all that is actually a good deal. Small developers selling cheap apps would probably lose most of that to credit card processing fees anyway. Big developers like Adobe and Autodesk do get a bit screwed, but I won't be losing an

      • Most companies would kill to get a 1/3 cut on every program sold.

        Brick and mortar stores already do.

        Not exactly. They get a cut only from what they sell, not from what competitors sell. I believe Nimey meant that by making themselves the sole source of Metro apps they are ensuring a cut from every program sold as competitors cannot exist.

  • Just the start (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Microlith (54737) on Monday September 19, 2011 @05:19PM (#37448916)

    The Metro interface (as well as the WinRT APIs) are covered by this policy going forward. So this means that ARM devices from MS will be locked down, as well as the Metro half of any desktop/x86 platform. Eventually they will deprecate the older APIs and you will only have the WinRT/Metro APIs.

    Microsoft is very much gunning to enforce a Walled Garden across all products that run their OS. I half expect them to make a hardwired TPM key a requirement for a Windows 8 (possibly later) logo, which they'll use against the user to keep them trapped in the Walled Garden. After that, it's just a matter of making it impossible to install other OSes (Motorola style) and they'll have the market domination and exclusion of FOSS they've always wanted.

    • And Linux starts to look that much better.
    • by h4rr4r (612664)

      Motorola failed at that, you know that right?
      Droid 2 and X are now supported by Cyanogenmod.

      They would also have to ban all emulators and VMs, like apple does on the iphone. I don't see that happening anytime soon.

      • by Microlith (54737)

        Droid 2 and X are now supported by Cyanogenmod.

        Really? They loaded a new kernel? How?

        Or are they using the same old kernel, with work around hacks?

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by Desler (1608317)

      Eventually they will deprecate he older APIs

      Bullshit. They aren't going to deprecate the apis that form the backbone of the millions of applications that keep people on windows. There is no way it'll happen.

      • by Microlith (54737)

        Sure they will. Oh sure, enterprise will be able to maintain older APIs. But they're solidly targeting the mass market consumer level stuff and leveraging their position to push developers to move to the new APIs. After all, if you want to be on Windows 8 ARM, you need to use the new APIs.

        They're just getting started. Don't proclaim their plans are impossible just as they're getting them off the ground.

    • by Geof (153857) on Monday September 19, 2011 @05:41PM (#37449272) Homepage

      To all who said about Apple's lock-down "but the iPhone is not a computer", this was always the end game. The argument was that the iPhone is not a computer (a general-purpose platform), therefore it's OK to restrict what users can do with it. (And besides, they said, we'll still have our PCs.) They confused cause and effect. The iPhone is not a computer because it is locked-down.

      With Apple making money hand over fist, it should be no surprise that Microsoft wants in. Will they succeed in their attempt at control? I don't know. But I'm certainly not going to make excuses for them.

      Don't give me the any flak about hating Apple. My desktop is a Mac. But my new laptop runs Linux.

    • by exomondo (1725132)

      The Metro interface (as well as the WinRT APIs) are covered by this policy going forward. So this means that ARM devices from MS will be locked down, as well as the Metro half of any desktop/x86 platform.

      No, that is not true, ARM will still have the Desktop application and will still be able to run desktop .Net applications, not just Metro ones.

  • Wait (Score:4, Insightful)

    by Dunbal (464142) * on Monday September 19, 2011 @05:20PM (#37448920)
    It's only a "walled garden" if you keep the undesirables out. With Microsoft's market share, everyone will be in the garden along with you. Wonderful, it's no longer a garden but more a federal prison. Welcome to the ocean of piss.
  • Stallman was right (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Monday September 19, 2011 @05:22PM (#37448968)

    Now, how crazy does he seem? He experienced the lock down that mainframes had and now we're experiencing the same things with smaller computers. Back then IBM (among others) also tracked your software and made sure things just ran.

    It'll be interesting to see how Windows Power Users deal with this. They'll have to look to IT to be set up as a user who can "side-load" an application. Like that will happen.

    • by RocketRabbit (830691) on Monday September 19, 2011 @05:25PM (#37449002)

      Windows Power User = knows how to change the default wallpaper, but can't code.

      • Re: (Score:2, Troll)

        by Dunbal (464142) *
        Apple Power User - oh wait... let me go ask the geniuses.
      • by westlake (615356)

        Windows Power User = knows how to change the default wallpaper, but can't code.

        The user is rarely a coder. That is never going to change.

        The operating systems that best serve the needs of users are the ones that see mass market adoption ----

        and keep armies of programmers gainfully employed.

    • by Dunbal (464142) *
      Except with mainframes the mainframe belonged to the corporation/university/government and the order to lock it down came from the people responsible for buying it and maintaining it. At best what you did was lease it by paying for CPU time. But no one is forcing you to bend over backwards and drop your trousers so that Ballmer can rape you with a chair. Microsoft has to make a fuck-ton of money in order to justify any project because they are so bloated. If they end up grabbing say 15% market share this pr
    • When I saw this article and the direction the computer industry is headed, I thought: "RMS must be spinning in his grave." (...And he's not even dead.)

      • by PCM2 (4486)

        I wouldn't be surprised if RMS has been making regular trips out to the family plot, just to get a head start. He's going to be doing a lot of grave-spinning one day (hopefully, in the far future).

    • by PCM2 (4486)

      It'll be interesting to see how Windows Power Users deal with this. They'll have to look to IT to be set up as a user who can "side-load" an application. Like that will happen.

      No. Microsoft is totally confusing everybody by referring to all software now as "apps." They talk about "Metro-style apps" and "desktop apps." Get that out of your head. Think of it as "Metro apps" and "desktop applications."

      Nothing is changing about any of your traditional Windows applications. Nothing. Microsoft is adding some new APIs and tweaking others, but it's up to you whether you want to use them or not. Office 2003 will still run on Windows 8. There is not going to be any Metro version of Photosh

    • by Mia'cova (691309)

      They'll probably just flip the bit to dev-unlock their machines.

  • Experiments (Score:4, Insightful)

    by should_be_linear (779431) on Monday September 19, 2011 @05:38PM (#37449218)
    With all sorts of strange experiments MS and Ubuntu are conducting on their user base, I wouldn't be surprised if we see Windows XP re-establishing itself as market share leader, using low-end hardware, ThePirateBay and developing world as its prime vehicles.
  • Microsoft just wants to get rid of that Borg-icon on slashdot. And out of desperation they're copying Apple because they have a much friendlier icon.

  • What's to stop everybody from registering as a developer so that they can sideload?
  • Boycott (Score:5, Insightful)

    by msobkow (48369) on Monday September 19, 2011 @05:48PM (#37449378) Homepage Journal

    So don't buy Windows 8. Stick with 7 or switch to Linux.

  • by Cutting_Crew (708624) on Monday September 19, 2011 @05:52PM (#37449440)
    "A primer for Windows developers on Microsoft’s website states that distribution of traditional desktop applications will proceed as usual. “Open distribution: retail stores, web, private networks, individual sharing, and so on” will be allowed".... This tidbit is NOT like how apple does things. The one thing i hate about Apples walled garden is that I have to pay $99 a year to test an app on an actual device that I OWN. I know Apple will say that they want their users to have a "good experience" or whatever but if i want to write an app that will heat up *my* phone so much that it makes the phone literally explode i should have every right to do so and if someone comes to me and wants to try an app that I wrote on his/her phone without getting a certificate key and wants to take the risk of his/her phone exploding in their hand then that is the risk that they should accept, understanding that kind of behavior isn't covered under his/her phones warranty.
    • by tgd (2822)

      "A primer for Windows developers on Microsoft’s website states that distribution of traditional desktop applications will proceed as usual. “Open distribution: retail stores, web, private networks, individual sharing, and so on” will be allowed"....

      This tidbit is NOT like how apple does things. The one thing i hate about Apples walled garden is that I have to pay $99 a year to test an app on an actual device that I OWN. I know Apple will say that they want their users to have a "good experience" or whatever but if i want to write an app that will heat up *my* phone so much that it makes the phone literally explode i should have every right to do so and if someone comes to me and wants to try an app that I wrote on his/her phone without getting a certificate key and wants to take the risk of his/her phone exploding in their hand then that is the risk that they should accept, understanding that kind of behavior isn't covered under his/her phones warranty.

      Shhhhh this is a Microsoft rant article. Reason is not welcome here.

    • On the Mac, Apple makes no such restrictions. The developer tools are free, and you can load any app you want on your machine. The $99 Mac membership is only for some special perks like having Apple engineers review your code, and WWDC session videos. This makes Windows 8 far more locked down than OS X.

      Windows Mobile 7, Metro on ARM, and iOS are even. They all require MS/Apple to sign off on the app.

  • by kirkb (158552) on Monday September 19, 2011 @06:42PM (#37450118) Homepage

    I got my first android phone a couple months ago. For my daughter. I wanted an app that automatically turns the ringer off during class, then back on afterwards. All automagic so she couldn't forget. I found at least 5-10 apps in the android marketplace that do this.

    App #1 installed with complaints. The first time the phone rang, the app crashed.
    App #2 installed okay, but wouldn't start automatically.
    App #3 acted like it worked. But you could still hear the phone ring even though the app claimed that it was silenced.
    App #4 almost works as advertised. It's supposed to "mute w/vibrate" but doesn't vibrate. Just mute. Good enough!

    It was a shitty, frustrating experience that made me appreciate what a "curated" app store offers. On the flipside, There's no app like this at all for iPhone or WP7. So maybe android's motto should be "we let you do more...badly" ;)

    • by jimicus (737525)

      Sounds about right. For someone who's been using a Mac for a couple of years, it's like going back in time to the bad old days of Windows '9x. The platform promises the world and it all looks very pretty but when it comes to actually doing something useful, you spend just as long messing around as you do doing anything useful.

      I bought an Android phone myself and it's the first phone I've ever seriously considered buying myself out of the contract of just to change it early. Partly my own fault for buying a

  • by cbope (130292) on Tuesday September 20, 2011 @06:30AM (#37454006)

    For f***'s sake people, please read TFA and understand before posting. They are talking about Metro apps only. Desktop apps are not locked down any more than in any previous Windows versions (or OS X or Linux). If you don't like it, don't use Metro. Use the standard Windows desktop.

    In a way, this sort of reminds me of the Ubuntu/Unity debate. Either you like Unity or you don't. I happen to be in the latter category, and I can choose not to use it. Just like Metro. I did not go into panic mode when Unity became the default, I simply learned how to select the standard desktop and went on with my life.

    I can understand the direction they are going with this, trying to compete with iDevices, and it doesn't bother me at all. Now, if they start to lock down the desktop itself, get out the pitchforks and torches or switch to something else. But please stop this over-reacting.

    By the way, I regularly use Windows, Linux and iOS devices and occasionally *BSD. I use the right tool for the job; there is no one-size-fits-all multi-tool, although Linux is the closest in this regard. All are useful for specific tasks.

  • by Tolkien (664315) on Tuesday September 20, 2011 @03:01PM (#37458988) Journal
    Wtf? Stop coming up with random names for pre-existing concepts. What the hell does side-loading even mean?

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