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Google Music Technology

Google Music Goes Live With Google+ Integration 240

Posted by samzenpus
from the let-the-music-war-begin dept.
angry tapir writes "Google Music, the company's cloud-based online music service, is now available to all users in the US and includes song and album sales, as well as an integration with the Google+ social networking site. Introduced in test form and by invitation only in May as a cloud-based song storage and playback service, Google Music will also let users buy albums and songs from all major music labels, except Warner."
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Google Music Goes Live With Google+ Integration

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  • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday November 16, 2011 @09:26PM (#38081324)

    The collection is impressive, as is the freedom (yes, it will also work with iOS devices), along with integration with Android.

    I have two sources for digital music - Amazon mp3 and now Google Music (not counting other channels). More choices, more competition.

    And good to see a better alternative to itunes (yuk!).

    (Now get on with your Google hate - that's the flavor of the month here on slashdot these days)

    • by CmdrPony (2505686) on Wednesday November 16, 2011 @09:28PM (#38081340)
      Why would I use this when I can use Spotify? For that matter, Google Music doesn't even work outside US, which is incredibly stupid as it is your own collection of music, not some streaming service.
      • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

        by Anonymous Coward

        Spotify doesnt have everything i have in my collection. Spotify also requires software be installed, gmusic is browser based which makes it more workplace friendly for me.

      • by agent_vee (1801664) on Wednesday November 16, 2011 @09:42PM (#38081454)
        Your entire collection of music available, browser based (no installation needed), no ads, unlimited streaming, mobile access on android and iphone with offline listening, and it's FREE!
        • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday November 16, 2011 @10:44PM (#38081856)

          Your entire collection of music available, browser based (no installation needed), no ads, unlimited streaming, mobile access on android and iphone with offline listening, and it's FREE!

          Umm, didn't you already have the ability to sync your music files to your phone? How many gigs of music do you really need to carry around? How much is just packrat/hoarding mentality? ("omg, what if I want to listen to my Englebert Humperdinck albums while taking a long walk alone on the beach, even though I live in Wyoming?") If you're a luddite and have an iPod instead of an Android phone, is there any benefit at all to letting Google scan your hard drive?

          Google Music requires me to install a program that scans my hard drive looking for music, and it seems to keep a list online somewhere of the music I have. Is this not asking for trouble? Is this not asking for abuse by the RIAA's goon squads? Is this not going to open the door at least to the possibility of a major abuse of privacy with legal and financial implications? "Don't be Evil" isn't reassuring enough for that kind of risk, especially when the only benefit from the risk is the convenience of sharing music with an Android phone (which I don't have).

          • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

            by oakgrove (845019)

            Umm, didn't you already have the ability to sync your music files to your phone? How many gigs of music do you really need to carry around? How much is just packrat/hoarding mentality?

            At any one time, I might only want a few songs from my collection. The thing is that list will change from day to day. Now with Google Music on my Xoom, my cellphone and my desktop, I don't have to worry about the hassle of "syncing" between them all. It just works.

            Google Music requires me to install a program that scans my hard drive looking for music, and it seems to keep a list online somewhere of the music I have. Is this not asking for trouble?

            Are you going for the Glenn Beck rhetorical question award? He probably has that patented you know. Good thing you logged in AC.

            the only benefit from the risk is the convenience of sharing music with an Android phone

            And your tablet, and your pc, and your tv if you have more than a cable box attached to it. It also syncs with a

            • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday November 16, 2011 @11:53PM (#38082228)

              Why are you so against this? It seems like the logical conclusion of my data being every I want it to be without me having to worry about it.

              Because:
              a) there's an army of barbarian lawyers at the gates screaming that it's not my data;
              b) the logical conclusion of my data being where I want it to be doesn't need to include Google or anyone else having a copy of my data: while that's a possible conclusion, it's not the only possible conclusion, but rather one that guarantees a loss of privacy;
              c) it's linked to all of Google's other information about me, and this is being compiled at a time when Google is expressly attempting to build identity verification into their services.

          • by bemymonkey (1244086) on Thursday November 17, 2011 @02:38AM (#38082846)

            I mostly have FLAC music, and transcoding every time I sync to my phone is a pain. Figuring 500MB per album, I can only fit so and so much on a 32GB memory card (about 16GB of which is filled with other junk anyway)... and then when the mood strikes, the album I'd like to listen to usually isn't on my SD card. Google Music or Subsonic are great for those situations...

            • yeah, very glad to see Google Music accept FLAC uploads.

              I have a non-smart phone where the contents of the memory card are accessible as a regular drive when connected to a PC. Easy to manage, yay.
              I only have to do FLAC-->MP3 when I'm putting something on there the first time.
              My phone doesn't read FLAC, wouldn't want to use it anyway due to space limitations (16 GB card, mostly music). even switched from 320 to 256 in order to save space.

              kept the FLAC versions on my PC hard drive, and play those when I'm

            • by xaxa (988988) on Thursday November 17, 2011 @07:11AM (#38083788)

              Assuming you have some space on your computer to store the transcoded files, I wrote a Makefile to transcode music to solve this. I can't access it right now, but I use a very similar Makefile for keeping all my photographs (at low resolution) on the phone, which is really useful for annoying people with holiday snapshots. I just changed it to work with music files.

              ~/.toPhone/Source/ (symlink to my photos)
              ~/.toPhone/Albums/ (this is rsynced to my phone with rsync for Android [android.com])
              ~/.toPhone/Makefile

              PHOTOS = $(shell find -L Source/ -type f -name '*.jpg')

              SHRUNK = $(patsubst Source/%.jpg, Albums/%.jpg, $(PHOTOS))

              PNGS = $(shell find -L Source/ -type f -name '*.png')
              SHRPNG = $(patsubst Source/%.png, Albums/%.jpeg, $(PNGS)) .PHONY: all
              all: $(SHRUNK) $(SHRPNG)

              Albums/%.jpg: Source/%.jpg
                              @mkdir -p "$(@D)"
                              convert "$<" -resize '800x800>' -quality 40 "$@"
                              @touch -r "$<" "$@"

              Albums/%.jpeg: Source/%.png
                              @mkdir -p "$(@D)"
                              convert "$<" -resize '800x800>' -quality 40 "$@"
                              @touch -r "$<" "$@"

              Then it's just:
              nice -n 20 make -j 4

              • Looks great!

                The issue isn't space on my machine for additional lossy versions, but rather a system for keeping it all organized :(

                Using Subsonic or Winamp to transcode on demand seems easier because that way I don't need any duplicates... and transcoding on the fly for streaming is even easier ;)

          • by Anonymous Coward on Thursday November 17, 2011 @11:09AM (#38085674)

            If you're a luddite and have an iPod instead of an Android phone

            ... that word. I do not think it means what you think it means.

      • by MikeyO (99577) on Wednesday November 16, 2011 @09:43PM (#38081468) Homepage

        Because spotify costs money (I either have to pay a monthly fee, or I have to buy a copy of windows or a mac or so). They say [spotify.com] this is because they haven't figured out how to display ads on linux yet. Oh and you can't store music locally on linux. This doesn't doesn't sound like the type of software I'm psyched to pay for. Oh even though I might be paying for a "premium" account. It would be unsupported...

        • by Anonymous Coward on Thursday November 17, 2011 @12:34AM (#38082420)

          You should register with the Pirate Bay. They offer free accounts, no bandwidth limit restrictions, no geolocation restrictions, they have a wide variety of musical genres and selections to choose from and you can even download music from Warner Brothers, no questions asked and no premium service fees required. And best of all, none of the multimillionaire executives of the RIAA are getting rich off of this service.

          Register today for the best Internet based music service in the industry:
          https://thepiratebay.org/register [thepiratebay.org]

      • by moronoxyd (1000371) on Thursday November 17, 2011 @04:01AM (#38083094)

        Google Music doesn't even work outside US, which is incredibly stupid as it is your own collection of music, not some streaming service.

        I'm German, living in Germany and guess what?
        I have Google Music on my Android phone... AND IT IS WORKING!!!
        The web interface too.

        Sure, I probably can not buy music via Google Music, but I don't need to. There are enough channels to get my music from.

        Oh, and Spotify isn't available everywhere as well. And you seem to need a Facebook account, which I don't have nor want.

      • "..doesn't even work outside US" for small values of doesn't work, i.e. Google says it doesn't, makes it non-obvious how to setup outside the US (i.e. you cannot download from the app-store) but it works just fine thank you ...

    • by sgt scrub (869860)

      Are you able to add your mp3's from Amazon and Google to your central storage machine and play them from any device at any time? I ask because if I can't add music to my streaming server I don't buy it.

      • by Tr3vin (1220548)
        Yes, you can download the MP3s from Google Music. Unfortunately, they limit you to two downloads for each song, but on the plus side they are 320kbps encodes. I think something similar is true for Amazon, but I have never used that service.
        • Amazon MP3 used to be a download-once deal, IIRC, but since they've launched their "Cloud Player" thingy, they seem to be having unlimited re-downloads.

    • by whisper_jeff (680366) on Thursday November 17, 2011 @01:07AM (#38082558)

      Now get on with your Google hate - that's the flavor of the month here on slashdot these days

      Wait. What?

      Seriously?

      What Slashdot are you reading?...

      • by dward90 (1813520)

        The one where online privacy and intellectual property rights are the most important issues.

    • Why do I need Google Music when Amazon works with every device, has no DRM and is accessible in other countries. Between that and Spotify (which also works on Android and iOS) I don't need to consider a service that may or may not disappear in a year or two.
  • US Only :-( (Score:5, Insightful)

    by SlightOverdose (689181) on Wednesday November 16, 2011 @09:28PM (#38081336)

    *Sigh*. Yet another fantastic music service not available in my country.

    • by Nerdfest (867930)
      Still no Google Voice here in Canada either.
    • Re:US Only :-( (Score:4, Insightful)

      by BatGnat (1568391) on Wednesday November 16, 2011 @09:36PM (#38081410)

      It's almost as if Google is a U.S. company or something.

      What about the rest of us?

      • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

        by Anonymous Coward

        bittorrent

      • Listening to Google Music on my UK Bought, UK registered, Android phone ... Not as US centric as Google want ... or maybe they don't care ...

    • Re:US Only :-( (Score:5, Insightful)

      by future assassin (639396) on Wednesday November 16, 2011 @10:28PM (#38081756) Homepage

      Don't feel so bad when it comes to Canada it'll be stalled by beurocracy and the telcos then they'll cry that its unfair to them since its a foreign company moving in. Then they'll just drop the data caps for intternet packages even lower.

    • Re:US Only :-( (Score:5, Interesting)

      by swordgeek (112599) on Wednesday November 16, 2011 @10:55PM (#38081916) Journal

      Let's be clear here. Google has introduced features higgledy-piggledy into Canada, and presumably the rest of the world. Can I hide search results in Canada? No. But I _do_ have to suffer through "auto-complete" and site preview on their search engine. Giving us half of the features is worse than none at all, because it makes things slower without making them better.

      But hey - Google doesn't give a shit, because they're working towards two goals: Market domination and stock price.

    • by loyukfai (837795)

      Yeah, but understandably, to fulfil the legal requirement of a country, in particular for music and video, is probably more complex than many of us think.

  • by Nursie (632944) on Wednesday November 16, 2011 @09:47PM (#38081494)

    That's why they finally rolled out + access to those of us that use Google Apps, they were about to launch a service requiring money!

  • Still US only (Score:2, Insightful)

    by wik33 (2505880)
    When Google will spread the service globally?
  • Gee, that's nice (Score:5, Interesting)

    by Fned (43219) on Wednesday November 16, 2011 @10:15PM (#38081692) Journal

    Google Music will also let users buy albums and songs from all major music labels, except Warner.

    Will they let users buy albums and songs from other Google+ users who record their own albums and songs?

  • Only in the U.S. (Score:5, Insightful)

    by echusarcana (832151) on Wednesday November 16, 2011 @10:21PM (#38081720)
    Only in the U.S.... so really, who cares?

    Last I checked, pirating music was way easier than buying it legitimately and no one cares which country you are in. Could the music industry, just perhaps, stop being a joke?

    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by Phurge (1112105)

      Last I checked, pirating music was way easier than buying it legitimately and no one cares which country you are in. Could the music industry, just perhaps, stop being a joke?

      Hear Hear. When will the music industry wake up?

      • by Mashiki (184564)

        Never? I'm sure the masses of kids these days have figured out the same thing. Pirating is easier than buying it, especially when it's free. Well there goes another generation.

    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by kiwimate (458274)

      Last I checked, pirating music was way easier than buying it legitimately and no one cares which country you are in. Could the music industry, just perhaps, stop being a joke?

      Don't worry, you're doing your level best to put them out of business. Hard to be a joke when you're out on the streets. FYI, the big bad old "music industry" is actually made up of a tiny handful of rich fatcats and an enormous number of passionate amateur musicians in their early 20s who wanted a job that got them closer to their passion in any way possible. Forget about the guys at the top...it's the hordes of young adults with stars in their eyes who suffer most from piracy.

      Of course, no-one on Slashdot

      • by Rennt (582550) on Thursday November 17, 2011 @02:54AM (#38082902)

        Forget about the guys at the top...it's the hordes of young adults with stars in their eyes who suffer most from piracy.

        That's like saying the people who suffer the most from abolishing sweatshops are the sweatshop workers. It's also a load of crap.

      • ...it's the hordes of young adults with stars in their eyes who suffer most from piracy.

        Actually, artists make almost all of their money on concerts and tangible non-musical items like t-shirts, because the music publishing industry takes such a large cut of each sale. Source: http://bit.ly/DigitalRoyalty [bit.ly] -- which doesn't mention that before they get any return on sales at all, artists have to sell enough to cover whatever advance they were given & costs they owe.

      • Tell those struggling amateur musicians that do not have a record deal, that "Shock horror" they don't need one .... ...Go get a PR company to promote your music on iTunes, and Amazon, and arrange and advertise concerts, and the record company can make those curious black and shiny wheel shaped things that no-one buys anymore

    • For the US people, however, buying music from Google Music and then streaming it is easier than downloading it somewhere else, uploading it to Google Music and then streaming it...

      Only applies if you want to use Google Music whether or not you buy the music there, of course, but there is a certain convenience factor that's undeniable.

  • Fucked again (Score:5, Interesting)

    by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday November 16, 2011 @10:22PM (#38081726)

    Spotify, Amazon mp3, Google music; all not available in Australia. iTunes charging so much that it's usually cheaper to buy the physical CD from America and have it shipped across the friggin' ocean. Well, at least there's Grooveshark ... until SOPA closes it down.

    • by Namarrgon (105036)
      It's OK, now we have Zune ;-)
  • by dingen (958134) on Wednesday November 16, 2011 @11:26PM (#38082068)
    I really don't get the enormous amount of new music services that have arrived the last few years. Doesn't everybody who cares about music have his favorite stuff on his computer & phone already? What's the use of yet another service that plays everything you already have on all of your devices already?
    • I really don't get the enormous amount of new music services that have arrived the last few years. Doesn't everybody who cares about music have his favorite stuff on his computer & phone already? What's the use of yet another service that plays everything you already have on all of your devices already?

      How about the fact that you don't anymore need to upload the music to all your devices, you can just stream them, meaning that you don't have to keep the collection up-to-date in more than one place and you're not wasting storage space? Or the fact that usually these services makes it easy to find more bands that you might like, basing the recommendations on what you've listened to before or what you have uploaded? Atleast I found literally dozens of new bands to listen to once I started using last.fm again

    • With iTMS, you can buy and then immediately download and listen to music on your iPhone / iPad. Google wants the same kind of thing for their Android, so that you don't have to manually sync files and playlists and whatnot.

  • Good grief (Score:5, Funny)

    by 93 Escort Wagon (326346) on Thursday November 17, 2011 @12:19AM (#38082340)

    This whole thread seems like "Super Smash Bros., Cloud Music Edition".

    Google Fanbois versus Apple Fanbois.... FIGHT!

  • by Anonymous Coward on Thursday November 17, 2011 @12:46AM (#38082470)

    A lot of people have missed one of the most important things about this announcement. Indie musicians, without a label, can sign up, sell their music, and keep 70% of the sales revenue.

    For years, we've bemoaned the RIAA and the giant labels for screwing artists out of their fair share. They're parasites controlling the distribution channels and deciding what pop-artist of the year they'll be pushing down our throats. Artists are lucky to get into the double digit percentage of sales revenue for their music, instead of pennies for a $20 disk.

    If a talented indie artist or band can put their music on Google Music and get comparable exposure to the artists pushed and promoted by the large labels, it will drastically change the dynamics of the artist/label relationship. Evaluation of music by merit instead of marketing might. There will be a viable way to make a living without signing over one's soul and rights to a label.

    This cuts out the traditional middle men in the music production process, and that's what terrifies the RIAA.

    Google has the money to buy out the major labels, but instead of doing that, they made a very shrewd strategic decision to instead use the advances in technology to democratize music distribution. That's big, and that shouldn't be underestimated.

    • by tooyoung (853621)
      Interesting. Google only takes 30%. What percentage does Apple take with iTunes?
  • by Undead Waffle (1447615) on Thursday November 17, 2011 @03:54AM (#38083074)
    I'm still resisting buying digital music until they start selling in a lossless format like flac. For some reason no major stores are willing to do this. I want my high quality archive copy damn it!
  • "well, sadly i'm currently 280 songs over the 20k limit for Google Music. i feel like i first did way back when i realized it wouldn't all fit on my 64GB iPod. something about the completionist/archivist in me just doesn't want to bother uploading anything if i can't have it all."

    This is a quote from a person who has his own successful band and who also designs and builds websites for bands more successful than his, using Drupal. Most of them are so done up you can't detect the Drupal in them. You've heard of the bands whose sites he does, but if I told you, that would be outing.

  • by Jawnn (445279) on Thursday November 17, 2011 @10:30AM (#38085216)
    ...if Facebook has shown us anything, it's that people love to "share", as in "inundate us incessantly with all the things they 'like'", be that snapshots, links, friends, etc. People also love to share their music. No, not as in file sharing, but rather as in "Dude, I love this song. Let me crank it up for you..." Couple those to phenomenon on one technology platform and see the wave that will finally sweep RIAA's vision of music distribution away for good.

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