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KDE GUI Software Upgrades Technology

KDE Releases Plasma Active Two 49

Posted by Unknown Lamer
from the that's-pretty-shiny dept.
jrepin writes with a snippet from the release announcement of Plasma Active Two: "Mobile devices that adapt to who you are, reflecting what you are doing when you are doing it. This concept is at the heart of the Plasma Active user experience. Plasma Active One was released in October 2011, providing early adopters the first opportunity to experience Activities on a tablet. Since then, the design and development team behind this open source touch interface has been hard at work on an update. ... information about real-world usage enabled the team to improve the end-user experience significantly over the past two months."
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KDE Releases Plasma Active Two

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  • Plasma Active First Post, ENGAGE!

    • Go go gadget Plasma Active First Post, ENGAGE!

      FTFY

  • Curious (Score:2, Interesting)

    by Anonymous Coward

    What tablets are people running this on? I'd like to try it out; I don't have a tablet right now though.

  • Clippy (Score:5, Funny)

    by tepples (727027) <{moc.liamg} {ta} {selppet}> on Wednesday December 14, 2011 @01:11PM (#38371658) Homepage Journal
    From the article:

    Plasma Active Two has one significant new feature Recommendations. Plasma Active is now able to learn as you use your device. It uses that information to make recommendations as to what content, web sites and applications are likely to be related to what you are doing right now. This technology uses the power of the "semantic desktop" efforts from KDE Nepomuk to make your device a more valuable adviser and helper. Future releases will build on predictive power as well as the breadth of recommendations. All of this happens right on your own device. Out of respect for your privacy, no data is sent through the network. And no active Internet connection is required for it to work. This brand new technology is not available on any other mobile device.

    So that's where Clippy went off to.

  • by undeadbill (2490070) on Wednesday December 14, 2011 @01:18PM (#38371788)

    The screenshots from the site are beautiful. I really like how they are *finally* taking focus on performance for lower end systems, and I hope it translates to better performance on lower end laptops as well.

    But I also wish they had taken this focus more than 5 years ago. It would have made a huge difference for me, and other people who have since migrated away from KDE because of performance issues.

    • by Anonymous Coward

      seriously? apart from 4.0 and 4.1 speed has REALLY been a non issue.
      i use (and only use ) 6 year old Dells, with integrated graphics and a 100MB net home folder. all graphics on. NOBODY has ever
      said it's slow.
      what do you find slow?

    • by AvitarX (172628)

      The work with the OpenGL when they started working towards a target of OpenGL-ES really made it great IMO.

      That was pre-work for the tabletty stuff.

    • KDE should have called 4.0 for 4.0 alpha, and focused all their energy on making it stable across platforms. The 3.5xx versions were power hungry, but innovated in so many other aspects.

      Their focus seems to be diffused. They spread themselves too thin even though the GNOME 3 issues people are having is the greatest opportunity they've had in years. Bad management I say, that's all.

      • by Grishnakh (216268)

        I'm just guessing here, but I'll bet that KDE has resource limitations that prevent them from getting things done faster; in short, they don't have enough active contributors. This is an open-source project, after all, but more than that, it's in competition with several other projects (Gnome, Unity, and several other DEs), so they only get a fraction of the total number of people willing to do open-source DE development. Worse than that, they haven't gotten the corporate support that Gnome has gotten, fo

        • I agree, I just have a different point of view, in that the 4.0 debacle could have been avoided by, well, not releasing it before it was ready. Early on in KDE, the focus was on features over documentation, stability, or speed. Well before 4.0, I had submitted bugs to kde devs, only to have them acrimoniously closed or denied, subsequently opened up again by others filing the same reports, watching those get closed, and then opened up again when a dev was forced to fix it because it finally stopped the sh

          • by Grishnakh (216268)

            I just have a different point of view, in that the 4.0 debacle could have been avoided by, well, not releasing it before it was ready.

            I don't disagree with that either, sorry if it seemed like I did. But even if they had made the same mistake of wanting to push 4.0 out early (as they probably only had limited testing from people using 3.95, as most people just don't want to bother testing out alpha-ware and would rather wait until it's ready for production use), if they had double the number of developers,

    • by devent (1627873)

      What are the "lower-end" systems you are talking about? Because KDE4 runs perfectly good on my "lower-end" systems, like my Atom netbook, my Atom desktop and my small laptop. In fact I don't see any difference between KDE4 and Xfce.

      Or you talking about old systems and not "lower-end" systems? If you are really talking about your old PIII that can't handle KDE4 any more, that's not a problem at all.

  • by thisnamestoolong (1584383) on Wednesday December 14, 2011 @01:37PM (#38372112)
    This is the right way to make a tablet UI; keep the desktop UI, and create an entirely new one for touch screens. The methods of input are so different that there is no silver bullet cure for unifying the two interfaces. The way users interact with and use such devices is fundamentally different, and the workflow for one is UNUSABLE on the other. Ever try using Windows 7 with a touchscreen? It's an absolute nightmare. Why would anyone think that it would work better in the other direction?
    • by unixisc (2429386)
      I fully agree! KDE left their desktop as is, and only applied their new design concepts to the tablet, where the pre-existing installed base was zero, and it made most sense. Looking @ it [kde.org], it looks like it could do a good job giving any challenger to Android or iOS a run for their money, should anyone want a tablet platform w/ a differentiating but competitive interface. There is no way I'd have used such an interface for my desktop, but I can certainly see myself using it on a tablet.

      Only suggestion
      • by rdnetto (955205)

        Agreed - this is one of the reasons I went to KDE after Ubuntu went to Unity. The other being that it is currently more customizable than Gnome 3 and Unity, while still having a fair bit of eye candy.

        Looking @ it it looks like it could do a good job giving any challenger to Android or iOS a run for their money, should anyone want a tablet platform w/ a differentiating but competitive interface. There is no way I'd have used such an interface for my desktop, but I can certainly see myself using it on a tablet.

        There's also a version of Kubuntu targeted at mobile devices (i.e. phones) in the works. I imagine that's one of the things prompting the work on Plasma Active.

      • by Carewolf (581105)

        Only suggestion to KDE - for a tablet interface, try giving those apps generic names like Music Player or OCR instead of Bangarang or Okular.

        Your suggestion is default, and like everything in KDE the name presented to the user is fully customizable, not just per application but desktop wide.

        Posted from: "Web Browser (Konqueror)"

    • by bmo (77928)

      Ever try using Windows 7 with a touchscreen? It's an absolute nightmare.

      Conversely, ever try Metro on a desktop with a mouse and keyboard? It is similarly a nightmare of unusability. Yet Microsoft seems to insist on their quest for the interface Holy Grail of one interface for everything. They will learn, eventually.

      BTW, I am betting that Metro will be the only interface available on consumer versions of Windows and if you want a traditional desktop, you're going to have to either shell out 400 bux for

  • I watched the video and noticed that there was no pinch to zoom. Anyone know if that is because of a patent issue, or because the software is feature incomplete?

    • Probably patents. A lot of companies are using screw-zoom to work around it. Thanks Apple! Nobody would have MINORITY REPORT thought of that if not for your brilliant innovation!

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by vizZzion (832507)
      In the MeeGo and Mer images, pinch-to-zoom works for the image viewer, the webbrowser, and other Plasma apps that implement this gesture. It's just not shown in the video.

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