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Censorship The Internet Firefox Mozilla Your Rights Online

Coders Develop Ways To Defeat SOPA Censorship 449

Posted by Soulskill
from the causing-the-law-to-break dept.
Hugh Pickens writes "The Atlantic reports that one developer who doesn't have much faith in Congress making the right decision on anti-piracy legislation has already built a workaround for the impending censorship measures being considered, and called it DeSOPA. Since SOPA would block specific domain names (e.g. www.thepiratebay.com) of allegedly infringing sites, T Rizk's Firefox add-on allows you to revert to the bare internet protocol (IP) address (e.g. 194.71.107.15) which takes you to the same place. 'It could be that a few members of Congress are just not tech savvy and don't understand that it is technically not going to work, at all,' says T Rizk. 'So here's some proof that I hope will help them err on the side of reason and vote SOPA down.' Another group called 'MAFIAAFire' decided to respond when Homeland Security's ICE unit started seizing domain names, by coding a browser add-on to redirect the affected websites to their new domains. More than 200,000 people have already installed the add-on. ICE wasn't happy, and asked Mozilla to pull the add-on from their site. Mozilla denied the request, arguing that this type of censorship may threaten the open Internet."
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Coders Develop Ways To Defeat SOPA Censorship

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  • Good move (Score:5, Insightful)

    by GameboyRMH (1153867) <gameboyrmh AT gmail DOT com> on Wednesday December 21, 2011 @08:17AM (#38447272) Journal

    So it's like MafiaaFire/FireIce for SOPA, just like a little custom HOSTS file in the form of a browser addon.

    Technically not brilliant but a good political move, to demonstrate the futility of this legislation.

    • by AikonMGB (1013995) on Wednesday December 21, 2011 @08:22AM (#38447322) Homepage

      We'll make our own Internet! With blackjack, and hookers!

      Aikon-

      • by Marc Madness (2205586) on Wednesday December 21, 2011 @08:29AM (#38447386)
        ... in fact, never mind the Internet and blackjack!
      • Re:Good move (Score:5, Interesting)

        by bluefoxlucid (723572) on Wednesday December 21, 2011 @10:23AM (#38448790) Journal

        Back in 2003 I started designing a Gnutella-like network aimed at being HTTP over P2P, effectively. Centralized server, CGI, distributed caching, end-to-end encryption, the works. It was based in domain resolution via named domain registries, with trust by digital signatures (PKI/PGP)--in other words, my idea of "DNS" was "I want the FOO DNS service and the BAR DNS service," and when I put in www.microsoft.com it would find records signed by FOO and BAR (no matter on who has it). These records may differ, so you would be able to use different "networks" (or really, name spaces). A DNS record would more be a digital ID than anything, too: microsoft.com carries with it a digital signature and certificate, and that is used to identify information from them on the network. It's possible to ask that a certain node verify time/datestamp and signature, so you could send out asking for a thing and have a copy coming down from a random node, which is also asking if it's up to date from the main server, as you ask as well--if not, the client drops that out-of-date page and grabs the new one directly, and the cached copy out on the network is dropped.

        Maybe it's time I stand up and lead...

    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by Anonymous Coward

      Do you realise what you've just done?

      Now, I don't know if people of other countries are aware, but there are some things you just don't do because of what you might summon [wikipedia.org]

      You realise that just simply mentioning the file in which hosts can be defined means you have probably cursed this thread with the summoning of APK, the hosts file troll?

      Cue a thread or two of people winding the poor dumb bastard up, as he continues to list his random achievements from 2002 whilst gloating about being a graduate from some

    • by elsurexiste (1758620) on Wednesday December 21, 2011 @08:33AM (#38447422) Journal

      It's not futile: it's Congress spurring innovation! Yeah, on workarounds for the law, but innovation nonetheless.

      • by snowgirl (978879)

        It's not futile: it's Congress spurring innovation! Yeah, on workarounds for the law, but innovation nonetheless.

        This seems analogous to the broken window fallacy in economics.

    • Re:Good move (Score:5, Insightful)

      by JosKarith (757063) on Wednesday December 21, 2011 @09:27AM (#38448012)
      So how long before these measures are deemed to be a "Copyright protection system" under the DMCA, rendering any attempt to circumvent them (even by typing in raw IP's) a crime?
    • Re:Good move (Score:5, Informative)

      by Blue Stone (582566) on Wednesday December 21, 2011 @10:13AM (#38448652) Homepage Journal

      A custom HOSTS file is all well and good, but doesn't take into account the type of censorship that's currently happening in the UK, with BT and SKY, with the Great British Firewall.

      Both ISPs have instituted a blockade on Newzbin using BT's Cleanfeed, which acts as a transparent proxy between the user and the server. Typing in the IP address results in a timeout. Using OnpenDNS or Google's DNS results in the same issue.

      If and when the US pro-censorship copyright cabals lobby for such a technological measure, a custom HOSTS file won't work.

      • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

        by Anonymous Coward

        the Great British Firewall.

        Wouldn't that be Hadrian's Firewall?

  • If SOPA passes, this might actually make me switch back to Firefox from Chrome. Of course, I'd have to download the plugin before it got stomped by a SOPA claim.
  • My sources tell me that evildoers possess advanced ICMP technology that would allow a pirate to verify whether or not a forbidden server is active, among other criminal surveillance, from anywhere in the Homeland!
    • I order you to delete this dangerous terrorist-aiding information from the Internets RIGHT NOW, citizen!

    • My sources tell me that the real evildoers are using the same ICMP technology server side or in transit to discover whom is actually attempting to visit said forbidden servers; This new technique is dubbed: Internet Control of Users Protocol (ICUP).

      The resistance is responding by creating a decentralized content store: HTTP over BitTorrent.
  • by Pichu0102 (916292) <pichu0102@gmail.com> on Wednesday December 21, 2011 @08:21AM (#38447302) Homepage Journal

    Honestly, there really is no way to stop people from getting around every roadblock you put down. Walls can only stretch so far. The only way to prevent them from doing what they want is to either destroy the internet or kill everyone in the country. The first could even be worked around with possibly WiFi meshes or usb drop locations.
    If the government decides to do the second, well, can't exactly get around that when you're dead.

    • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday December 21, 2011 @08:47AM (#38447536)

      Point is not to prevent every single person. Just enough of them to kill momentum.

      Point is to make it too bothersome for average person. Which this particular countermeasure is - it is hard enough explain how to torrents downloaded in ideal conditions.

      The fact is that it can very easily switch even geeks. I seriously do not want to waste time researching latest blocking techniques and some more time geting around them.

      If stuff behind lock was something i would not really want to spend money on, i do not bother getting it for "free" anymore anyway. If it is something that matters, actually buying it sounds much more economic.

      Also, it helps to realize that world does not owe you free shit.

      • Two Questions:
        0. Do you feel entitled to have free speech?
        1. How much did you pay slashdot to host this comment?

        Realize that you can have either free speech or censorship&copyright/patent laws, but not both...
        Also realize the best things in life are free; Ergo: The more things that are free the better life is.
      • by Yvan256 (722131) on Wednesday December 21, 2011 @09:32AM (#38448078) Homepage Journal

        that world does not owe you free shit

        That was the second goal of copyright when it was written. After a fixed period of time, art goes into the public domain.

      • Also, it helps to realize that world does not owe you free shit.

        I've seen few "pirates" that think that it does. But that's subjective, anyway.

        That said, what about sites that are perfectly legal being blocked?

    • by jovius (974690)

      If the government decides to do the second, well, can't exactly get around that when you're dead.

      True, but they won't do that because there wouldn't be any consumers left. The revenue sources need to be kept alive and in control.

  • IP-level blocks (Score:5, Interesting)

    by cpghost (719344) on Wednesday December 21, 2011 @08:21AM (#38447306) Homepage
    If meddling with DNS doesn't work, network operators will simply be forced to block at the IP level, e.g. by withdrawing the BGP routes to the censored sites. Good luck circumventing this kind of blocking (still possible with proxies, and maybe distributed anonymous p2p proxies, but a nuisance anyway).
    • Re:IP-level blocks (Score:5, Interesting)

      by GameboyRMH (1153867) <gameboyrmh AT gmail DOT com> on Wednesday December 21, 2011 @08:24AM (#38447334) Journal

      I don't know why sites threatened by this legislation don't already have a darknet presence, what are they waiting for? They should have .i2p and .onion sites online by now.

    • by JabberWokky (19442) <slashdot.com@timewarp.org> on Wednesday December 21, 2011 @08:44AM (#38447522) Homepage Journal

      If meddling with DNS doesn't work, network operators will simply be forced to block at the IP level, e.g. by withdrawing the BGP routes to the censored sites. Good luck circumventing this kind of blocking (still possible with proxies, and maybe distributed anonymous p2p proxies, but a nuisance anyway).

      Wait. Did you just state that there was a way to reliably block sites, sarcastically wish people luck, and then parenthetically note how to defeat your invented scenario?

      In that case: They could isolate all servers with blocks of hardened, compressed layers of dried pasta. Good luck circumventing this kind of blocking (still possible with trained mice who can pull ethernet cables through their tunnels, and maybe wifi on frequencies not blocked by pasta, but a nuisance anyway).

      Kind of fun. Now somebody else go!

      • Re:IP-level blocks (Score:5, Informative)

        by cpghost (719344) on Wednesday December 21, 2011 @08:54AM (#38447628) Homepage

        Wait. Did you just state that there was a way to reliably block sites, sarcastically wish people luck, and then parenthetically note how to defeat your invented scenario?

        It may look paradox, but that's exactly how it is because that's the way routing in IP backbones is working. Suppose e.g. that your provider is Level-3 based, and Level-3 withdraws the BGP route to TPB to comply with SOPA. However, TPB can also connect to another tier-1 backbone that doesn't filter out its routes. You, behind Level-3 won't be able to access TPB directly, but via proxies, you could exit Level-3 and reach that other backbone, hence reach TPB. Of course, that scenario is more something for techies as it requires constant updating of alternative routes, but the 99.99% of the masses won't be able to circumvent Level-3's IP-level block, and that's all the MAFIAA cares about.

    • Re:IP-level blocks (Score:5, Insightful)

      by cybergrue (696844) on Wednesday December 21, 2011 @08:58AM (#38447658)
      It has been said that the Internet routes around problems (censorship), however there are plenty of choke-points (transoceanic cables for example) where a reverse DNS look-up could be used to filter the IP addresses of the packets going through. And before you say encrypted VPN, the technology already exists and is being used to detect and block encrypted traffic (Pakistan and Turkey) on the network.

      Yes it is possible to get around these countermeasures, but it will not be easy and probably result in a significant decrease in transmission speeds (sending and receiving). And when these techniques become widely known, they will be blocked in turn.

      In short, this legislation will break the Internet. Laughing at the dumb politicians who don't understand technology is a dangerous thing to do because there are no simple workarounds that will keep the Internet working the way we know it if this passes.

    • by elrous0 (869638) *

      still possible with proxies

      I used to work at a place that had pretty draconian blocking policies. They used Websense [wikipedia.org] at full lockdown. Websense would not only block at the IP level, but it also actively blocked proxy sites and proxy lists too. And by "actively," I mean it updated every hour. It was VERY difficult to circumvent.

      The point is, if your ISP really wants to block you (and if the government threatens them with jail time if they don't), they can. Even if 1% are clever enough to stay a step ahead of them, 99% will be blocked.

      • I mean it updated every hour. It was VERY difficult to circumvent.

        And by "very difficult" you mean "trivial with some sacrifice of speed."

        My last night-shift job used Webnonsense. SSH Tunnel to Squid proxy. The low upload of my home DSL slowed things down a bit, but it was better than staring at the ceiling while hoping calls came in.

        • Tsk-tsk -- they allowed 22 out of their Internet firewall? Dangerous practice. Deep packet inspection also defeats the ssh-tunnel route.
  • Now the race begins (Score:4, Interesting)

    by timmy.cl (1102617) on Wednesday December 21, 2011 @08:23AM (#38447326)

    Or maybe now we'll see the race to buy "easy" IP addresses. "Visit us at 12.34.56.78".
    Now, thinking again, that could actually halt the long-awaited migration to IPv6. Who'd like to see an ad like "find our products at http://200147023aef0/ [200147023aef0]. Please remember the square brackets or you won't reach our website. And the double colon between 470 and 23. Unless you want to fill the omitted zeroes."

  • by gestalt_n_pepper (991155) on Wednesday December 21, 2011 @08:25AM (#38447346)

    Guess who will win?

    • by NeutronCowboy (896098) on Wednesday December 21, 2011 @08:37AM (#38447452)

      Congress. Because they have more resources and weapons at their disposal than all the geeks in the world combined.

      Here, let me give you another example. Do you know why the Berlin Wall fell? No, it wasn't because Reagan gave a speech at the Brandenburger Gate. Or because he managed to fool the USSR into bankrupting itself. It was because when push came to shove, Honecker and Krenz refused to shoot their own people on a scale similar to what China, North Korea or Syria did.

      Oppressive regimes only fall if they're forcibly removed from power, or if they decide that there's a threshold of violence they won't cross.

      • And what will Congress do about three hackers in Kazakhstan who decide to write something that gets around any restrictive laws and post the code to thousands of blogs, boards and so on? How much money canvthe USA expend on this? It's the equivalent of the Vietnam war in cyberspace, a guerrilla war where you *can't* win.

      • Or because he managed to fool the USSR into bankrupting itself.

        I prefer to call it a game of economic chicken. First one to brake or crash loses!

      • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday December 21, 2011 @08:50AM (#38447572)

        "Do you know why the Berlin Wall fell?"

        Lots of people pushing at it combined with the fact East German builders haven't got a damn clue about installing a foundation for free-standing structures? Close?

      • by cdrudge (68377) on Wednesday December 21, 2011 @08:53AM (#38447622) Homepage

        Congress. Because they have more resources and weapons at their disposal than all the geeks in the world combined.

        Congress has more resources, but when it comes down to it, who ends up doing all the technical work? The geeks.

        I hope it doesn't come down to it, but let the geeks implement exactly what the law requires/dictates. As the summary already indicates, the whole intent of the law has been circumvented with trivial workarounds. Pirates end up essentially unaffected and go on pirating, but the internet in general ends up dealing with the consequences when YouTube, Facebook, et al end up blocked/banned/hijacked.

      • by kikito (971480)

        "Congress. Because they have more resources and weapons at their disposal than all the geeks in the world combined."

        It's not only the raw number that matters - effectiveness is also very important. If you need hundreds of millions of dollars to get rid of hundreds of afghans ... and you want to get rid of 10 million people... that doesn't look very well).

        "Do you know why the Berlin Wall fell? No, it wasn't because Reagan gave a speech at the Brandenburger Gate. Or because he managed to fool the USSR into ba

      • by Yvanhoe (564877)

        Oppressive regimes only fall if they're forcibly removed from power, or if they decide that there's a threshold of violence they won't cross.

        And you really think that the US is willing to go to the amount of violence displayed in Syria ?

        Also it is interesting to note, seriously, not jokingly for once, that geeks do indeed form a community, a society. Not a secret society, but they are a group of people sharing coherent values that stems from their understanding of some technological details. It gives them power, and slowly they are becoming more prevalent in the decision structures. We are gaining effective power that does not translate to vi

      • asymmetrical warfare (Score:5, Informative)

        by Phoenix666 (184391) on Wednesday December 21, 2011 @09:35AM (#38448106)

        This is asymmetrical warfare in cyberspace, except all the resources of congress don't count for squat here. Even a small group of motivated and skilled hackers can defeat anything congress can throw at them because congress has no conception of how technology works. Even the contractors they hire are not skilled (ever see a government IT project?). FBI? Please, would a skilled programmer work on cool stuff in the free market for more than six figures or for $50K and more bureaucracy and drudgery than you can shake a stick at at the FBI? Let's stop propagating the "government is omnipotent" meme.

        Incidentally the Berlin Wall didn't fall for the reason you stated. I was there then. It fell because Hungary and Czechoslovakia stopped closing their borders to Austria and thousands of East Germans decided to "vacation" there. They crossed over, caught a bus north and hey presto were in the west. East Germany couldn't stop them because of warsaw pact treaties and because russia under gorbachev wouldn't change them. So the government of erich honneker destabilized, was replaced with egon krenz, who in a bid to stop the whole country emptying out opened the wall so easterners could visit and come back. That is why it fell.

    • by Scr4tchFury (1211936) on Wednesday December 21, 2011 @08:44AM (#38447518)
      The lawyers.
    • by elrous0 (869638) *

      Guess who will win?

      The first government leader crazy enough to declare martial law and deploy the military, I imagine.

  • Touchingly naive (Score:5, Insightful)

    by GauteL (29207) on Wednesday December 21, 2011 @08:35AM (#38447434)

    "So here's some proof that I hope will help them err on the side of reason and vote SOPA down"

    Eh... no. If the war against drugs/piracy/terrorism has taught us anything, it is that if the law makers were made to understand that it won't work, they would just try more draconian measures.

    By all means, petition them in terms of freedom of speech, cost or restricting innovation, arguing that "The more you tighten your grip, the more star systems will slip through" will simply make them tighten their grip further.

    • by mapkinase (958129)

      No, it is exactly the opposite: you are naive and your 3 mods. Technology is on our side, we are savvier zillion times than the congress idiots.

      The whole point of argument is that they cannot achieve their goals without harming innocent bystenanders.

      In this war we are not moving from cluster bombs towards drones, we are moving from drones to cluster bombs. And the more casulaties the larger is backlash from bystanders - companies that are hurt because of the new law.

    • by Fubari (196373)
      Yeah, I thought of this http://xkcd.com/651/ ("But if you're worried about bombs, why are you letting me keep my laptop batteries?") [xkcd.com] when reading the fine article [torrentfreak.com]:

      “It could be that a few members of congress are just not tech savvy and don’t understand that it is technically not going to work, at all. So here’s some proof that I hope will help them err on the side of reason and vote SOPA down,” he adds.

      *sigh*
      T Rizk: "Excuse me, Congress? SOPA is ineffective because it has a gaping hole so just forget SOPA, ok?"
      Congress: "Oh T Riz! Bless you you for enlightening us! Uh, we won't prosecute you for hacking. Really."

  • by Lumpy (12016)

    "'It could be that a few members of Congress are just not tech savvy and don't understand that it is technically not going to work, at all"

    Most congress critters don't have even a clue as to how the internet in general works. Honestly the lack of education with these idiots is staggering.

    Congress today is a large group of poorly educated, self serving, sociopath children.

    • by CastrTroy (595695)
      Most PEOPLE don't have even a clue as to how the internet in general works. Honestly the lack of education with these idiots is staggering.

      FTFY. Ok, but not everybody gets to decide on internet encumbering laws either, but this is the same kind of thing that happens all over the place. Crazy policies made up by pointy haired bosses that network admins need to implement, even though they don't accomplish much to anybody remotely educated in how these things work. But it stops most people . I have a ne
      • by CastrTroy (595695)
        Sorry, forgot to close my bold tag, slashdot really should warn you about that.
        • by tqk (413719)

          Sorry, forgot to close my bold tag, slashdot really should warn you about that.

          It does. It's called the Preview button. Why the !@#$ proofreading went out of style, I don't know, but no-one's being forced to be stupid. It's a lifestyle choice.

    • by RogerWilco (99615)

      As I understand, a large part of current US Senators and Representatives pride themselves on never having used the internet.

      At all.

      http://motherboard.vice.com/2011/12/16/dear-congress-it-s-no-longer-ok-to-not-know-how-the-internet-works [vice.com]

    • by 0123456 (636235)

      Congress today is a large group of poorly educated, self serving, sociopath children.

      You say that as though you think it ever wasn't a group of poorly-educated, self-serving, sociopathic children.

    • by Dhalka226 (559740)

      You're not wrong, but this guy also seems to think better of his addon than he really should.

      His little addon works, at least somewhat, for those sites with a single static IP. It fails at doing anything about the millions and millions of websites, and probably the majority of sites that a bill like SOPA would seek to eliminate, that run on vhosts behind a single IP. Going to the IP of the domain I use for email and as a homepage gets me a wonderful Apache error message; with other hosts, it likely gets

    • by Inda (580031)
      I explained the DNS to my aging father in a matter of minutes. It's not hard to understand the basics.

      How can our lords and masters not understand the basics?

      "Dad, it's like the phone book. You look up the name of the person/website, and to the right it displays the phone number/IP number. IP numbers are just like phone numbers; every computer on the internet has one"

      So that took all of 10 seconds, not the minutes I first said.

      How can our lords and masters not understand the basics?
  • Just point your DNS to 8.8.8.8

    • by Carewolf (581105)

      I assume 8.8.8.8 is hosted in the US which would break it once SOPA is made into law.

  • Shattered Net (Score:5, Interesting)

    by SpinningCone (1278698) on Wednesday December 21, 2011 @08:53AM (#38447608)

    I suspected someone would do this since they were basing blocking on domain. essentially SOPA will kill DNS.

    people will begin passing raw addresses/ports to each other and you will end up with another dark-net, one where there are no domain names or to access it you have to get a hold of a domain file for a plug in.

    soon there will be sites dedicated to the pirate DNS then there will be assholes who distribute bad DNS files leading to pages with drive by attacks. peges will be fighting over their old domain names since there will be no registrar for this dark net.

    this security issue will likely push the P2P DNS efforts already in place.

  • by fredan (54788)

    we in the rest of the world could stop using american resources on the internet.

    and yes, that includes me no to visit slashdot.org anymore.

    • by cpghost (719344)

      we in the rest of the world could stop using american resources on the internet.

      So American websites will start moving abroad. And frankly, why not, if the environment there is becoming so hostile? They already outsourced industrial production, why wouldn't they outsource websites? En masse? To protest SOPA et al? The day we hear that Google Inc. moved all its technical infrastructure to Iceland (or some other internet-friendly place), it would be a giant leap for freedom on the Internet. That's kind of s

      • by fredan (54788)

        So American websites will start moving abroad.

        and the best part of that is that USA is not gonna get any new money into the country. it's a win-win!

  • Back to the good old hosts file.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hosts_(file) [wikipedia.org]
    Maybe we will create cron-jobs again to download the newest hosts file from some trusted source.

  • by JDG1980 (2438906) on Wednesday December 21, 2011 @09:02AM (#38447694)
    This legislation, combined with the recent domain seizures by ICS, highlights a weakness in the current DNS system: it's far too centralized and way too subject to censorship by governments. Rather than individual, browser-based workarounds, we need a completely new DNS system that is based on some form of distributed computing and lacks a central point of failure. Given the presence of existing protocols like BitTorrent, Tor, and Bitcoin, this should be possible to do.
  • Wouldn't this break sites hosted on a shared IP address with multiple domain names?
  • Speaking about DNS blocking and DNS names. How large would a full dump of the whole DNS system actually be? From the numbers I could gather it be in the low GB range for all the top level domains and easily fit on a DVD, i.e. a rather trivial size in the days of movie streaming. How much bigger would it get by including all the subdomains (I assume you'd need a spider to actually gather those)? How big would daily updates be? In essence would it be possible to just completely bypass the classic DNS and move

  • These cowboys better be careful when messing with ICE, it could be black.

  • Mozilla denied the request, arguing that this type of censorship may threaten the open Internet.

    With all the BS that's coming out of Mozilla these days, glad to see they still can do some things right.

  • by Pawnn (1708484) on Wednesday December 21, 2011 @10:36AM (#38449002)
    The other day I decided to send a note to my senator urging him not to pass SOPA.

    Here's the response I got. It made me sad.
    Dear Joshua,

    Thank you for contacting me regarding S. 968, the Protect IP Act.

    Intellectual property industries employ more than 19 million people, making it an integral part of our economy. Rogue websites dedicated to the sale and distribution of counterfeit goods and pirated content are a direct threat to these jobs and to entrepreneurs growing and building legitimate businesses online.

    Businesses have lost $135 billion in revenue annually as a result of these rogue sites. Customers have also been harmed by these sites; for example, online pharmacies that don't adhere to U.S. regulations have been reported to cause a rapid increase in prescription drug abuse.

    I am a cosponsor of the Protect IP Act which would cut off foreign websites dedicated to counterfeiting and piracy that steal American jobs, hurt the economy, and harm customers. It would allow the Justice Department to file a civil action against those who have registered or own a domain name linked to an infringing website. The bill does not allow the Justice Department to target domain names registered by a U.S. entity.

    Innovation is a cornerstone of our nation's economic growth. Proper intellectual property protections and incentives ensure that inventors develop products that benefit consumers. Without such incentives for innovators, we risk falling behind places like China and India.

    Again, thank you for contacting me. I look forward to continuing our conversation on Facebook (www.facebook.com/SenatorBlunt) and Twitter (www.twitter.com/RoyBlunt) about the important issues facing Missouri and the country. I also encourage you to visit my website (blunt.senate.gov) to learn more about where I stand on the issues and sign-up for my e-newsletter.

    Sincere regards,
    Roy Blunt United States Senator
    • by drb226 (1938360)

      which would cut off foreign websites dedicated to counterfeiting and piracy that steal American jobs, hurt the economy, and harm customers. It would allow the Justice Department to file a civil action against those who have registered or own a domain name linked to an infringing website.

      So...our plan is to cut America off from those nasty pirates, so that good ol' Americans will be forced to pay full price for content they might otherwise pirate? Does this supposed $135 billion lost annual revenue come entirely from the US? There are so many things wrong with this guy's logic...

  • by SD-Arcadia (1146999) on Wednesday December 21, 2011 @10:44AM (#38449116) Homepage
    Govts are restricting the internet with salami tactics. In Turkey you can find several levels of censhorship. Some you can circumvent with OpenDNS, others you need proxies/vpn. Then there is the opt-in censhorship of "internet profiles" such as "family internet" or "children's internet".
    Every time they up the ante techies realized they could circumvent the effects rather easily, but many many more do not have the know-how.
    So the most active knowledgeable users like us develop apathy because we are not really affected, therefore we stay passive, while for the vast majority of users the internet gets more and more restricted. Let's not fall for this complicity strategy.

I have yet to see any problem, however complicated, which, when you looked at it in the right way, did not become still more complicated. -- Poul Anderson

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