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The Internet Technology

Go Daddy Loses Over 21,000 Domains In One Day 356

Posted by samzenpus
from the reaping-what-you-sow dept.
First time accepted submitter expo53d writes "CNET reports that yesterday 21,054 domains were pulled off Domaincontrol.com, a subsidiary of GoDaddy. While this maybe a coincidence, it is likely to be caused by GoDaddy's controversial support for SOPA. It seems that GoDaddy's attempts at remedying the problem were of no use."
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Go Daddy Loses Over 21,000 Domains In One Day

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  • by gl4ss (559668) on Sunday December 25, 2011 @02:10PM (#38489250) Homepage Journal

    a banned domain = customer has to buy another?

    • by Stradenko (160417) on Sunday December 25, 2011 @02:13PM (#38489272) Homepage

      Government regulation of an industry increases the cost of entry for new competition. Established business will support something that gives them that kind of edge.

      • by Burz (138833) on Sunday December 25, 2011 @07:16PM (#38490746) Journal

        Government regulation of an industry increases the cost of entry for new competition.

        Except when the cost of entry goes down to zero because no one dares to compete with UNregulated monopolies and cartels.

        BTW, if you have a recipe for getting corporate influence out of government without regulation (in a sense restricting the corporations' FREEEEEDOM), please do the world a favor and let us know. Otherwise, most of us are beyond tired of hearing simplistic aphorisms from the planet Rand.

        • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

          by Stradenko (160417)

          The recipe for getting corporate influence out of government is to reduce governmental power in corporate behavior. I'm sorry you hate Rand, but that's the gist of it. If the business isn't controlled by government, then business has no interest in government and we can all go about our lives. If you don't like what company does, please found company and change the industry, or at least your small part of it. The problem with regulation and subsidy is that it obfuscates the costs of delivery, so nobody

        • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

          by bill_mcgonigle (4333) *

          BTW, if you have a recipe for getting corporate influence out of government without regulation (in a sense restricting the corporations' FREEEEEDOM), please do the world a favor and let us know.

          When there is nothing for influence peddlers to sell, there will be no influence sold.

          More simply: take the power away from government and people won't go looking for government to do things for them.

          Ironically, TFA is about the market regulating bad actors, exactly what big-government supporters say the market can'

      • by cavebison (1107959) on Monday December 26, 2011 @12:02AM (#38491970)

        Established business will support something that gives them that kind of edge.

        Good point. And because the law says shareholders come first, they would practically be required to support it (the same way you're forced to defend patents or lose them), even if the CEO didn't like it.

        Try convincing shareholders that you don't want to do something which protects their investment merely because it's unethical. Your choice is do it, or lose the confidence of the board and possibly lose your company.

        This is the root problem with *everything*, and I mean everything, that goes wrong in business - from pollution to safety to employment - it affects every part of our lives. The law which says shareholders come first.

        Nothing will change if that law isn't changed. I feel this is what the Occupy movement should have concentrated on. You can't ask corporations to "play fair" when the law itself says otherwise.

    • by Baloroth (2370816) on Sunday December 25, 2011 @02:24PM (#38489354)
      GoDaddy got the seized domains from the last round of ICE seizures. I'll let you connect the dots.
      • Very good point! (Score:5, Informative)

        by Weezul (52464) on Sunday December 25, 2011 @02:28PM (#38489384)

        Also, GoDaddy has NOT withdrawn its official congressional support for SOPA [reddit.com], but they pretend they did when talking to the press.

        • by rgbrenner (317308) on Sunday December 25, 2011 @02:57PM (#38489570)

          GoDaddy has NOT withdrawn its official congressional support for SOPA

          That's great... Yesterday, I figured I'll just leave my 15 domains there since they backed off their support.. but apparently only in words.

          The way I see it, GoDaddy should be happy people are leaving.. if you run a site that has any user content, SOPA will mean you'll have to shut it down anyway.

          godaddy + sopa support = one less godaddy domain
          sopa passes = one less godaddy domain

          So they're getting what they want either way. They should be happy.

          • by RMingin (985478) on Sunday December 25, 2011 @03:02PM (#38489596) Homepage

            I'm working on transferring my domain off of GoDaddy, but am destitute. Anyone who would like to send me a few bucks, I'll guarantee it's used only for this transfer.

          • by Anonymous Coward on Sunday December 25, 2011 @03:28PM (#38489726)

            Yesterday, I figured I'll just leave my 15 domains there since they backed off their support.. but apparently only in words.

            No offense, but this is an example of how gullible people can be and how easy it can be to manipulate them. Say some pretty words and people will continue mindlessly giving you money to erode their own freedoms with. I wish more people understood the ideas behind public relations and marketing. But let's go over it again: you can't trust what corporations say to you. They will always make statements that stand to gain them the most favor, whether the statements are true or not.

            One has to actually use one's brain a little. Why would GoDaddy support SOPA, and then less than 24 hours later NOT support it? Do you think it's because they all changed their minds over there for some reason? Do you think they learned something new about SOPA they didn't know before? Or is it because they saw a pending backlash on the internet and wanted to release a bullshit statement that would satiate the docile among us? Do you really think they "backed off their support"? This is not difficult to figure out with a little bit of thought.

            • by SlithyMagister (822218) on Sunday December 25, 2011 @04:56PM (#38490142)

              They will always make statements that stand to gain them the most favor, whether the statements are true or not.

              You're close. Corporations say and do that which will gain them the most money. They exist solely for the purpose of returning value to their shareholders.
              If currying favour with the general public will gain them money, then they will do that. However, if pissing off the 90% will help them mine hordes of cash from the pockets of the other 10%, they will gladly do so.

              Corporations are not moral entities -- they are devoid of conscience. Even the individuals who comprise the corporation must give secondary consideration to moral issues where they conflict with the primary purpose of making money.

              Corporations must never consider an individual's circumstances -- not customers', not employees' nor even individual shareholders' -- all are subject to the overwhelming need to maximize return on investment.

              One might argue that the extreme compensation paid to corporate executives violates this, but in those cases is it usually the extreme greed of the individuals involved, coupled with extreme manipulative behaviour that have convinced shareholders that such compensation will maximize their own return on investment.

              In such a context, only greedy psychopaths remain eligible to inherit the American dream.

          • That's great... Yesterday, I figured I'll just leave my 15 domains there since they backed off their support.. but apparently only in words.

            This is not aimed at you personally, but I just have to get it off my chest: if by now you still haven't figured out that GoDaddy aren't the Good Guys, then I don't know why SOPA would change your mind. Seriously. It isn't like the GoDaddy badness isn't well documented or hasn't been going on for years. It's like they're _trying_ to be the most evil they can be.

      • follow the money.

        isn't it always the way to understanding things, today?

        I also suspect that they stand to make money from government, in some undisclosed ways. just a hunch, but anyone who cozies up to a gov deal is on the take.

        things that look like ducks *are* ducks.

        now that they've shown their colors, hopefully people will stay away from their business. ...almost like, well, an invisible hand (lol)

    • by 0100010001010011 (652467) on Sunday December 25, 2011 @02:31PM (#38489406)

      GoDaddy helped write the legislation such that they are exempt from it.

      Rep. Jared Polis (D-CO), the only member of Congress present at the hearing with any tech experience, having founded several web companies, introduced two amendments: one to exclude universities and non-profits from being subject do having to shut down their own domain servers if accused of piracy under SOPA, and the other to exempt dynamic IP addresses, such as those found on web-enabled printers. Both were voted down.

      Polis pointed out that SOPA and Smith’s amendment already excluded certain operators of sub-domains, such as GoDaddy.com, from being subject to shutdowns under SOPA.

      “If companies like GoDaddy.com are exempt, why aren’t non-commercial domain servers exempt?” Polis asked.

      • by Skidborg (1585365) on Sunday December 25, 2011 @03:12PM (#38489642)
        Someone needs to go and burn down the Capital building already.
        • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

          by BlueStrat (756137)

          Someone needs to go and burn down the Capital building already.

          I've been puzzled from the beginning as to why the OWS protesters aren't in front of the Capitol and the White House. They're the ones ultimately responsible for Wall Street corruption, because it necessarily requires a corrupt government in order to exist and grow.

          For corruption to flourish in the private sector requires a corrupt government, for only with a corrupt government can the corrupt businesses and individuals be protected from the People and Justice.

          Strat

          • by PopeRatzo (965947) * on Sunday December 25, 2011 @04:55PM (#38490136) Homepage Journal

            They're the ones ultimately responsible for Wall Street corruption, because it necessarily requires a corrupt government in order to exist and grow.

            That's kind of dumb. Do you think government is corrupting Wall Street, or is Wall Street's money corrupting government?

            The whole thing is solved by a simple set of campaign finance rules. Publicly-funded campaigns. Take the money out of politics, and you'd be surprised how quickly things turn around. But as long as a very few people have all the power and money, they will be the ones in charge of government. When it takes $50 million to become a senator, and only corporations can donate really big money, guess what? corporations are going to have the power. The structure of our government is not corrupt. With sufficient will, every single elected office can change hands within 7 short years.

            If there's a problem, look to your neighbors. Look to yourself. Somebody is electing these turds. As far as I can tell, there is only one US senator that doesn't take corporate money and he's a socialist. Maybe there are some congressmen who don't take corporate money, I don't know, but if there are, it's only a very few.

            If OWS is going to focus on any government building, it should be the United States Supreme Court, that sold off the last shreds of good government with one decision. Maybe go directly to the homes of Scalia, Thomas, Alito, Kennedy, Roberts.

            • by hedwards (940851)

              The GOP would never go for it though, and unless the Democrats get enough votes for cloture they couldn't get it through the Senate. Not that the Democrats are necessarily any better, but the GOP is primarily in charge of looking out for the rich regardless of what it does to the country.

            • by Phanatic1a (413374) on Sunday December 25, 2011 @05:46PM (#38490344)

              Do you think government is corrupting Wall Street, or is Wall Street's money corrupting government?

              That's a false dichotomy; the interest swings both ways.

              But the fundamental problem is that the government has the power to do this sort of thing. So long as it has that power, it will be attractive for corporations to influence it in order to seek rents. Doesn't matter whether you make the money train more opaque, doesn't matter what limits you set: if buying and selling are controlled by legislation, the first thing that's going to be bought and sold are the legislators.

              • Typical libertarian anti-logic. "If we attempt to control corporations with regulations the regulators will be bought off, thereby letting corporations do whatever they want. So we should just eliminate all legislation which somehow prevents corporations from doing whatever they want...".
            • by CrimsonAvenger (580665) on Sunday December 25, 2011 @06:25PM (#38490514)

              Take the money out of politics, and you'd be surprised how quickly things turn around.

              There are ~3.6 trillion reasons why this will not work.

              Hint: as long as there are 532 people divvying up $3.6 trillion, there are going to be people willing to spend millions (or billions) to "influence" those 532 people for a piece of that $3.6 trillion pie.

              Face it, spending a BILLION dollars to buy a couple percent of the Federal Budget is a bargain. And realistically, it doesn't cost anywhere near that much to buy Congresscritters.

          • by Hatta (162192) on Sunday December 25, 2011 @05:12PM (#38490212) Journal

            Because the seat of power in the US is not in fact in Washington DC, but in corporate boardrooms.

  • by sup2100 (996095) on Sunday December 25, 2011 @02:12PM (#38489262)
    Gotta love statistics
  • Maybe (Score:5, Informative)

    by chill (34294) on Sunday December 25, 2011 @02:13PM (#38489270) Journal

    This might have something to do with the fact that Go Daddy sucks as a registrar. The whole SOPA thing was just the last straw.

  • Democracy. (Score:5, Insightful)

    by TehNoobTrumpet (1836716) on Sunday December 25, 2011 @02:14PM (#38489278)
    Voting with your wallets is much more effective then the fake choice presented in elections. Hopefully, people will finally realize that in today's world, it's the best way to start making a difference.
    • Re:Democracy. (Score:5, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward on Sunday December 25, 2011 @02:19PM (#38489312)

      good thing everyone has the same number of votes in their wallets.

      democracy.

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward

      Voting with your wallets is much more effective then the fake choice presented in elections.

      That depends on how fat your wallet is.

    • Re:Democracy. (Score:5, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward on Sunday December 25, 2011 @02:27PM (#38489370)

      Voting with your wallets is much more effective then the fake choice presented in elections. Hopefully, people will finally realize that in today's world, it's the best way to start making a difference.

      No. You do both. My New Year wish for the world is actually that also Americans would bother to turn up and vote at an election. Instead of giving up before even trying, and by that handing the control over to the people who do bother. And if the result shouldn't be perfect the first time, you turn up even stronger next time. The politicans who want to keep their seat will start to get the message.

      In a democracy the poor will have more power than the rich, because there are more of them, and the will of the majority is supreme. ~Aristotle
      Bad officials are elected by good citizens who do not vote. ~George Jean Nathan
      I'm tired of hearing it said that democracy doesn't work. Of course it doesn't work. We are supposed to work it. ~Alexander Woollcott
      People often say that, in a democracy, decisions are made by a majority of the people. Of course, that is not true. Decisions are made by a majority of those who make themselves heard and who vote - a very different thing. ~Walter H. Judd

      • Re:Democracy. (Score:4, Informative)

        by next_ghost (1868792) on Sunday December 25, 2011 @03:03PM (#38489608)

        I'm tired of hearing it said that democracy doesn't work. Of course it doesn't work. We are supposed to work it. ~Alexander Woollcott

        This is the first most important thing to remember about democracy. The second most important thing to remember is that it's not anywhere near enough to just vote once every few years. Votes are not blank cheques for politicians. You have the right to check up on your elected representatives and the right to complain loudly if they misappropriate government money or do evil. Your duty as a citizen is to use both of those rights.

      • Re:Democracy. (Score:4, Interesting)

        by lightknight (213164) on Sunday December 25, 2011 @03:14PM (#38489652) Homepage

        If you want a larger turnout for the elections, you need to offer better candidates; many people stay at home because they despise the choices offered to them.

        There should be a constitutional amendment that states if less than 50% of eligible voters show up to vote, the election cannot be held as valid; elections must be held again, 3 months later, with an entirely new slate of candidates.

        • Re:Democracy. (Score:5, Insightful)

          by Daniel Dvorkin (106857) on Sunday December 25, 2011 @03:38PM (#38489768) Homepage Journal

          If you want a larger turnout for the elections, you need to offer better candidates; many people stay at home because they despise the choices offered to them.

          Again, the solution to this is to work harder. Don't just wait until the general election; get involved in the primaries. And don't just concentrate on the big-ticket races (President, Governor, US Senator and Representative); pay attention to races for state legislature, city council, board of education, county commissioner, etc. The only way we're going to get better candidates is if more people pay attention to the process by which candidates are made. By the time the Tuesday after the first Monday in November rolls around, it's too late.

    • by erroneus (253617)

      That's a great point so long as the contents of your wallet are actually worth something... Get my meaning?

    • Re:Democracy. (Score:4, Interesting)

      by TheGratefulNet (143330) on Sunday December 25, 2011 @03:27PM (#38489720)

      sorry, but while you are correct; its not effective anymore.

      people (especially in a down econ) are mostly going to be voting for the CHEAPEST short-term solution they can find for the problem they are solving.

      no one invests for long-term. no one buys higher quality today when they can buy walmart chinese shit for 'so much less'.

      go to a coupon/deals site like slickdeals or fatwallet. see the mentality of 'todays youth'. see how the near total lack of morality in shopping is abundant in their consumer group. point out how evil a company is and you are made fun of. point out how an item will break so shortly after you buy it and they reply 'yeah, but its only a few dollars!'.

      they don't get it.

      we are so screwed....

    • Re:Democracy. (Score:5, Insightful)

      by Asphalt (529464) on Monday December 26, 2011 @12:02AM (#38491974)
      Contrary to popular belief, democracy can never truly work. At least not for a large population.

      In order for democracy to work, the populace must be of sufficient intellect to make the best decisions for itself. The masses cannot do this, and this reality is unchangeable.

      That which we call "critical" or "abstract" thinking generally requires an IQ of 110 or greater. The average IQ of the U.S. citizen is 98. This means that the majority of Americans have an IQ of less than 100. Those with IQs of less than 100 tend to make decisions based on repetition and consensus rather than critical analysis, and even "smart" people have a difficult time resisting the lure of basing conclusions on "common knowledge".

      As such, people can be fairly easily persuaded to vote against their own interests time, and time, and time again.

      Democracy as a means of preventing tyranny and corruption is fairly useless, for democracy is 3 geniuses, 20 bright people, and 500 idiots voting on a course of action. The numbers are made up, but you get the gist, and they are probably not far off. When someone with an IQ of 65 has an equal influence on important matters as does a person with an IQ of 140, the Achilles heel of of democracy becomes evident.

      A benevolent dictatorship, to whatever extent one can truly exist, would be a far better, more fair, more efficient, more humane form of government than is democracy.

      GoDaddy will be fine, because even though Slashdotters know what SOPA is, 90% of people have no clue as to what is going on.

      Despite nearly 18 months of seeming outrage over the TSA's backscatter and groping, airline travel was up this holiday season. Bloggers and talking heads were pissed, but Joe and Jane Soccermom remained oblivious. Were it put to a vote tomorrow, the TSA's groping policy would be overwhelmingly approved by American voters.

      Similarly, when SOPA or a SOPA-like law is passed, and it will be, Slashdot will blow up with comments, but the legislators who pass it will be re-elected without issue.

      3 geniuses, 20 bright people, 500 idiots.

      The government will once again act against the interest of the citizens, while 3 people scream, 20 people complain on Slashdot, and 500 people watch Monday Night Football.

      Democracy. It doesn't work.

      It never did.

      It never will.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Sunday December 25, 2011 @02:18PM (#38489300)

    I can only hope that when more and more special interests begin to require that their support of some law mustn't be made public, the politicians taking the money stop for a second and think about what the hell they're doing.

    BWHAHAA. As if! Man, sometimes I kill myself.

    Carry on, corrupt entities.

  • Significant? (Score:5, Interesting)

    by Anonymous Coward on Sunday December 25, 2011 @02:19PM (#38489310)

    How significant is this? I don't know how to read this data, but TFA itself seems to note that almost as many domains transferred in on the same day, and it says here [dailychanges.com] that they manage some 32 million domains, so that really doesn't seem like much. Can't find any historical data, though, so I don't know if it's outside the norm for daily activity... is it?

  • GoDaddy controls around 45 million domains. So this is about 1/2000 of all their domains. Not that much by that metric. But what probably caused a notice is that this is a much larger variance than what normally occurs on any given day. And some of these domains were domains which were using affiliated services.
    • Customers tend to stick with a single domain registrar for decades, so 21,000 domains is millions of dollars in lost revenue, in just one day. If they continued to support SOPA it would have really hurt.

      And that doesn't even take into account all the customers who're too lazy to switch existing domains, but will switch for future ones.

      You can bet godaddy will think twice before supporting anything like SOPA ever again.

      • Re:Total control (Score:4, Informative)

        by naroom (1560139) on Sunday December 25, 2011 @02:28PM (#38489392)

        If they continued to support SOPA it would have really hurt.

        They DID continue to support SOPA. They just released some damage-control PR saying they weren't supporting it as strongly.

      • Except they do still support it. Their carefully-worded PR piece and their CEO's blog both say exactly that.

      • Customers tend to stick with a single domain registrar for decades,

        It hasn't been that long since there were multiple places to register a domain.
    • by Baloroth (2370816)
      Also, the official "move your domain day" was the 29th IIRC, so while this could be an insignificant blip, it might be an indicator of how many will move later.
    • Yes, just 1/2000. But when you know how companies work, you know they're probably still crapping their pants over it.

      Companies have to grow to make their shareholders and investors happy. Stagnation is an alarm bell. Shrinking is a "gimme my money back NOW" indicator. No matter how small.

      Especially in times like this when investors are at a hair trigger already.

  • by chrisgeleven (514645) on Sunday December 25, 2011 @02:24PM (#38489344) Homepage

    This # doesn't include any domains transferred away from GoDaddy that were delegated to non-GoDaddy nameservers. The 21,000 number is only for domains that used GoDaddy's nameservers for DNS. So the actual # was higher than 21,000.

    The question is what is the real number of transferred away domains? I don't know if any of those statistics are available publicly.

  • Seriously? If this is tracked I'd love to know that this is significant in some way and not just a blip...

  • Misleading summary (Score:5, Informative)

    by SuperMog2002 (702837) on Sunday December 25, 2011 @02:28PM (#38489390)
    According to the article, GoDaddy lost 21,054, but they also gained 20,034, for a net loss of 1020. Given their scale, that doesn't exactly sound like a massive exodus. Also, without any further information, for all we know, this is just a regular day of churn that happened to end negative.
  • Spellchecking (Score:2, Offtopic)

    by Knave75 (894961)
    Seriously, this is a high traffic site. A two-line summary should not contain two spelling mistakes.

    Were != Where

    And, "Daddy" has a suprisingly large number of D's
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward

      What does "suprisingly" mean?

  • GoDaddy... (Score:4, Funny)

    by forkfail (228161) on Sunday December 25, 2011 @02:37PM (#38489436)

    ... is now GoFsckYourselfDaddy

  • I am in up to my eyeballs at Godaddy. Who has similar prices and services that are worth changing to?
    • by Solandri (704621)

      I am in up to my eyeballs at Godaddy. Who has similar prices and services that are worth changing to?

      I was searching for Godaddy alternatives yesterday.

      At a similar price, the registrars which consistently came up were namecheap.com, name.com, and surprisingly dreamhost.com (not for their features, but because they include whois privacy in their regular price). I think all these are resellers though (enom kept coming up as their registrar).

      In terms of features and support, gandi.net and hover.com se

  • A successful boycott (Score:4, Interesting)

    by J'raxis (248192) on Sunday December 25, 2011 @02:43PM (#38489488) Homepage

    Serves them right.

    On the one hand, this is a great example of a successful boycott: GoDaddy committed an egregious action which generated so many complaints, threats of monetary loss, and now 21,000 examples of actual loss, that GoDaddy did a complete about-face and dropped support of SOPA.

    On the other hand, this company has committed so many egregious and unethical actions over their lifetime (anyone else remember NoDaddy.com?) that I would rather see them lose so much business that they go out of business. If I hadn't already moved my domains off of them after one of their earlier outrages [slashdot.org], I'd still move them off now, even though they turned around on SOPA. Let their flaming wreckage be an example to other domain registrars.

  • Your customer base are people who own and maintain a website - not the general idiotic public.

    And you're pretty much supporting something which goes against what they believe in.

    What did they expect would happen?

  • by Twinbee (767046) on Sunday December 25, 2011 @03:04PM (#38489612) Homepage
    This news has been over Reddit and apparently has been discredited. 25,000 is apparently very low in this industry, and is therefore a joke. The real number is much higher. For the latest info, follow this story and listen to samzdaman who seems to know his stuff: http://www.reddit.com/r/technology/comments/nq17m/godaddy_has_actually_lost_one_million_1000000/ [reddit.com] To quote him:

    GoDaddy accounts for 30% of all domain registrations, and there are, on average, 27K .com domains registered PER DAY.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Sunday December 25, 2011 @03:12PM (#38489644)

    1) If you take a look at godaddy New domains, they are mostly spam, malware or ad pages, and most are registered by one or a small number of people in China.
    2) Transfers into godaddy are mostly bulk transfers from Chinese registrars.
    3) Transfers out are also mostly spam/malware/ad pages, and are going to Chinese registrars.

    The chinese connection is not a coincidence. I will bet money that those Chiese registrars are either controlled by Godaddy or have a sweetheart deal with them to either game ICAAN or the numbers.

    Either way those numbers are misleading at domaincontrol and cannot be trusted.

  • by Kogun (170504) on Sunday December 25, 2011 @06:51PM (#38490656)

    So where is the browser plugin to allow me to boycott the websites STILL using GoDaddy for their domain hosting?

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