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2012 and the Technology Blahs 130

Posted by timothy
from the end-of-the-world-nigh-monetize-now-now-now dept.
Velcroman1 writes "Generally, at the end of the year, predictions stream forth as to how this or that new technology will transform the world in the next 12 months. Just before Christmas, IBM announced computerized mind reading was just around the corner — sometime after 2017, that is. But on the whole, experts and analysts don't see a whole lot of innovation coming out of the U.S. anytime soon. Instead, they see sluggishness. 'We'll have to wait for consumer spending to go up before the 'flying surfboard' arrives,' said Chris Stephenson, co-founder of Seattle consulting firm ARRYVE. 'Bigger innovation labs and companies are holding back on numerous innovations until they can properly monetize them.'"
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2012 and the Technology Blahs

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  • by earls (1367951) on Tuesday December 27, 2011 @02:07PM (#38504834)

    Invent a flying surfboard.

  • by Animats (122034) on Tuesday December 27, 2011 @02:11PM (#38504900) Homepage

    Marketing speak decoded:

    • "Push notifications" -> ads rammed up your ass
    • "Apps" for browsers -> pay per view content
    • "HTML5 ads" -> ads take over the whole screen.
    • "Facebook will be seamlessly integrated into the desktop" -> all your info belongs to us
  • by gmuslera (3436) * on Tuesday December 27, 2011 @02:14PM (#38504946) Homepage Journal
    People that try to innovate get sued, or stopped by widely broad patents/copyrights, promising new technologies never see the light (remember sixthsense?) because "something" gets in the middle.

    A few recent examples just in the Android field were that android device makers have to pay Microsoft because using/suporting the fat filesystem, Oracle suing Google for using Java, Samsung get their tablets out of the market because their dimensions looks a bit like the ipad ones. Not saying that it was the example of innovation and new ideas in computing, but the kind of unbreakable barriers our current civilization built to stop any try to build a future.
  • by grimmjeeper (2301232) on Tuesday December 27, 2011 @02:16PM (#38504986)

    That's all I need. A browser that gives away all of my personal information so that advertising creeps can push sell a lot of crap on top of the web pages I'm trying to view. And on top of that it's going to make me use a very clunky "touchscreen" style user interface full of downloadable craplets rather than taking advantage of the keyboard and mouse that my desktop has always had.

    Call my cynical but I really see all of this as the web going downhill. Sure, there are great new technologies that can make things better. But as with any tool, it depends on how you use it. In this case, it's not being used to make anything better.

    Oh yea, I almost forgot the obligatory "get off my lawn" statement...

  • by DoofusOfDeath (636671) on Tuesday December 27, 2011 @02:17PM (#38504994)

    The risk of being sued for patent infringement is sufficiently high to prevent me from bothering. I wonder how unique I am in this regard.

  • by DoofusOfDeath (636671) on Tuesday December 27, 2011 @02:35PM (#38505204)

    The risk of being sued for patent infringement is sufficiently high to prevent me from bothering. I wonder how unique I am in this regard.

    Not very. I have five patent plaques on the wall behind me. For me, the risk is not being able to collect for infringement because of high litigation costs.

    Bigger risk is if something I invented actually became significantly profitable. Then any well-funded corporation or troll with an overly broad patent could come after me, and I couldn't afford to defend myself.

    And, if you could persuade a patent troll that your patent applied, I expect you'd be tempted to let them buy it from you so they could come after me.

  • by erroneus (253617) on Tuesday December 27, 2011 @02:47PM (#38505346) Homepage

    In the beginning it's free or really cheap... then you get hooked on it and then the costs keep going up. Are you like 18 or have you not noticed this general trend where the consumer is concerned?

    If there is a way to exploit the consumer with technology, they have ALWAYS done so. Everything you do, everything you see, everything you eat, every breath you take, every move you make... it's worth something to someone and they will always do everything they can get away with to capitalize on it. The only areas which aren't being exploited are either prohibited by law or new enough that they haven't yet figured out how to best exploit.

  • by NeutronCowboy (896098) on Tuesday December 27, 2011 @03:24PM (#38505698)

    Are you like 18 or have you not noticed this general trend where the consumer is concerned?

    Are you like 18 that you have no self-control or disposable income? I have about 40-60 apps on my Android. I paid for exactly one, because it was a non-trivial app that I use every day, for at least an hour to two hours. The rest are all free. Exactly one comes with ads, and I only have it because it's a fun game to play with friends (I won't mention the game because I don't want to give extra publicity to the game, and because I don't want to admit that I actually support the company via ads).

    Do some research on what you use, and you can live a nice, uncluttered life filled with useful apps that don't cost you a dime. And if you do find a particularly nice one, do the right thing and donate.

    Then the poor schmucks making the app won't have to turn to the dark side to make a living.

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