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MPAA Chief Dodd Hints At Talks To Revive SOPA 279

Posted by samzenpus
from the they're-back dept.
suraj.sun writes "Christopher Dodd, the former Connecticut senator who now leads the MPAA, hasn't given up on his dream of censoring the Internet. In an interview with Hollywood Reporter, he said that Hollywood and the technology industry 'need to come to an understanding' about new copyright legislation. Dodd said that there were 'conversations going on now,' about SOPA-style legislation, but that he was 'not going to go into more detail because obviously if I do, it becomes counterproductive.' Asked whether the White House's decision to oppose SOPA had created tensions with Hollywood, Dodd insisted that he was 'not going to revisit the events of last winter,' but said he hoped the president would use his 'good relationships' with both Hollywood and the technology industry to broker a deal."
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MPAA Chief Dodd Hints At Talks To Revive SOPA

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  • by Anonymous Coward on Thursday April 05, 2012 @07:54PM (#39592801)

    LOL! American Freedom!

    • by cpu6502 (1960974) on Thursday April 05, 2012 @09:44PM (#39593575)

      There's a reason out of thousands of innate natural rights, the Founding Fathers decided to include guns as one of the top 10. No not for hunting. For self-defense. Both of yourself and your fellow compatriots.

      We haven't hit that stage yet, but we're getting very very close. If they start rounding-up Americans and throwing them in jail without trial (NDAA), I'm running for office. I'm fed up. And if they start executing americans.....

      Let's just say the 2nd amendment is the only right left that I have not exercised. But that will change. Time to follow the example of our fellow human beings in Egypt. Libya. Eastern Europe. And the original 14 states (including Vermont).

      • by Anonymous Coward on Thursday April 05, 2012 @09:52PM (#39593609)

        Why hasn't the MPAA been declared an illegal price-fixing conspiracy under RICO statutes yet? They've been convicted of price fixing TWICE...

        • by Anonymous Coward on Thursday April 05, 2012 @10:21PM (#39593843)

          Why hasn't the MPAA been declared an illegal price-fixing conspiracy under RICO statutes yet? They've been convicted of price fixing TWICE...

          Because they buy off the politicians.

        • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

          by kheldan (1460303)
          Why hasn't the Catholic Church been declared a conspiracy to aid and abet child molestors? The reason is emm-oh-enn-ee-why, that's what. The MPAA, rotting from within or not, still has a shit-ton of money, and they're happy to toss it around to try to get what they want -- and so far they're fairly effective at it.
      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by NeutronCowboy (896098)

        Yes, because the US of today is like Libya, Egypt, Yugoslavia and the colonies in America circa 1700. And Obama and Bush are like Ghaddafi, Mubarak, Tito and King George I. *roll eyes* I'm always wildly amused by the type of hyperbole that is coming from some people in the US public. To some extent, it shows exactly how little they know about the world, and even about their own government. On the other hand, it also shows just how frighteningly violent they are.

        Good thing that entertainment in the US is hi

      • by Anonymous Coward on Friday April 06, 2012 @04:20AM (#39595411)

        There's a reason out of thousands of innate natural rights, the Founding Fathers decided to include guns as one of the top 10. No not for hunting. For self-defense. Both of yourself and your fellow compatriots.

        This works if there's no difference between one armed person and another. You no longer have parity.

        Allow me to repeat DavidTC's excellent post from http://science.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=346351&cid=21193115 [slashdot.org]

        Contents:

        Have fun in your little made-up universe where the government comes to round you up and you manage to fight it off.

        In the real world, fascism is when the corporations and governments work as a single entity, and you can wander around with your fucking gun all you want. In fact, you'll have to wander around, because the government/corporations took your house and your car, and no one will hire you.

        At which point you'll be arrested, not as some big anti-government hero by jackboot thugs, but for stealing bread to live on, by a perfectly normal cop who's just doing his job, a job that absolutely no one except you disagrees with, so when you shoot and kill him you're getting the electric chair and no one thinks you're a hero at all.

        There are different types of totalitarian governments, and assuming a fascist one operates like a communist one is faulty. Fascist governments don't put troops in the streets...they work with corporations to make sure 'the wrong sort of people' do not have any economic power, and do not have anywhere to peddle their ideas.

        Modern fascist states don't even bother to kill those people, and pretending they're going to show up in some stormtrooper outfit and start a gun battle with you is insane. They'll show up with a court order to evict you from your home because you failed to pay your mortgage, because pressure came from the top at your company to let you go. Or they'll just sue you and ruin your finances.

        America is not a bunch of tiny castles where, as long as you can hold off the invading armies, you will be fine. The idea that that is how the world works is astonishingly naive. Almost all the population of America lives in housing they do not fully own, they get food from places they do not control like the supermarket, they require operating in society for money to obtain said food and shelter, a society where economics are controlled by some very large players that can crush them like bugs.

        And a fascist state isn't going to 'assume control', you asshat. There's not going to some insane coup, there's a going to be a slow change, which has, in fact, already happened, or have you not looked at the telecom immunity stuff? That's classic fascism. The government breaks the law, the government gets private companies to break the law, the government gives said companies huge amounts of cash, the government attempts to make such behavior legal retroactively. We've got government officials and AT&T officers leaping back and forth between each other in an incestuous loop. Your government spying on you, sponsored by AT&T. It's not 'totalitarian' yet, as evidenced by the fact Democrats managed to stop the immunity, but it is fascism, at least the start of it. (And the same thing's happened with Blackwater.)

        Oh, and before you start ranting about gun control some more, be forewarned I'm against it. I'm just not stupid enough to think that the US government being slowly corrupted by business is something that can be fought off with gunpowder. Guns are useful to deter crime and to deter invasion. They aren't useful against a corrupt government in any meaningful way.

  • My goodness (Score:5, Interesting)

    by Sigvatr (1207234) on Thursday April 05, 2012 @07:55PM (#39592811)
    What motivates this man to be so evil?
    • by Anonymous Coward on Thursday April 05, 2012 @08:17PM (#39592987)
      He's liberal.
      • Re:My goodness (Score:5, Insightful)

        by andydread (758754) on Thursday April 05, 2012 @08:38PM (#39593117)
        Yes but the person that introduced SOPA is a staunch conservative....Lamar Smith (R-Tx) Yeah Texas no less. So we have a liberal from Ct and a Conservative from Tx What exactly is your point?
        • Re:My goodness (Score:5, Insightful)

          by an unsound mind (1419599) on Thursday April 05, 2012 @08:55PM (#39593231)

          The common factor is that they are both filthy rich and consider themselves far too poor.

        • by Freddybear (1805256) on Thursday April 05, 2012 @09:43PM (#39593569)

          http://www.tomsguide.com/us/REddit-TestPAC-SOPA-PIPA-Lamar-Smith,news-14720.html [tomsguide.com]

          "What better way to kill the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) bill for good than to nuke its author right out of Congress? That's what a group of Reddit users are trying to do after forming a Political Action Committee, or PAC. They want Rep. Lamar Smith (R-TX.) booted out of office, and will do everything they can to see it happen."

          If they succeed in booting Smith in the primary, that should put some fear into others who might otherwise support SOPA/PIPA style legislation.

          • by rtb61 (674572) on Thursday April 05, 2012 @11:15PM (#39594191) Homepage

            The only way to stop it for good, is to destroy the industries that bright it into being. They will never stop, insane psychopathic greed drove them to seek ways to censor and shutdown the peoples version of the internet so they could create an eighties version of mass media on it instead.

            That kind of sick thinking doesn't stop until the people behind it and then people behind them have lost all the power.

            We will be fighting the SOPA battle for the next decade at least and possibly longer. They spend years perverting the news, they spent billions buying up control and they still lie on those mass media channels day in and day out. Fox not-News is just the very worst example, not just the only one spreading corporate propaganda as news.

            • by Freddybear (1805256) on Friday April 06, 2012 @07:36AM (#39595975)

              "The price of freedom is eternal vigilance."

            • The only way to stop it for good, is to destroy the industries that bright it into being. They will never stop, insane psychopathic greed drove them to seek ways to censor and shutdown the peoples version of the internet so they could create an eighties version of mass media on it instead.

              Exactly. The problem is that the MPAA, RIAA, etc... have to admit that the current and future state of technology has made their business model as obsolete as a buggy whip maker. It is time to move on. It is time for cop

      • What is it about liberal ideology that makes us want to align with a group of large corporations to screw over large numbers of individuals just to line the pockets of said corporations? I thought liberals were bad people for doing precisely the opposite. Make up your minds!
      • Re:My goodness (Score:5, Insightful)

        by ohnocitizen (1951674) on Thursday April 05, 2012 @09:40PM (#39593547)
        Actually, he's conservative. Most modern Democrats are conservative, or centrist. If you want a liberal Democrat, look at Elizabeth Warren, Al Franken, or Russ Feingold.
        • Re:My goodness (Score:5, Insightful)

          by fnj (64210) on Thursday April 05, 2012 @09:58PM (#39593643)

          For God's sake, stop falling for the tired old left-right lie they've been foisting upon us. It's not about left-right, liberal-conservative, or whatever other obfuscation the bastards want you to believe in. It's about the corporate state vs individual liberty. Some D's are OK and some R's are OK. The rest are in the bag.

          When and if this dawns on enough people, it's Katie bar the door. It will be the end of the evil empire and they know it.

          • Re:My goodness (Score:5, Insightful)

            by Anonymous Coward on Thursday April 05, 2012 @10:38PM (#39593959)

            Should've been clear as day to people when Bush started the Wall St. bailouts and then Obama continued them! What more do people need to see to realize what's going on? The parties are the same! They try to distract you with little non-economic trivialities like abortion or gay marriage but when it comes to looting the economy they are both the same.

    • Re:My goodness (Score:5, Insightful)

      by hondo77 (324058) on Thursday April 05, 2012 @08:24PM (#39593035) Homepage
      The usual suspects: money and power.
    • My guess is that he has a thing for green pieces of paper with pictures of dead men and numbers printed on them.
    • Genes perhaps? (Score:5, Informative)

      by danwiz (538108) on Thursday April 05, 2012 @09:31PM (#39593475)

      Senator Thomas J. Dodd Memorial Stadium is a minor league baseball stadium in Connecticut. It was named after a Senator who was censured in 1967 for converting campaign funds to his personal accounts and spending the money.

      That's Christopher Dodd's father. [wikipedia.org] And the memorial stadium was built in 1995 during Chris Dodd's tenure as a Senator. Senator Chris Dodd has had his share of scandals [wikipedia.org] too.

      Something about apples not falling too far from the tree comes to mind.

    • by c0lo (1497653)

      What motivates this man to be so evil?

      This is not half that evil as others... watch out [digitaltrends.com] CIPSA [eff.org]

  • by kungfuj35u5 (1331351) on Thursday April 05, 2012 @07:56PM (#39592835)

    Spit out plain and simple bribed legislation I don't know what does.

  • Yawn... (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Black Parrot (19622) on Thursday April 05, 2012 @07:57PM (#39592843)

    The *AA will keep sponsoring legislation until they get what they want. Then they'll decide they want more.

    News, indeed.

  • CISPA (Score:5, Interesting)

    by Anonymous Coward on Thursday April 05, 2012 @08:01PM (#39592857)

    I believe the current bill trying to snake its way into US law is CISPA:
    http://kat.ph/blog/GreenPirate/post/1774/ [kat.ph]

    • I have a solution. Let's (all) stop looking for bugs and security issues in software; the problem will then quietly attend to itself.

  • Obviously (Score:3, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Thursday April 05, 2012 @08:03PM (#39592885)

    If I tell the people about the legislation I am crafting there will be outrage. So don't tell anyone. Obviously.

    • Re:Obviously (Score:5, Insightful)

      by Riceballsan (816702) on Thursday April 05, 2012 @08:25PM (#39593039)
      Sounds about right, They felt the system failed them last time, because major webpages actually told the public what was being planned. The goal the next round is going to be to figure out how to slip it in without anyone who actually understands it getting a voice. It still cracks me up how with SOPA, the most common statement from the congressmen making the decision was "I'm not a computer nerd, so I don't understand how this works at all", that part was what the **AA's considered, the process as intended. The companies and people who were effected by it speaking up and making sure that the ramifications of it were understood, that was an "abuse of power".
  • In MPAA-speak... (Score:5, Informative)

    by sconeu (64226) on Thursday April 05, 2012 @08:07PM (#39592919) Homepage Journal

    "Broker a deal" means "Bend over and take whatever we give you"

  • by russotto (537200) on Thursday April 05, 2012 @08:10PM (#39592935) Journal

    You'd think the guy could at least try to resist the temptation to sound like he's in a mob movie. Unless that's part of the draw of the whole being evil thing.

    • He had to say "come to an understanding." He was unwilling to pay the licensing costs 'to make them an offer they can't refuse.'
  • by FridayBob (619244) on Thursday April 05, 2012 @08:13PM (#39592957) Homepage
    ... the fact that we can't resist buying his shit is what gives him the money to keep trying to censor our Internet.
  • Why we fail (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Thursday April 05, 2012 @08:17PM (#39592991)
    Copyright is the problem, it needs to be limited to 20 years. Only people should be allowed to own copyright. Businesses should only be allowed to lease copyright.
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by Shavano (2541114)

      Corporations are people my friend.

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by Anonymous Coward

        Corporations are people my friend.

        You know, I'm not a republican, but I gotta defend Romney on this one just because I absolutely hate when either side takes a quote out of context to make the other guys look bad. If you have to resort to fooling people instead of legitimately making a good argument, you don't have a leg to stand on.

        At the event in question, Romney was making the point that either we had to cut certain welfare programs or "raise taxes on people." It's a statement I agree with, but he argued that you shouldn't raise taxes,

    • Hollywood stepped off the moral high ground in 1998:

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Copyright_Term_Extension_Act [wikipedia.org]

      Until we're back to where we were in 1997 the copyright lobby won't get a dime from me. I hope they all go bankrupt and I'll do anything I can to help that happen.

      • by HiThere (15173)

        They had stepped off the moral high ground long before that. That was when they stopped even trying to pretend.

    • by chrismcb (983081)
      20 years is a good start but what stop issues like this.
      As for corporations not holding copyright, I don't understand why you think this is an issue or helps. Some things cost a lost of money to create. If we corporations can't hold copyright, then those things won't get created.
  • by ewhac (5844) on Thursday April 05, 2012 @08:19PM (#39593005) Homepage Journal

    In an interview with Hollywood Reporter, [Dodd] said that Hollywood and the technology industry 'need to come to an understanding' about new copyright legislation.

    Here's the understanding, Chris: Computers copy data. Period. End of novel; no sequel coming. It is a fact of the landscape that is not going to change.

    And that, as far as any clear-thinking technologist is concerned, is the end of the discussion. Business models must be constructed around this reality. (And if your business model is not based on reality, but instead on a la-la fairy land where every computer is under MPAA/RIAA/SPAA control, unsanctioned copies never happen, every view is metered, and directors and actors work for naught but "exposure"... Well, they have anti-psychotics that can help with that now.)

    BTW, anyone hoping to debate the merits of copyright policy is REQUIRED to read this speech by Thomas Babington Macaulay [kuro5hin.org] -- it will easily be among the most enlightening forty-odd minutes of your life.

    Schwab

    • by TubeSteak (669689)

      Here's the understanding, Chris: Computers copy data. Period. End of novel; no sequel coming. It is a fact of the landscape that is not going to change.

      It's also a fact of the landscape that to get online and function once you're there, most Americans go through very few gatekeepers/ways.
      Whether we're talking about ISPs, search engines, payment processors, file hosts, etc... there aren't actually that many.
      By attacking these gateways, the **AA can focus its power much more efficiently than if they were going after every American online.

      /And the money they spend on advocating this crap gets written off on their taxes, so it isn't a big loss to them.

    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward

      The thing is, if the *AAs actually acknowledged the new reality, and worked with it, rather than against it, they probably would be able stop almost all piracy. They won't ever make as much money as they used to, because the Internet allows us all to do our own distribution. Why should we pay extra for a separate media distribution service when we've got a perfectly effective one in the Inteternet?

      What we're seeing is the *AAs trying to cripple the Internet as a distribution medium because it encroaches o

    • Well, I read the Macaulay speech. And found that it had nothing to do with this particular discussion. In fact it could be construed to support the idea of copyright, in so far as that it recognized granting a monopoly to authors as the solution to seeing they are paid.

      "It is good that authors should be remunerated; and the least exceptionable way of remunerating them is by a monopoly. Yet monopoly is an evil. For the sake of the good we must submit to the evil; but the evil ought not to last a day longer t

      • by robot256 (1635039) on Thursday April 05, 2012 @10:09PM (#39593733)
        The point that Macaulay made is that while we can concede that copyrights must exist, it is mandatory that they have an end as well as a beginning. Any legislation enforcing copyright monopolies must enforce both the beginning and the end of copyright terms. Make the government responsible for prosecuting infringements upon the public domain and make the damages comparable to those awarded to infringement on private copyrights. Oh, and make the length of the terms short enough that there actually *is* an end. None of the copyright legislation in the last two decades, or indeed anyone in power, has mentioned enforcement of the public domain. Without a strong public domain, copyright becomes monopoly for monopoly's sake, rather than for the public good, and that is what makes it evil.
    • by dweller_below (136040) on Thursday April 05, 2012 @11:34PM (#39594317)
      Thanks for the link to Macaulay on Copyright. It is extremely relevant. His summation was amazingly prescient:

      "And you will find that, in attempting to impose unreasonable restraints on the reprinting of the works of the dead, you have, to a great extent, annulled those restraints which now prevent men from pillaging and defrauding the living."

      This is the modern copyright wars in a nutshell. Copyright can NOT exist in defiance of common sense. It must be reasonable or it will destroy our respect for the law. If we wish to continue as a lawful nation, we must restore reason to copyright.

      Reason would look like:

      • Copyright should last 20 years.
      • Things that can't be copied (IE works with effective technical copying restrictions) are not subject to copyright.
      • And, either no punishment for non-commercial copying or the punishment is limited to just the actual cost of buying a copy.

      But, when negotiating with a crazy opponent, you can't begin with reason.

      Our initial negotiating position must be:

      • Copyright is only granted to works submitted to the Library of Congress.
      • Mandatory licensing. Anybody can get a copy from the Library of Congress at any time for $1
      • Copyright duration is 5 years, with 1 renewal.

      Miles

  • Of course (Score:5, Insightful)

    by nine-times (778537) <nine.times@gmail.com> on Thursday April 05, 2012 @08:19PM (#39593009) Homepage

    Ok, in case you didn't know this, of course they're going to revive it. They're going to keep pushing it and keep pushing it until it goes through. You thought we beat it because it didn't pass that one time? What, did you think the entertainment industry ran out of money and stopped paying congressmen?

    They'll wait a little while, they'll rename it, they'll alter it to hide the more controversial aspects, and they'll wage a propaganda war. They will not stop trying to consolidate their power until they're ousted from power.

  • Moron (Score:5, Insightful)

    by WML MUNSON (895262) on Thursday April 05, 2012 @08:22PM (#39593021)
    Chris Dodd said that there were

    conversations going on now

    but that he was

    not going to go into more detail because obviously if I do, it becomes counterproductive.

    It becomes counterproductive because nobody fucking wants this, and the people you're "having discussions" with are probably corrupt.

    • by Shavano (2541114)

      Or he's trying like hell to corrupt them or bamboozle them into thinking MPAA's vision is a good idea and not a scheme that puts the utility of the internet at risk.

  • The New Deal (Score:4, Insightful)

    by MrKaos (858439) on Thursday April 05, 2012 @08:22PM (#39593025) Journal

    The technology industry wipes out the existing business model introducing a more efficient one, retaining only the creative elements that produces movies and music. That's what IT does.

    I mean evolving business models was the whole idea of capitalism in the first place, from memory.

  • by inode_buddha (576844) on Thursday April 05, 2012 @08:26PM (#39593049) Journal

    Lets everybody keep a sharp eye out for whatever the fuck they may be trying, and shout it down when it comes out again... just like SOPA.. again

  • by Cazekiel (1417893) on Thursday April 05, 2012 @08:30PM (#39593069)

    Voltaire says it best in 'When You're Evil' [youtube.com]...

    I'm the fly in your soup, I'm the pebble in your shoe
    I'm the pea beneath your bed, I'm a bump on every head
    ...

  • I guess corporate dollars and political motivation can't get spelled out much clearer than that. Anyway, there have been plenty of alternatives proposed to SOPA/PIPA. If he can't work with what's been proposed then he should be fired.

    • In this case, the title is honorary. Much like George Bush is still referred to as "President Bush" even though he isn't in the White House anymore, Senator Dodd is no longer a senator.

  • by windcask (1795642) on Thursday April 05, 2012 @08:33PM (#39593087) Homepage Journal

    We may disagree with you about social issues and government assistance, but you'd better believe we're your brothers in fucking arms when it comes to the overreach of Hollywood and big government censorship.
    http://townhall.com/tipsheet/kevinglass/2012/01/18/republicans_backing_off_internet_piracy_acts [townhall.com]
    http://www.buzzfeed.com/jpmoore/15-republicans-you-can-thank-for-bailing-on-sopap [buzzfeed.com]
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_US_Congresspersons_who_support_or_oppose_SOPA/PIPA [wikipedia.org]

    • We may disagree with you about social issues and government assistance, but you'd better believe we're your brothers in fucking arms when it comes to the overreach of Hollywood and big government censorship.

      Don't confuse being the "party of no" with being anti-MAFIAA.

      Take, for example Orrin Hatch [wikipedia.org] former republican senator from Utah and RIAA bitch.

      • by windcask (1795642)

        And don't confuse being a remember of the Republican party with being Conservative. Hatch is the quintessential old guard Republican, having been in office longer than half of the people reading this thread have been alive. He has massive lobbying interests in pharmaceuticals and other areas as well, not just the RIAA.

    • by Microlith (54737)

      No worries, we'll just wait for "conservatives" in Congress to back big oil, big coal, and other large industries.

  • It's time to organize a general boycott of the productions of their member companies. Can't you find some entertainment other than seeing the latest movie? I haven't bought a theater ticket in 10 years, and I do just fine. Most of their stuff these days is garbage anyway. The only way we are EVER going to be free of this tyranny is to deprive the members of the money they need to keep supporting it.
  • Chris Dodd (Score:2, Redundant)

    by cosm (1072588)
    Fuck that guy.
  • by mark-t (151149) <`markt' `at' `lynx.bc.ca'> on Thursday April 05, 2012 @08:47PM (#39593177) Journal

    As a Canadian, I'm torn between taking some sort of sadistic delight in seeing that the characteristic of elected representatives making decisions contrary to the electorate's desires is not a uniquely Canadian trait, and feeling genuine empathy for the USA in this situation.

    After careful consideration, I'll go with the latter. It's a more PC.

    I am Canadian, after all.

  • http://act.demandprogress.org/sign/new_sopa/ [demandprogress.org]

    Do sign, please. It may not help, but it can't hurt.

  • Maybe Chris Dodd needs to come to an understanding with a bucket of tar and a pile of feathers.

  • by blind biker (1066130) on Thursday April 05, 2012 @09:15PM (#39593373) Journal

    How much more explicitly should he say that he doesn't give a rat's ass about the general interest? Should he say "I poop on all you little folks!"

    I swear, Americans seem to just *love* these self-interested politicians.

  • "We &@$%ing own the executive branch! And we've already bribed Congress. Only nine more people to buy; five if we're not interested in a unanimous decision."
  • All the people that complained about special interest groups... well, this is what they're good for... EFF has been pretty good about fighting this stuff off in the past. And as time goes on this will be a bigger struggle.

    You can't ban special interests. You can only counter special interests with special interests. The abortion people fight each other. The gun people fight each other. And now we're going to have a war between the MPAA etc and the EFF etc.

    Bring it.

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