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The Internet Networking Upgrades IT

World IPv6 Launch Day Underway 236

Posted by Unknown Lamer
from the it's-finally-1999 dept.
A number of readers have written in with stories related to today's permanent rollout of IPv6 by several major organizations. From the looks of it, for the 1% or so of end users with IPv6 support, everything is going smoothly. For those not so lucky to have IPv6 already, an anonymous reader writes with (mostly) good news: 60% of ISPs intend to enable IPv6 by the end of 2012. For business users, darthcamaro provides some words of caution: "...the Chief Security Officer of VeriSign doesn't think IPv6 should be turned on by a whole lot of people. The problem is network security devices in many cases don't scan IPv6. So if you turn IPv6 on, you're screwed. 'If you don't have that visibility into IPv6, you should probably consider explicitly disabling IPv6 on your systems until you can take a very concerted approach to enabling IPv6 in a secure manner,' McPherson said."
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World IPv6 Launch Day Underway

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  • slashdot? (Score:5, Insightful)

    by pe1rxq (141710) on Wednesday June 06, 2012 @11:00AM (#40233497) Homepage Journal

    So when is slashdot going to leave the dark ages?

  • by gman003 (1693318) on Wednesday June 06, 2012 @11:13AM (#40233715)

    Well, no more fiddling with port forwarding to make game servers, video chat or anything else work. No more dealing with public/private IPs, or the whole NAT shitpile.

    Oh, and it also makes mandatory certain things like IPsec, and should speed up packet processing by eliminating fragment reassembly (which was also, historically, a common source for security exploits).

    Oh, and while every IP belongs to only one device, there's nothing saying every device should have only one IP. You could easily assign more addresses to a single IPv6 host than the entire IPv4 internet *has*. So anyone trying to track visitors based off IPv6 address will be easily fooled by anyone who tries.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 06, 2012 @11:23AM (#40233839)

    Thanks smartass, but some of us who run large scale networks and use computers for more than porn and Facebook need to access things by IP, need to be able to look at a routing table and have it mean something, need to look at traffic capture and know what we're looking at, and about a million other ways in which I use IPs on a daily basis. Doing a reverse lookup for every goddamn IP I ever see would be completely impractical. I do recognize the need for it, and realize it's going to happen eventually, but for a lot of us, the non humanreadability of IPv6 is a massive massive headache. Hopefully I'll be out of this shit industry before it becomes prevalent.

  • by gstoddart (321705) on Wednesday June 06, 2012 @11:24AM (#40233855) Homepage

    No more dealing with public/private IPs, or the whole NAT shitpile.

    And yet I predict internally companies will still use public/private IPs (10.x.x.x anyone?) and use NAT. My internal private network will continue to use a NAT'ed firewall.

    I predict this will mostly affect stuff outside of the firewall, not inside. Most companies will probably keep their internal network on IPv4. There's no way they're going to want all of their machines with an internet addressable location.

    Oh, and while every IP belongs to only one device, there's nothing saying every device should have only one IP. You could easily assign more addresses to a single IPv6 host than the entire IPv4 internet *has*.

    Which just sounds like more admin work that people won't want to do.

    I think IPv6 does bring some usefulness, but I just don't foresee everybody changing how their internal networks operate. And I can also see a huge amount of consumer type stuff taking years before it has transitioned. IPv4 isn't going to go away overnight.

  • by compro01 (777531) on Wednesday June 06, 2012 @01:18PM (#40235405)

    IPv6 is the final solution to the NAT question.

    Now we just need a cure to the people who have been beating their heads against a wall long enough that they think that NAT is/was a good thing.

  • by DarkOx (621550) on Wednesday June 06, 2012 @01:41PM (#40235677) Journal

    I think we are talking about different things. I am trying to get at marking droids attempting to answer questions like,

    How many unique visits to our website did we get?
    How many people who visitied our flagship site ultrap0rn.com also visited our FaceSpace page?
    How many days a week did Jon Doe surf ultrap0rn.com?
    Did John Zoogle ultraDildos after visiting ultrap0rn.com

    I don't think in practice ipv6 is going to make this significantly easier or harder for them to do, or have much impact on the quality of their data; for the reasons I have mention.

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