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Google Unveils Nexus 7 Tablet, Nexus Q 'Social Streaming Device' 261

Posted by Unknown Lamer
from the introducing-slash-liveblag dept.

Through some stroke of fortune, your friendly editor Timothy Lord is at Google I/O watching the keynote. We'll be updating the story live (below the fold) with his updates as they stream in. Starting things off, he reported a few features of Android Jelly Bean. First, graphics will be triple-buffered for extra smoothness; the graphics demo was reportedly impressive enough that the audience swooned. Text input has been improved with new dictionaries and a predictive keyboard that will learn better over time. Additionally, voice typing will now work offline. English will be initially supported, with Farsi, Thai, and Hindi support to follow. Hit the link below to see further updates, including details on the Nexus 7 tablet and the Nexus Q streaming device.

Update: 06/27 17:16 GMT by S : Camera: Toss photos by just flicking them away — actually, you can now do this with apps on the home screen, too. Pinch for a quick sideshow view; it's much faster than one by one, and makes a quick strip-view to slide back and forth. Undo for photo delete -- nice.

Google Beam: More than a million NFC-enabled devices are out now: In Jellybean, send someone a photo or contact info by tapping phones. Works with big files, too.

Notifications: You can expand and collapse them, they are actionable, and you can get a lot more info directly from notifications than in previous versions. Rather than opening an app from notifications (as from a missed call), you can call right from the notification itself. Similarly, you can read mail (that is, Gmail) right from the notification list. Canned responses to messages are also available directly from notifications. You can see full photos, Foursquare check-ins, etc. Notifications expand as they bubble to the top of the list, but you can also make them expand with a two-finger drag gesture.

Google search: Using Knowledge Graph. The graph allows new "card" answers to Google searches — a bit like "I'm feeling lucky," but with more multimedia right there. Search for 'What movies was Angelina Jolie in,' and you get back a headshot and a filmography.

Voice Search: Quick spoken answers to spoken questions. The demo question was: "Show me pictures of pygmy marmosets." Yep, there are the pictures.

"Google now" (lower case n): "Gets you just the right info at just the right time." It uses things like search, location, and calendar history to figure out what info you might need and when. If you looked for a flight, and it's updated, Google will alert you and show you the new one. It keeps track of your favorite sports teams. (The guy next to me says, "that's scary cool.. and kind of creepy.") Call up public transportation or an upcoming flight and you get details like how long each trip will be and where to transfer. I'm surprised it doesn't tell you which side of the street is shadier to walk on. Google knows now when you're traveling, and tells you, among other things, what time it is back home.

Note for developers: Jelly Bean will start to release to open source in mid-July. Devs can grab the Preview SDK from developer.android.com right now.

Android Engineering director Chis Yerga says Google Play is now up to 600,000 apps and 20 billion downloads Thousands of books and movies, as well as millions of songs. You can store 20,000 tracks for free in your music library. Yerga introduced movie sales, not just rentals. They're also adding TV: buy episodes, or whole seasons — 'perfect for when you're on the bus.' To start, their partners include Disney, NBC, Sony Pics, Paramount, and small ones like Magnolia. There will also be magazines: premium ones (Esquire, Wired) and lots of the pedestrian ones, too.

Brief, but important new features: App encryption (big applause from audience), and smart App updates — only the parts of the APK that update need to be transferred.

What everyone was waiting for: Asus-built Nexus 7, brandished from the stage. It's super thin, light and portable, and has a 1280x800 display. Inside: Tegra 3. Quad-core CPU, 12-core GPU. "That's basically 16 cores, which makes everything, including games, incredibly smooth.' It has Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, NFC, a gyro, an accelerometer, and up to 9 hours of video playback. It weighs 340 grams — like a paperback book. Fits nicely in one hand.

Mag reader gets you form-factor optimized version of magazines, with various swipe-activated interactive features. There were chuckles from audience on showing the cover of 'Shape' magazine. A bikini picture as a demo of interactive "Premium reading experience" on Google play, available for certain magazines. I'm surprised that was the choice. It seems like the kind of thing women developers might not appreciate, or at least that I'd anticipate would have been nixed based on that presumption.

Google has also added a "what's this song" widget, which leads you to (of course) the store, where you can buy the identified song.

Apps on N7 + Jellybean: The Nexus 7 is the first device that ships with Chrome as a standard browser! YouTube app provides high-def video optimized for the N7. Google Maps: you've got the usual features (public transit, etc.), but also, "learn about a place before you get there." It has pannable 3D images inside places (where they have the footage, of course: it's not complete magic). They demonstrated panning inside a bar. BUG: "Make available offline" in a tappable menu means you don't need a data connection. Google Currents, news reader, etc., now has Google Translate built right in, transparently: choose a new language and see your news in Arabic, say, or any supported language, just like that. Games: They showed an amazing game demo (Horn) with lens flare, environment effects, and individually rendered leaves. Another game has zombies and lots and lots of blood (Dead Trigger). Not for kids, but great graphics.

The Nexus 7 price: They will launch "starting at" $199, including a $25 credit in the Google Play store, and several things as teases, including a Transformers movie and the Bourne Dominion book. It will be available in the U.S., Australia, Canada, and the UK to start, with more countries coming.

Mysterious: Project Tungsten. It involves Android and Google Play — the first consumer product Google has ever built from ground up: The "Nexus Q." Q is a small (tiny!) Android computer, which "connects to all the media you have stored in the cloud." It's designed to plug into the best speakers and TV in your home, and always be connected to the cloud. It pulls content directly from Google Play, and is controlled by (but not streaming through) your phone / tablet as a remote. It's a small black orb; looks like a little Death Star. It'll use an NFC connection to your phone: "This is how you get your software," he said, as the phone leaned against it for a moment.

It runs on the same chip as the Galaxy Nexus. And 25-watt amp built right in (!?). It has optical digital audio and micro HDMI outs, too. Dual-band Wi-fi, ethernet, NFC, BT, and a port to encourage 'general hackability' (which got big applause). It's an odd-looking little thing — you won't be stacking anything on top of it. OK, I am drooling: there's a multi-colored LED-lit line around the equator (imagine Luke diving in with his tiny X-wing) which lights in patterns based on music.

It's a 'social connected device': multiple people controlling it from their own tablets in the same space results in their songs from different devices getting spread. Anyone can move songs around the queue, or control the listening experience. "Pretty cool, my friends can now play their music in my living room." Neat tech, but not the very newest possibility in the world. Slightly more cumbersome possibility it replaces: carrying one's whole movie library around. Basically, you can take over the TV connected to the Nexus Q, in order to stream stuff. It will cost $299. They're taking pre-orders now, and the device will start shipping in mid-July.

Google+: Tomorrow is the one-year anniversary of G+. They played a cute video of hangouts, showing live video streaming to group. There's a vibrant community of astronomers, knitters, musicians, etc. 250 million G+ users now, with 50pct daily logins. Users tend to spend more than 12 minutes a day in the stream, up from 9 a few months ago (is that an impressive number?) Google+ is now accessed more from mobile than from desktop. They keep getting the same request from users: "Native tablet version?" That's the big G+ announcement today: native G+ for tablets. Photos, text, video, etc. are stylized slightly differently from each other for easy scanning. Hangout experience is an emphasis, too. Swipe to accept and invite, just like a phone call. Automatic video switching to whoever's talking. Looks slick and sweet. Everything is launching on the iPad, too, "very soon." All the new features also now immediately available for phones. Final note: they're introducing a sort of organization around events. "The substance of a real world event is [now] lost online" -- invites are brittle. Announcement: Google Plus Events, for stuff before, during, after. It includes deep integration with Google Calendar.

Before: Invitation, scheduling, organization. You can choose ready-made, cinematic themes. Eh, that looks sort of weak, but then, people sure bought a lot of trapper keepers in the '80s, and Hallmark is a successful business. During: Streaming, involvement, etc. "Everyone's photos get lost," with typical current mix of devices, systems, etc. But you can enable "party mode," which shares all the photos people are taking, if they've turned it on. Also, a current-photos slideshow. This is also controlled from Notifications — a green icon shows if one has turned on Party mode. OK, this is pretty neat — it beats my long-time idea that weddings should all have stations for dumping pictures from SD cards. After: put all those photos in chronological order: all the pics from all the guests who had party mode on, in one stream. Also, analyze photos, for most engagement or plus-ones, and ones in which you're tagged; can also sort by photographer.

Now Sergey is up on stage for a Google Glass demo...

Sergey is talking with his friend JT — they're live-streaming from about a mile ahead and thousands of feet up. They're in a blimp. They're communicating through a Hangout using Google Glass. He's about to jump with the glasses on . He's wearing a wing suit and has a GoPro camera. They're looking right at Moscone Center. And there they go! They're flying through the air, broadcasting the view live. They're aiming for the Moscone. Since I'm inside a big building, this could all be special effects, and I wouldn't know. And now they've landed on the room. Audience applause is hurting my ears.

And they have bikers up there, to speed them along the roof, also with Glasses. The bikers zoomed along the roof, doing flips, all streamed live. They rappelled down the side of the building to get onto the appropriate floor, then biked right up to the stage. Ludicrous. "Special delivery for Sergey." Now the skydivers and other guys have all reached the stage.

More on Glass: Lots of sensors, networking, location awareness, multiple radios for data communications. The project started 2.5 years ago. They showed a photo of Thad Starner wearing a clunkier version from back then. Now it's more like one side of a pair of fat-framed sunglasses. Lead designer Isabel Olsson (Senior Industrial Designer) talks about it: the display is above the eye; designed to be close to your senses, but not block them. The latest prototype weighs less on the nose than many sunglasses. They showed a few demos: playing tennis, first person service. Jumping into a ball pit. They stressed the importance of scaleable design: put all components to one side, so there can be wide frame compatibility. It looks symmetrically (could be be reversed and put on the other side?), but the demos all seem to show it on the right side (from the user's perspective) of the head.

Aspirations / purposes for Glass:
- Communications, documentation: Sometimes for grand or spectacular purpose (skydivers), but also mundane moments among geo-distant friends (the weather in NY or wherever), a baby growing up, etc.
- Search result medium
- Real-time dashboard (how fast are you going on your bike?)
- Interactive communication -- you're at the market and see something odd, or want to ask your spouse about the product you're supposed to pick up.

They showed a heartwarming demo: it looks like an Apple commerical, which may or may not warm the hearts of the people who made it. Sergey talked a bit about why they're showing these particular features. A) They're excited about it, B) These are things they can show us -- there are other uses, but they're tough to demonstrate, and C) they're a small team, with only a limited ability to test them out in different contexts. Sergey also announced Google Glass Explorer Edition. It's a rough-around-the-edges version for developers. Preorders are available for US-based I/O attendees to start. Cost is $1,500, and they plan to ship it to you sometime next year.
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Google Unveils Nexus 7 Tablet, Nexus Q 'Social Streaming Device'

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  • Uh oh (Score:5, Funny)

    by netwarerip (2221204) on Wednesday June 27, 2012 @12:11PM (#40469283)

    English will be initially supported, with Farsi, Thai, and Hindi support to follow.

    That's all well and good, until someone speaks Farsi when trying to buy one of the devices, in which case all hell will break loose.

    • by jbeaupre (752124)

      I've got a question: Will you catch more hell at an Apple store asking for an iPad in Farsi or a Nexus in English?

  • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 27, 2012 @12:12PM (#40469293)

    Thanks Timothy................ or you can just watch the live stream here: https://developers.google.com/events/io/

  • Music (Score:5, Interesting)

    by darjen (879890) on Wednesday June 27, 2012 @12:18PM (#40469379)

    I wonder if they will finally address Android's audio latency problem this year, so developers can get us some better music production apps.

    http://www.xda-developers.com/android/reduce-audio-latency-on-the-galaxy-nexus-and-nexus-s/ [xda-developers.com]

    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by timothy (36799) Works for Slashdot

      Audio latency is one of the improvements named for Jellybean over ICS at a session later in the day, actually. The presenters said that this is a moving target, though, and that this is one thing where there are device (I took by that "chipset") specific bugs / hangups / fixes needed, so it sounded like more improvements should arrive with updates to Jellybean.

      timothy

  • by alen (225700) on Wednesday June 27, 2012 @12:45PM (#40469713)

    the impression i get is that both are mature with slightly different feature sets and themes. apple lets their developers finish up on the feature set while google likes to tie most features into their backend and let the hardware partners sell the devices.

    very little true cool new features in both updates

    at this point i'm looking to dump AT&T and go pre-paid. I don't even care if i keep a phone for three years instead of 2. even the hardware innovation seems to have flattened out as well. slightly faster CPU, better GPU, better camera. yawn

    • by darjen (879890)

      That is exactly what I have done. I have a droid 2 which I flashed onto a pre-pay service with a regional verizon reseller. I pay $12 a month for all the voice minutes I will ever need and 10mb of data. I mostly just keep 3g disabled and use the smartphone features when I am near wifi.

      My wife does have an ATT iPhone which I activated on a gophone sim. so that is also an option.

      • by alen (225700)

        i'm looking at straight talk myself. $35 a month unlimited everything for an iphone if you pre pay $495 for a year of service. even with the cost of the phone its like $1000 a year saved. i'll eat my ETF too and not worry about it. my wife will probably keep her iphone 4 and not care. i have a 4S and it does what i need it to do.

        might go virgin mobile. they are $30 a month but you have to buy their special iphone. out in the midwest cricket is going to start selling the iphone for $500 and $55 a month

    • by AmiMoJo (196126)

      The problem is we don't have enough support infrastructure to really make use of our phones. NFC is a good example. Japanese people have been able to pay for all sorts of stuff with NFC for years. In many museums you can get more information on an exhibit by touching your phone to the plaque in front of it (replacing QR codes).

      We are only now getting indoor navigation, but again Japan has had it for a long time. Making use of motion sensors for dead reckoning which we only use as a gimmick in games.

  • I don't know, for some reason, that sounds to me like the start of the graphics buffering equivalent of the "blades per razor" war.

    So iOS 6.0 will all of a sudden add quad-buffered graphics for extra-extra smoothness, which means that Google will have to answer with "fuck it, Android Killer chocolate cake uses five buffers!"

    But seriously, does triple-buffering really offer much over traditional double-buffering? I guess it might help if the process doing the animation gets swapped out, so there's an additio

    • Re:Triple buffered? (Score:5, Informative)

      by Thagg (9904) <thadbeier@gmail.com> on Wednesday June 27, 2012 @12:58PM (#40469885) Journal

      There are two cases where triple buffering makes sense:

      1) If it takes a substantial amount of time to clear the image. Recall that in double buffering, you are displaying one image while drawing another. When drawing the image, the first thing that is often done is clearing the image to a background color (and depth). On some devices, this took a substantial amount of the frame-time, and adding more memory was cheaper than making the "clear" faster.

      2) If it takes more than one, but less than two frame times to draw the image, you can have interleaved pipelines. You are viewing framebuffer 0, mostly completed drawing the image in framebuffer 1, and just starting drawing (with a different set of hardware) into framebuffer 2. When you are done drawing, display framebuffer 1, clear framebuffer 0 and begin drawing, and finish drawing framebuffer 2. Note that this kind of triple-buffering decouples update from latency -- you can get very smooth playback at, say, 120 Hz, but the latency is still 1/60th of a second a best.

      Both of these were done when I worked at Silicon Graphics in the early 90's, on machines several orders of magnitude larger than the nexus 7.

      • by AmiMoJo (196126)

        Triple buffering allows you to hide the little stutters you sometimes get when some event happens that delays a single frame slightly. Interrupts are a common example, the CPU gets diverted to handle them and an animation frame is delayed. If you triple buffered and have a frame in hand you can display that (which takes almost no CPU time) while handling the interrupt and the stutter is hidden.

        It is less important on devices with many CPU cores, so this shows Google does care about lower end devices having

    • by 0123456 (636235)

      But seriously, does triple-buffering really offer much over traditional double-buffering?

      Uh, yes.

      With double-buffering and sync to vblank, your frame rate is an integer divisor of the display frame rate. If your screen displays 60fps but your device can only render 59fps, then you'll actually see 30fps and the device will be idling nearly half the time waiting for vblank so it can switch to the other buffer.

      With triple-buffering, if you can render 59fps you can display 59fps. The downside is that it can cause a small increase in latency.

  • by spire3661 (1038968) on Wednesday June 27, 2012 @01:01PM (#40469925) Journal
    Why in the fuck is the Q so expensive? No way that thing will sell against Roku, AppleTV, the consoles (this gen and next) etc.
    • by nschubach (922175)

      Hell, there's a Vizio Co-Star that even supports DLNA streaming unlike any other Google TV Box I'm aware of... and it's $99. It also has On-Live capability, but I couldn't care less about that.

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      For $299 I can buy both an entry level Xbox 360 and an Apple TV. This Q is a disaster.
      • by geekoid (135745)

        Yes, but then you end up with an XBox and an Apple TV. Both have serious problems.

    • Why in the fuck is the Q so expensive? No way that thing will sell against Roku, AppleTV, the consoles (this gen and next) etc.

      Look at it Dennis! It's a perfect sphere!

    • by DRMShill (1157993)

      Because it's designed and manufactured in the USA http://www.engadget.com/2012/06/27/google-q-is-designed-and-manufactured-in-the-u-s-a/ [engadget.com]

  • Every time I see that name I think of the Palm Tungsten... could have picked a different element. I don't think anyone has done anything meaninful with Yttrium lately.

  • by 0123456 (636235) on Wednesday June 27, 2012 @01:11PM (#40470035)

    Like supporting multiple user accounts on a single tablet?

    • by h4rr4r (612664)

      They do. I have two accounts on a nook running CM7.2.

      What issues are you facing exactly?

  • by Hnice (60994) on Wednesday June 27, 2012 @01:27PM (#40470197) Homepage

    "It's designed to plug into the best speakers and TV in your home"

    See, this is the problem right here: why on earth would I keep the best speakers in my home anywhere *near* my tv? Watching TV and listening to music are completely different activities. They don't even use the same chair.

    I don't need to stream *everything* to one place, I need to stream *different* things to *different* places, and I'll gladly pay $250, but not $250 per room if I'm only going to use some of the functionality.

    • See, this is the problem right here: why on earth would I keep the best speakers in my home anywhere *near* my tv? Watching TV and listening to music are completely different activities.

      Right. And the best speakers are for movies, while music is listened to on the car speakers or on headphones while working out and at work. That said, when reading a book while sitting in the most comfortable chair, which is, of course, facing the TV, you might as well use those speakers to listen to music.

      People have different use cases. I'm ok with the fact that you don't hook up your awesome speakers to your TV, but there are quite a few of us who do, and apparently we are the target audience.

      I don't need to stream *everything* to one place, I need to stream *different* things to *different* places, and I'll gladly pay $250, but not $250 per room if I'm only going to use some of the functionality.

      That's a

  • by amcdiarmid (856796) <amcdiarm AT gmail DOT com> on Wednesday June 27, 2012 @01:41PM (#40470361) Journal
    It does not include an external storage device as far as I can tell. Yes I, and some others, do travel to places without cloud access. OK: I want to buy hours of video to keep my kids quiet on a road trip. My cell phone service is lacking where I'm going. 16GB is not going to cut it. I need removable media...
    • It does not include an external storage device as far as I can tell.

      It doesn't include a card reader, if that's what you mean.

      Yes I, and some others, do travel to places without cloud access. OK: I want to buy hours of video to keep my kids quiet on a road trip.

      Portable DVD players are much cheaper than tablets for this task.

      • by h4rr4r (612664)

        Portable DVD players are also far worse for this.
        You have to carry the DVDs, the kids will scratch them. You really can't take them out of the car, they don't offer games, on and on.

        Portable DVD players are cheap and that is the only thing they have going for them.

    • by h4rr4r (612664)

      How is 16GB not going to cut it? Do you drive for more than 8 hours at a time?

      If not, bring laptop, move videos over each night.

    • What I didn't see anywhere is, does it have a micro-USB socket (I assume yes, to connect it to PC); and if so, does that support USB OTG? A lot of Android devices do that these days, and it effectively lets you use any USB stick as external storage - just perfect for those hours of video and such.

      • It has a micro USB socket. Also GPS! See the specs in the Google Play store:

        https://play.google.com/store/devices/details?id=nexus_7_16gb [google.com]

        It doesn't say there whether the USB is OTG or not, but I'll bet that it is. The latest Nexus phone has a micro USB with OTG. But, according to this video, flash drives don't just work out of the box. He speculates that you could root your device and get it to work or that perhaps an update will enable it.

        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8EFl8UEAMcw [youtube.com]

        I'm with you: I want

        • I was going to preorder it until I realized the lack of a slot on the play.google spec list - sorry, for me that IS the deal breaker. And I don't trust that they enable flash drives etc since they are subscribing to apple's "lets gouge them for extra memory" pricing strategy, plus the whole idea of having to jailbreak an "open source" device is just plain stupid.
  • by Sporkinum (655143) on Wednesday June 27, 2012 @01:42PM (#40470379)

    BMX Bandit did his part!
    "And they have bikers up there, to speed them along the roof, also with Glasses. The bikers zoomed along the roof, doing flips, all streamed live. They rappelled down the side of the building to get onto the appropriate floor, then biked right up to the stage. Ludicrous. "Special delivery for Sergey.""

  • by Flipao (903929) on Wednesday June 27, 2012 @01:58PM (#40470589)
    I see huge barriers towards the mass adoption of a device like that, but you have to apreciate them having the balls to pull off that stunt, genuinely glad I got to see it live.

    As far as Android goes it's about time they put the time and effort to make the UI fast and smooth, I'm amazed it's taken them so long to realize how much a laggy UI can hurt the user experience.
    • I see huge barriers towards the mass adoption of a device like that, but you have to apreciate them having the balls to pull off that stunt, genuinely glad I got to see it live.

      I'm genuinely curious - is there any independent video from outside the building? Something that shows the whole thing was indeed shot live, and happened as described (e.g. not someone else doing the skydiving)?

      • by Flipao (903929)

        I see huge barriers towards the mass adoption of a device like that, but you have to apreciate them having the balls to pull off that stunt, genuinely glad I got to see it live.

        I'm genuinely curious - is there any independent video from outside the building? Something that shows the whole thing was indeed shot live, and happened as described (e.g. not someone else doing the skydiving)?

        It didn't really feel like a prerecorded video, Sergey Brin looked genuinely unnerved at times and kept reminding the audience that there was a good chance stuff could go wrong, and the way he fist pumped at the end you could tell he was genuinely relieved everything worked out.

      • There was quite a bit of back and forth between what looked like Glass viewpoint and 3rd part Go camera viewpoint. In fact, you can see that some of them have the Go-type cameras mounted on their helmets. I was actually a little surprised at how much was shot using non-Glass. So parts of it did look a bit staged or faked, even if they weren't. I was just wondering what kind of device they were streaming to from the plane, to the ground where there was no interruption (or were they cutting out to 3rd par
    • by AmiMoJo (196126) <mojo@NOspAm.world3.net> on Wednesday June 27, 2012 @03:32PM (#40471757) Homepage

      I guess you have not tried a high end Android device. The GUI doesn't lag, it is fast and responsive. Occasionally on medium or low end devices there will be a little bit of stutter in the animation due to other tasks needing CPU time and triple buffering will help with that.

      • by Flipao (903929) on Wednesday June 27, 2012 @05:09PM (#40472685)

        I guess you have not tried a high end Android device. The GUI doesn't lag, it is fast and responsive. Occasionally on medium or low end devices there will be a little bit of stutter in the animation due to other tasks needing CPU time and triple buffering will help with that.

        I have tried high end Android devices, I got a transformer tablet last year for example, which I ended up swapping for an iPad as it was not quite there yet. Anything using Gingerbread and below is laggy by default because there is not hardware acceleration for the UI. If you've never used an iPhone or a WebOS device you might not be aware of it, but Android, even on the highest end devices can be laggy as hell, in particular whenever the garbage collector kicks in.

        When they introduced hardware acceleration in Honeycomb for tablets and then ICS for the rest of devices things improved a bit but it was not what you could call "buttery smooth", it was better by miles but still not that great compared to the experience you get in iOS for example, which is quite frankly, flawless. And this isn't me being an Apple apologist, if you go through my previous posts you'll see I'm a massive Android fanboy.

        If you watch the keynote you'll see a demonstration on a Galaxy Nexus. which will show the difference better than I can explain :)

  • I find it amusing that the Nexus Q (you know, the incomplete device that requires hookup to another device to be of any value) costs more than the Nexus 7 (you know, the complete device that doesn't require anything else). Methinks one of these devices is going to do quite well in the market and the other will do less well...

  • If Google is left to the likes of Steve Job wannbe's like Vic Gundotra we'd be sitting for hours listening to complete garbage. I was quite happy to see him getting kicked off stage to make room for Babak Parviz...a real engineer who builds shit.
    • But no, this party invite software is the best thing since sliced bread! You can put pics together to remember the event! And your invitations are animated!!

      Is it just me or do I see Google engineers all standing around at a party with their phones fighting over music playlists (Nexus Q) updating status' and combining pics of the event forgetting they are there to interact with other humans?
  • To me, the big thing that the Nexus has over the Kindle Fire and the Nook Tablet is bluetooth. A tablet on which you can use a BT keyboard to do some serious typing is a device that can replace most of what I do on my netbook -- web surfing, Netflix, email, and light word processing. There are already $200 tablets with BT, but they are things like the Ideapad A1 that don't approach the Nexus in terms of internals and screen quality. This is a big moment as far as I'm concerned. If the thing had a microSD ca

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