Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
GUI Microsoft Windows

Did Metro UX Elements Come From a 2009 Demo? 68

Posted by timothy
from the gesture-grammar dept.
First time accepted submitter oso2k writes "In 2009, as reported by gizmag, Robert Clayton Miller proposed a UI that borrowed from familiar iPhone gestures and translated them to a multi-tasking data-input rich desktop UI. It would seem, however, Microsoft was paying attention. Elements in Miller's design seem to have been lifted for Metro UI, such as dynamic sized widgets (tiles in Metro UI) on the home screen, swipes alternate between open, fullscreened apps, left tap for the app context menu, right tap for the system context menu. And in Miller's video at [5:41], it would seem Microsoft used the same or nearly the same font [4:30]." It's interesting to spot resemblances here, but how many UI ideas don't have more than one inventor?
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

Did Metro UX Elements Come From a 2009 Demo?

Comments Filter:
  • by Anonymous Coward
    Don't you mean the interface formally known as Metro?
    • by Jeremiah Cornelius (137) on Thursday September 27, 2012 @03:01PM (#41481045) Homepage Journal

      Just like a flood of Athenas - flooding from the forehead of Zeus!

      We are awash in the innovations and creativity gushing from Microsoft. One simple antecedent in the case of the Metro interface hardly mars the unbroken record of stunning inventiveness and groundbreaking vision that can be directly attributed to the far-sighted leadership of Ballmer's Microsoft.

      Someday, the humble Zune will be recognized as the beginning of the post-PC era, which Microsoft ushered, leading from behind.

      • Someday, the humble Zune will be recognized as the beginning of the post-PC era...

        You forgot about "Utopia"... the prequel to Metro.

    • Either Slashdot didn't get the memo that the name is now "Windows Store Apps", or else they can't believe any company would pick such a dumb name and are waiting for the "ha ha you almost fell for it - it's really still called Metro" announcement from Redmond.

    • by roc97007 (608802)

      Don't you mean the interface formally known as Metro?

      Right. Which is written as an incomprehensible collection of primary colored squares.

    • by Lumpy (12016)

      It's not called metro, After showing Windows 8 to several people the interface is actually called, "Jeebus, what the hell is that?"

      and no my name is not Jeebus... I wonder how all these users know that it's called "what the hell is that"?

    • by Anonymous Coward

      Don't you mean the interface formally known as Metro?

      *formerly, unless Metro is wearing a tuxedo

  • OMG, time to sue! (Score:2, Insightful)

    by Qwavel (733416)

    They should be sued and shamed - they are supposed to do their design and development in a bubble!

    • by fm6 (162816)

      Yeah, really.

      Whenever I argue that Apple's crusade against Android vendors will give them a smartphone monopoly, somebody says, "No, there's still Windows 8." The good news here is that I no longer have to point out how lame that alternative is.

    • This doesn't even deserve the obligatory defense of "nothing is invented in a bubble".

      There's no real similarity between Windows 8 and the Con10uum interface beyond the fact that both support multi-touch.

      Dynamic sized widgets (tiles in Metro UI) on the home screen.

      Wow widgets you say? On the desktop? You mean like "gadgets" in Windows Vista (shipping 3 years prior) and pretty much every theme since the 90s? The 'tile' innovation isn't that it's a widget it's that it's both a widget and an icon to launch an application. Which also in of itself isn't much of an innovat

  • Zune circa 2006 (Score:5, Informative)

    by Missing.Matter (1845576) on Thursday September 27, 2012 @02:45PM (#41480837)
    Metro design elements date back to at least 2006 with the Zune and evolved in 2008 with the new Xbox 360 UI. The font Microsoft uses for Metro is Segoe and dates back to 2004. Seriously, I know Slashdot is anti MS, but this is just getting ridiculous... first a post about how only 25% of Windows 8 prefer the OS to other versions of Windows, when 74% of those polled say they never even used Windows 8, and now this?
    • This. How about a post on the battery issue in the last OSX update? Or, failing that... news?

    • "Bob" called. He wants his house back

    • by kiriath (2670145)

      Microsoft didn't switch the Xbox UI over to the metro style UI till late last year / early this year. Prior to that it looked less like metro and more like shelves at a video store.

      Honestly the video seems a lot more like the Apple full screen app movement in OS X... sliding back and forth between apps with multitouch gestures.

      Haters will hate, don't let them ruin your day...

    • by Dahamma (304068)

      And Microsoft has already stated/admitted they borrowed major parts of the design language from the King Country Metro system maps in Seattle (hence the name Metro, get it?)

      Hmm, maybe this developer DID THE SAME?

    • by poity (465672)

      That's what I thought. I remember seeing this video back when the squircle Zunes were coming out, and Courier concept video had just been released a few months earlier. People's reaction to it was "yeah, I like it, but Courier is coming out man!" Ha! what a disappointment that was...

    • by mystikkman (1487801) on Thursday September 27, 2012 @03:45PM (#41481509)

      Metro design elements date back to at least 2006 with the Zune and evolved in 2008 with the new Xbox 360 UI. The font Microsoft uses for Metro is Segoe and dates back to 2004. Seriously, I know Slashdot is anti MS, but this is just getting ridiculous... first a post about how only 25% of Windows 8 prefer the OS to other versions of Windows, when 74% of those polled say they never even used Windows 8, and now this?

      If you want to see some Slashdot comedy gold, you should go back and read some of the past anti-Microsoft stories and comments on Slashdot.

      For example take this one http://tech.slashdot.org/story/09/02/16/2259257/Draconian-DRM-Revealed-In-Windows-7 [slashdot.org]

      If these kind of retarded stories were run on some other company, it would be called a FUD campaign secretly sponsored by some evil corp.

    • by ninjacut (1938862)
      Yes, completely agree. Lack of objectivity and strong opinions without even using it in the first place is common on this forum
  • How many? (Score:3, Funny)

    by sconeu (64226) on Thursday September 27, 2012 @02:48PM (#41480887) Homepage Journal

    "... how many UI ideas don't have more than one inventor?"

    Anything "invented" by Apple. Duh! Just ask their legal team!

    • "Alan Kay is on line 2 for you..."
    • by sconeu (64226)

      Offtopic? I quoted TFS for goodness sakes!!!!

    • by tlhIngan (30335)

      "... how many UI ideas don't have more than one inventor?"

      Anything "invented" by Apple. Duh! Just ask their legal team!

      Woz basically invented overlapping windows - he was puzzling over how the Alto did it, and worked out regions (patented Woz) for how to handle when windows overlapped each other. It wasn't until much later that the Alto guys admitted that they didn't allow overlapping windows.

      After his plane crash (but before he had a chance to code it or patent it) the first thing Woz said to Jobs in the h

  • This is actually an interesting concept.
    As one who enjoys tiled window interfaces, I'd like to see more concepts that avoid the stacking window management we've had for so long.
    I do think the model posed is a bit more restrictive than I'd like, though.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    While it looks cool and all lets consider this for a minute. Mouse one point, hand 10 points? Wrong! mouse and keyboard 3+3 and one pointer. But wait the 3 keyboard say shift alt ctrl and 3 mouse can be differentiated! that means 6+6 combos fro touch for total of 12 different interaction modes that too can be combined for 1*2*3*4*5*6 = 720 combos. so ten gui has what 2*(3+3 pinch) plus 2 pointing areas gee.. doesn't sound so great now does it. granted the FIRST pointer of the flour sliders makes sense toug

  • The last time anything in history had a single inventor... well, is unknown. If it ever happened, it happened during prehistoric times.
    • by mcgrew (92797) *

      I take it you've never heard of Eli Whitney [wikipedia.org], Ben Franklin [wikipedia.org], or Charles Babbage? [wikipedia.org]

      • by tragedy (27079)

        Well, let me reply to this with Eli Whitney [wikipedia.org], Ben Franklin [wikipedia.org], and Charles Babbage [wikipedia.org]. Those first two links are to the same articles you linked to, just specific sections. The first one talks about all the previous versions of the cotton gin and then about Eli Whitney's version and competing claims to the invention. The second talks about Benjamin Franklin inventing the lightning rod in the Americas in 1749, then goes on to talk about previous lightning rods from thousands of years before that. The third link isn

      • by narcc (412956)

        All three of your inventors built on existing technology.

        Babbage didn't invent the cam/ratchet/gear/etc., the logic behind the operations either the difference engine or the analytical engine, nor did he conceive the concept of a mechanical computing device.

        Whitney didn't invent the concept of interchangeable parts nor invented all or even a majority of the constituent components of the cotton gin -- even the main unit that separates the cotton from the seeds is alleged to have been inspired by an overly am

        • by mcgrew (92797) *

          A thing is more than the sum of its parts.

          • by narcc (412956)

            True enough, but that misses the point: they built on the work of others.

          • by tragedy (27079)

            Even if a thing is more than the sum of its parts, a lightning rod invented thousands of years ago trumps invention a few hundred years ago.

  • "left tap for the app context menu, right tap for the system context menu"
    So just like Left Click and Right Click then.
    Except with a finger instead of a mouse button...
  • All decent UI ideas were already done by Douglas Englebart.

    You'll have to pardon me, though, I don't have time to elaborate -- speaking His name reminds me that I have to go dust the shrine and do my ritual obeisance again.

    (To meet Poe's law requirements: :-) )

  • The article calls out TUI's ( text based interfaces ) and then claims that the GUI is the ultimate replacement. Based off the introduction the article was written by someone with a mild amount of computer literacy. In many cases a properly designed TUI will destroy a GUI any day of the week all day long. The GUI has it's place but so does the TUI, anyone who disregards either has no right to write technical reviews.
  • This is evolutionary not revolutionary. Aspects that were designed for one platform are moving to another. Big deal. The Dinosaurs are not inheriting the earth.

  • It's obvious Miller went forward in time and stole Microsoft's innovations ..
  • Zune was around in 2006, and Metro is obviously just an evolution of the ideas in Zune. So no, Microsoft didn't steal anything from a 2009 video, and Slashdot editors are idiots for posting this without even doing the most cursory examination of the claim.

  • Nice thought, but a majority of the Metro UI has been around since at least 2007 on Windows Media Center/Vista (including the fonts, a proto-version of the tiles, and many other familiar elements).

  • the demo is exactly like webOS.... except in webOS it looks good, and is useful.

    the demo fells kinda retarted showing the side apps instead of giving the full screen to the app... also, dragging in from the bottom of the screen to enter "window selection mode" instead of dozen fingers gesture...

  • Who copied who arguments....

    Really how boring is this argument?

    People have ideas, ideas that are derivatives of other ideas. When it comes to user interface design these ideas have to be derivative as otherwise people wouldn't find them intuitive, communication is all about expressing things in terms people understand, e.g. alphabets, left to right writing systems, touch, gestures.

    You change the paradigm too much and no one will understand it, this doesn't leave a whole lot of options, repetition in amongs

After an instrument has been assembled, extra components will be found on the bench.

Working...