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Technology

Halliburton's Missing Radioactive Cylinder Found 126

Posted by timothy
from the in-the-junk-drawer-after-all dept.
First time accepted submitter Tator Tot writes "A small radioactive cylinder that went missing from a Halliburton Co. truck last month was found on a Texas road late Thursday, the company said, ending a weeks-long hunt that involved local, state and federal authorities."
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Halliburton's Missing Radioactive Cylinder Found

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  • by crazyjj (2598719) * on Tuesday October 09, 2012 @08:42AM (#41595751)

    What I won't forgive them for is a $2 trillion+ war and tens of thousands of lives lost, all fought so they could get a juicy $7 billion no-bid contract (and about $40 billion in subsequent no-bid logistics contracts through their subsidiary KBR) from their former CEO, who had managed to sleaze his way into the vice-presidency.

    I just wish that losing a little radioactive cylinder were the worst thing they had ever done.

    • Maybe they can embed this cylinder in the hole in Dick Cheney's carapace, where he used to have a heart.

    • by Hatta (162192) on Tuesday October 09, 2012 @08:49AM (#41595829) Journal

      What I won't forgive them for is a $2 trillion+ war and tens of thousands of lives lost

      Not tens, hundreds [wikipedia.org]. Dick Cheney is responsible for the loss of hundreds of thousands of lives.

    • You have that a bit sideways. Cheney was a warhawk and big elephant politician that later became the CEO of Halliburton, and later still became VP. It is misleading to leave out the other bit.

      There might have been some dirty dealings with Halliburton, but the Iraq War was far from a corporate conspiracy.
      • by X0563511 (793323)

        There might have been some dirty dealings with Halliburton, but the Iraq War was far from a corporate conspiracy.

        ... after all, it's not a conspiracy if it's done out in the open.

    • by sycodon (149926)

      You just broke the Tin Foil Hat meter.

      Have you been handling radioactive cylinders?

    • by M. Baranczak (726671) on Tuesday October 09, 2012 @09:47AM (#41596475)

      They were also involved in the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. If we find out that Halliburton is responsible for the eruption of Eyjafjallajokull, for the Smolensk plane crash and for cancelling Farscape, it wouldn't surprise me in the least.

    • You do realize that Clinton and Obama both give Halliburton no-bid contracts right? In fact, Halliburton even lost a bid once, but Clinton gave them the contract anyways. I don't see any indication at all that they were treated any differently under Dubya than anybody else.

    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by argStyopa (232550)

      Only on DailyKOS or slashdot would this be seen as "Insightful" and not flamebait/troll.

      Apparently Dick Cheney has the Emperor-like ability to control the minds of his political opponents in different places in space AND TIME (since you'll notice many of these comments predate his arrival as the Liberal's favorite Shylock in 2000)?:

      "One way or the other, we are determined to deny Iraq the capacity to develop weapons of mass destruction and the missiles to deliver them. That is our bottom line." President Cl

      • Oh! And one more thing. Do you know who has WMDs? The US of A. Also, it's the only country who used WMDs against another. Twice. On civilians. Good night.
  • this moment of snark brought to you by - HEX
  • Weeks long hunt? (Score:4, Insightful)

    by slackware 3.6 (2524328) on Tuesday October 09, 2012 @08:47AM (#41595809)
    And how much are they going to be billed for the cost of law enforcment to find their cylinder. Or to they just get a freebie?
  • probably a fake (Score:5, Interesting)

    by slashmydots (2189826) on Tuesday October 09, 2012 @08:49AM (#41595833)
    Considering how bad it makes them look, I think they made another one, planted it on the road, and pretended to find it. Usually things like radioactive cylinders are secured enough to not go flying off a truck.
    • by Waccoon (1186667)

      Usually things like radioactive cylinders are secured enough to not go flying off a truck.

      Yeah, and nuclear reactors are maintained well enough so they don't have football-sized holes in their reactor vessels.

      Not that I have zero faith in modern management, but I won't rule out any level of human stupidity these days.

  • Doh (Score:5, Funny)

    by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday October 09, 2012 @08:59AM (#41595905)

    Now every time I see the opening credits to the Simpsons when Homer's driving home and finds a misplaced glowing radioactive rod stuck to his back and throws it out the window I'll think of Halliburton.

  • What's that in half-lives?

    Related: What's the half-life of your job when you lose nuclear material like this?

  • Nice place to not live anymore.

  • by puddingebola (2036796) on Tuesday October 09, 2012 @09:03AM (#41595955) Journal
    I suspect Jerry Jones. He probably heard he could use it to power the new big screen TV in Cowboys stadium. Radiation exposure explains the offense's play in last Monday night's game with the Bears.
  • by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday October 09, 2012 @09:07AM (#41596005)

    [Cave Johnson voice]
    The good news is, we found the radioactive cylinder, and you're not being fired for losing it. The bad news is, you're moving to Reeves County, Texas, and your new job is exterminating giant, glowing insects.
    [/Cave Johnson voice]

  • you get the followup story, too.
  • by Anonymous Coward

    I was expecting it to show up in satellite footage captured over Iran ... you know, in case the UN needs proof.

  • And I bet they're not gonna pay a penny of the extra costs to the local, state, and federal law enforcement agencies. We're gonna pay for it, via taxes.

  • ... along the road from the plant to Springfield.

  • by webdog314 (960286) on Tuesday October 09, 2012 @12:29PM (#41598315)

    Maybe I'm not quite understanding the situation, but couldn't you just put a reasonably sensitive geiger counter on a truck and slowly drive it down the same road until you get a spike?

    • by Gordonjcp (186804)

      That's how I would have done it, too. You'd presumably have GPS tracks from the trucks, and various ANPR/CCTV sightings along the route. Some sort of camera and Geiger counter on a small van with the truck's route programmed into a GPS would take you to it. Well, assuming it hasn't been found and moved.

      In other news, there isn't a fallen-off exhaust pipe or silencer to be found in a big swathe across America's roads ;-)

    • by downhole (831621)

      For all of the hoopla over it, these types of sources are actually pretty weak. I don't know the activity level of this particular one, but most likely you'd have to put it in your pocket and walk around with it for a day or three for any measurable damage to happen. I haven't read that much about this actual situation, but they probably tried that before they even bothered calling in the National Guard. It most likely bounced far enough from the road that it wasn't detectable this way. No matter how sensit

  • their regular duties. You know, pouring defective cement casings on offshore oil wells, building US military bases on other people's lands, and chopping up the remains of the Iraqi oil industry.

  • so, how do we know that they didn't just drop another one where it would be found so they could end the search?
    • Local newspaper is reporting it was found on a road the Haliburton crew did not travel. Mywesttexas.com

The most exciting phrase to hear in science, the one that heralds new discoveries, is not "Eureka!" (I found it!) but "That's funny ..." -- Isaac Asimov

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