Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Transportation

Electric Velomobiles: Urban Transportation For the Future, Available Now 201

Posted by timothy
from the let's-go-for-a-spin dept.
An anonymous reader writes with this excerpt from Low-Tech Magazine: "Both the velomobile and the electric bicycle increase the limited range of the cyclist — the former optimises aerodynamics and ergonomics, while the latter assists muscle power with an electric motor fuelled by a battery. The electric velomobile combines both approaches, and so maximises the range of the cyclist — so much so that it is able to replace most, if not all, automobile trips. A quarter of the existent wind turbines in the U.S. would suffice to power as many electric velomobiles as there are Americans." One thing I wish was included in the article — worth reading for the photos alone! — is a chart with prices and worldwide availability for more of the vehicles mentioned. They do mention, though, that the eWAW ("the Ferrari of the velomobiles") costs 7790 Euro.
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

Electric Velomobiles: Urban Transportation For the Future, Available Now

Comments Filter:
  • Re:25 miles per hour (Score:5, Informative)

    by hack slash (1064002) on Sunday November 04, 2012 @12:43AM (#41870199)
    Legal reasons are a likely for the explanation of the motor cutting out at a certain speed. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electric_bicycle_laws [wikipedia.org] for a comprehensive breakdown of legalities regarding electric bikes speed/weight/motor power in US states and around the world.
  • by jotaeleemeese (303437) on Sunday November 04, 2012 @01:13AM (#41870311) Homepage Journal

    I take the bus regularly in London, most times in the upper floor of a double decker.

    From there one can follow the progress of individual cyclists, and is undeniable that most of them move pretty much at the same speed as the motorized vehicles, even some runners can keep up with traffic speed for a while.

    Most of the world is or will be urban, so fast vehicles will be completely redundant to the actual needs of urban dwellers.

  • by tftp (111690) on Sunday November 04, 2012 @01:17AM (#41870327) Homepage

    This vehicle combines the worst parts of bicycle experience with the worst parts of car experience. It only can be used to deliver your body from point A to point B - even though many, if not most, trips require carrying cargo (even as little as a laptop bag; but often groceries are also required.) This works only on absolutely flat land, and in good weather. In case of an accident your body will be neatly squashed by wheels of larger vehicles, making it a death trap. There are no creature comforts, such as a/c or radio or headlights, which makes it dangerous to drive at high temperatures (half of the year in half of the USA) or at night (other half of the year in another half of the USA.) Usability-wise, it's another Ginger (Segway,) only even less practical. Only well trained young men can ride the thing. Children cannot use it; older persons cannot use it; women, being statistically weaker, cannot use them. Even tired people, after a full day of honest work, may not need another exercise on their way home. Riders will arrive to their destinations soaked in sweat, stinking, dusty; their arms and legs will be shaking from exertion, and it will take some time for them to cool down and be ready to work at the office. All in all, this is yet another fringe vehicle for the same, well known fringe group that insists that public roads are their personal gym.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Sunday November 04, 2012 @01:26AM (#41870369)

    The velomobiles look a lot like the Sinclair C5 electric vehicle, which put Sir Clive Sinclair's company out of business. People hated the C5 because it was impractical, expensive, dangerous, and because it looked silly.

    They appear to be considerably more dangerous than a normal bicycle - they surely lack maneuverability, handy for avoiding accidents, and they operate much nearer the ground, making them invisible to vehicles with a high ride height.

  • Re:one problem (Score:5, Informative)

    by Rosco P. Coltrane (209368) on Sunday November 04, 2012 @01:56AM (#41870469)

    I have a velomobile. I ride between 6 and 10 thousand miles a year - which is actually pretty easy, given that the velomobile is fast and protects you from the weather so you ride year round without any trouble.

    With the gasoline I save, the depreciation of the car I don't use when I ride the velo, parking tickets I don't have to pay... the velo paid for itself in 3 years. After that it's all free miles.

  • by Rosco P. Coltrane (209368) on Sunday November 04, 2012 @02:21AM (#41870565)

    Your post show how misinformed you are:

    This vehicle combines the worst parts of bicycle experience with the worst parts of car experience. It only can be used to deliver your body from point A to point B - even though many, if not most, trips require carrying cargo (even as little as a laptop bag; but often groceries are also required.)

    See this video. [youtube.com]

    This works only on absolutely flat land, and in good weather.

    See this video. [youtube.com]

    In case of an accident your body will be neatly squashed by wheels of larger vehicles, making it a death trap.

    See this video [youtube.com] and this video. [youtube.com]

    See this video [youtube.com] and this video [youtube.com]

    Only well trained young men can ride the thing

    See this video [photobucket.com]

    As for the rest of your comments, you'll find plenty of videos and sites to prove you wrong. I can't be bothered to find them for you just right now.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Sunday November 04, 2012 @03:12AM (#41870725)

    For what it's worth, this is the definition of a bicycle under Australian road rules [ntc.gov.au]:

    bicycle means a vehicle with 2 or more wheels that is built to be
    propelled by human power through a belt, chain or gears (whether or
    not it has an auxiliary motor), and:
      (a) includes a pedicab, penny-farthing and tricycle; but
      (b) does not include a wheelchair, wheeled recreational device,
    wheeled toy, or any vehicle with an auxiliary motor capable
    of generating a power output over 200 watts (whether or not
    the motor is operating).

    The 200W limit is what kills most power assisted bikes (not that it stops many people, they'll only get in trouble if they're being dickheads or end up in an accident).

Brain fried -- Core dumped

Working...