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100km/h Sailboat Sets Speed Record 103

Posted by Soulskill
from the you-know-we-invented-motors-right? dept.
fustakrakich writes with news that a boat powered only by its sails has reached speeds of 100km/h for the first time. The team also claims to have reached 109km/h over a 500m course. The craft took the speed record back from kite surfers, who have somewhat smaller sails but a massive weight advantage over boats. "Sailrocket 2 set the record last week, and the speed 54.08 knots (100.1 km/h) the craft achieved has been recognized by the World Sailing Speed Record Council as the new mark in Class B for vessels traversing a 500 meter course. The speed is higher than any other vessel recorded in the Council’s lists and is the only recorded speed over 100 km/h." Gizmag has a more detailed article about Sailrocket 2's exploits, and says in an update that the craft achieved speeds of 121km/h today (65.37 knots).

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100km/h Sailboat Sets Speed Record

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  • Let's have a look at the Council's list that is linked in TFA and TFS. 100 km/hr is 53.996 knots. What do we see?

    2010 Kite-board Alexandre Caizergues FRA Luderitz, NAM 54.10 kts
    2010 Kite-board Sebastien Cattalan FRA Luderitz, NAM 55.49 kts
    2010 Kite-board Rob Douglas USA Luderitz, NAM 55.65 kts

    3 kiters in 2010 certified as going faster than 100 km/hr. Sailrocket's achievement of a new outright record is awesome, it doesn't need to be embellished (or damaged)

    • by sumdumass (711423)

      I think the difference is that with a Kite-board, the sail isn't attached to the structure but rather flown as a kite and tethered to the floating device usually resembling a surfboard or a wake board. This uses an actual sail attached to an actual boat making it slightly different.

      This is actually a record for the type of boat, one with the sails physically attached and pushing instead of pulling the vessel.

    • by Anonymous Coward

      RC sailplanes regularly hits speed over 300 knots (400 MPH). That's pure wind power.

      I'm sure some ice-rail has hit speeds well over 100 MPH.

  • Dangerous (Score:5, Interesting)

    by interiot (50685) on Saturday November 24, 2012 @04:35PM (#42083151) Homepage

    Interesting fact — There's an 85% fatality rate [wikipedia.org] for the speed record for any boat. This sport is extremely dangerous.

    The sailing speed record is 80% slower than the overall boat record, so the sailing record is a little safer. Nonetheless, one of the SailRocket crashes led to the pilot having a broken helmet [yachtpals.com].

    • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

      by Anonymous Coward

      After a crash like that he builds a faster boat and gets in it? I'm surprised the boat is big enough to fit his balls!

      Interesting fact: The boat is travelling almost 3 times faster than the wind. This is due to the apparent wind, i.e. the wind generated by the boat's own motion through the air.

    • by Kjella (173770)

      I'm not really surprised, since unlike a lot of engine/rocket powered vehicles the driving force is external, not internal. I've been on a racing boat in gale force winds - not during a race mind you - and the forces pounding us were massive. I was more concerned then than doing 140 mph on the Autobahn in Germany, even though the few that were there from the racing crew said that during a race they'd have set even more sails and gone even faster. It's fine as long as you stay on the boat somehow but if you

    • That wasn't a crash helmet, it was an aerodynamic faring attached to his head. It stuck out like two feet to the rear of his head. Not the same as a crash helmet.
  • by rossdee (243626)

    How fast could it go in a category 5 hurricane?

    • by ewanm89 (1052822)

      0MPH? It'll have a broken mast ripped sails and capsized. Not to mention one couldn't control it, probably even reefing the sails to their most extreme reefing point wouldn't help. The maximum speed of a sailboat doesn't just increase with windspeed, it's a bit more complicated than that.

  • I wonder whether it would be possible to design an autonomous, computer-stabilized wind/kitesurfer. Free of human limitations this could go faster still.

  • by angel'o'sphere (80593) on Saturday November 24, 2012 @06:34PM (#42083771) Homepage Journal

    The speed record has "Hydropetre". Which has vrious records.
    The question perhaps is if Hydropetre managed to hold the speed over 500m, but I would guessed so.
    The point about Hydropetre is, it is a real sailing yacht where you can live on during your journeys. (Albeit, as a hydrofoil sailer, it is a bit gewÃhnungsbedürftig)

    • by boule75 (649166)
      Well, it is Hydroptère, and have a look at images [youtube.com] from 2009 when they broke the 100 km/h barrier over 500m. Here [hydroptere.com] is the "records" page of the official site. They plan to dash through the Pacific Ocean with that boat...
  • I just love all you "back seat" drivers out there critical of this feat! This guy just went 100 km/hr in a sail boat!!! Nuff said!
  • I know you think using only knots and km/h is cool and all, but given much of the english speaking world primarily still deals with mph for knowing speed you do everyone a disservice leaving it out.

    The speed was 62.2 mph, which is damn impressive for a wind powered boat.

    • by bmo (77928) on Saturday November 24, 2012 @09:19PM (#42084449)

      >I know you think using only knot

      There's a reason why nautical miles are used. They are roughly one minute of arc along a meridian. They are what you use when you are out on the ocean, because that's the only thing that truly makes sense when you've got a sphere divided up into degrees, minutes, and seconds.

      Also

      American here, I know the english system (both imperial and not) and metric system of measurments and navigational measurements (which are neither "english" nor "metric" but are SI anyway). Instead of being mad at people using terms you're not familiar with, how about you go look them up and educate yourself?

      By the way, they broke 65 knots average speed. You do the math to figure out how fast that is.

      --
      BMO

      • by AmiMoJo (196126) *

        They are roughly one minute of arc along a meridian.

        One minute arc of latitude, but the length of an minute arc of longitude varies depending on latitude.

        They are what you use when you are out on the ocean, because that's the only thing that truly makes sense when you've got a sphere divided up into degrees, minutes, and seconds.

        Any sensible map will be divided up using a square grid rather than variable minute arcs.

      • There's a reason why nautical miles are used.

        Yes there are.

        Also to set up the rest of the post, the remainder of your sentence should have been "in the article summary" since that is what we are talking about.

        They are roughly one minute of arc along a meridian.

        That is not why knots are used in the article summary.

        They are what you use when you are out on the ocean

        Yes they are. How many Slashdot readers on out on the ocean as they are reading this? I would wager the answer is so close to none as to make no

        • by bmo (77928)

          >But they have no relevance to any of the readers.

          Bullshit.

          Not everyone is in a land-locked state, and when referring to marine events such as this, it only makes sense to use marine terms.

          More than 50 percent live within an hour's drive of the coast.

          http://oceanservice.noaa.gov/facts/population.html [noaa.gov]

          --
          BMO

          • Bullshit.

            Double bullshit. I win.

            Not everyone is in a land-locked state

            BZZZZT! it's about EXPERIENCE.

            More than 50 percent live within an hour's drive of the coast.

            So what? I live within an hours drive of many large lakes and the mountains. I've not been on a boat or skiing in years.

            But the real point is that very few people will have the EXPERIENCE to understand what 50 knots is or feels like. Is that like a train? A race car? Coasting down a hill on a bike? Most people KNOW from driving what a numb

            • by bmo (77928)

              >Just go up to any random person and tell them to guess how fast is 60 knots is compared to a car.

              Around here, the answer would be "slightly faster" and they would be correct.

              Stop being a twat.

              --
              BMO

            • by dywolf (2673597)

              http://lmgtfy.com/?q=50+knots+mph [lmgtfy.com]

              Bam. Couple seconds to type it into google, half a second for a reply. Done.

      • by dywolf (2673597)

        thank you for being reasonable. I often say in these kinds of threads that in todays world of instant calculation there's no reason to get upset of units being used when all it takes is 0.05 seconds of Google calculation to convert from one unit to another.

    • I know you think using only knots and km/h is cool and all, but given much of the english speaking world primarily still deals with mph

      Most meaning UK, US and Canada? There is an entire world beyond your back-yard fence, a world that doesn't give a crap about the random numbers used to multiply ass-pulled units [wikipedia.org].

  • Hey, this is in my hometown, and the Yacht Club is one of my favorite hangouts. When they broke the record, there was quite a bit of cheering and booze going around. And the next day it was even more windy - go figure. Seriously, though... this is seriously fast. The fastest I have ever been on water was in a fast rescue boat, and that could only manage 36kt, while this baby was touching 60kt... they are currently doing some checking and final preparation, and then will try again to break the 60kt barrier
  • That is not sail boat.

In 1869 the waffle iron was invented for people who had wrinkled waffles.

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