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The Military Technology

DARPA Wants Distributed Network of Deep Sea Storage Units 81

Posted by Unknown Lamer
from the release-the-non-lethal-military-assets dept.
Zothecula writes "DARPA has seen the future of naval warfare and it's falling upward. As part of an effort to reduce the logistics of sending equipment into trouble areas, the agency's Upward Falling Payloads project is aimed at developing storage capsules capable of remaining on the deep seabed for years. These would contain non-lethal military assets that could be deployed on the spot years in advance and rise to the surface as needed." Possible side benefit: they need to research communications systems reliable enough to command the deep sea capsules when needed.
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DARPA Wants Distributed Network of Deep Sea Storage Units

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  • Concrete becomes stronger under compression. There was some experimentation among the smaller nations of the world a few years ago to build inexpensive submarines using concrete hulls since concrete has such good compressive strength. There is no reason why concrete wouldn't make an excellent storage container.
  • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday January 16, 2013 @11:40AM (#42604917)

    DARPA wants to invent robots that are designed to "rise up"? Sounds like a pretty dangerous precedent to me.

  • by Virtucon (127420) on Wednesday January 16, 2013 @11:42AM (#42604949)

    That Ricky and Bubba will be bidding on the storage units if the government doesn't pay the rent?

  • Since this Slashdot the title should really be storage containers as the obvious assumption is a storage unit stores data!
    • you should write underwater RAID

      because an underwater raid of a different sort is also an issue with this concept

      • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

        by Anonymous Coward

        well, instead of storing all your data in the cloud, you can now store it in the drink too.

    • by icebike (68054) on Wednesday January 16, 2013 @02:20PM (#42607199)

      Since this Slashdot the title should really be storage containers as the obvious assumption is a storage unit stores data!

      RAID: Reconnaissance Assets Invisibly Drowned?

      This is old news, the story was posted on slashdot last week [slashdot.org]. Same story, same request, same misinterpretation of what is actually sought.

      The request is for pre-positioned military assets (non lethal) for surveillance and intelligence which remain inert on the sea floor until needed, and then become buoyant, rise to the surface and release aerial surveillance equipment, (short life drones or balloons), or merely float and gather signal intelligence.
      These could be used for search and rescue as well as intelligence gathering in trouble spots.

      This avoids having to find some way to fly a plane or a manned drone to some remote location in a hurry. Since its not a munition, its not considered an aggressive act to seed the ocean floor (4000 feet down, in international waters) with something that you can later instruct to become active.

      It is thought that being down 4000 feet would be enough protection to make them unlikely to be messed with. (Wishful thinking if you ask me, once you abandon anything on the ocean bottom without support of international treaty, its pretty much fair game for salvage or state sponsored retrieval via ROVs.).

  • by Anonymous Coward

    All this effort just so a dysfunctional, rag-tag group of strangers can find the armament they need to outfit the rebel military and take back Tampa in 2027.

  • dup (Score:5, Insightful)

    by stoolpigeon (454276) * <bittercode@gmail> on Wednesday January 16, 2013 @11:44AM (#42604983) Homepage Journal

    if you need karma go back to when this ran 4 days ago and grab some high rated comments.

    tagging a story dup in the 'mysterious future' should flag it for review so this doesn't happen.

  • by Press2ToContinue (2424598) * on Wednesday January 16, 2013 @11:44AM (#42604985)

    When the current cryotograghic algorithms which secure these cracker-jack prizes become easily crackable by script-kiddies, and with future long-range private drones weilding live HD cams, I see a new form of geocaching game on the horizon.

    I'll look forward to watching the reruns on Youtube.

    Thanks US Military!

    • Yup, this will be so cool. Imagine your own personal armoury. Finally a modern version of the battleships game.
    • by mjr167 (2477430)
      Don't we do this with stuff from WWII out in the desert already?
  • by Anonymous Coward

    I recommend they look into Slashdot's Upward Falling Stories [slashdot.org], which tend to drop off the front page and then float back up again as a repost.

  • If this isn't proof that time traveling aliens are running the government, I don't know what is.

  • by Press2ToContinue (2424598) * on Wednesday January 16, 2013 @11:57AM (#42605161)

    Ocean explorers recover a remarkably well-preserved, ancient artifact from the deep mud of the ocean floor.

    "What the hell is it??"

    "I don't really know. It must be newer than the geological data indicate. We have no record of any prior advanced civilizations."

  • "deployed years later" .. isn't there a risk that the equipment would be obsolete? Field equipment is changing rather rapidly in this day and age, especially electronics.

    • by vlm (69642)

      "deployed years later" .. isn't there a risk that the equipment would be obsolete? Field equipment is changing rather rapidly in this day and age, especially electronics.

      Clearly not been in .mil. Some high tech stuff, lots thats not...

      Sterile bags of saline solution, IV stuff, band aids, field dressings, pioneer tools, food...

      • by roc97007 (608802)

        "deployed years later" .. isn't there a risk that the equipment would be obsolete? Field equipment is changing rather rapidly in this day and age, especially electronics.

        Clearly not been in .mil. Some high tech stuff, lots thats not...

        Sterile bags of saline solution, IV stuff, band aids, field dressings, pioneer tools, food...

        Oh, but I have. Military contractor, seven years, electronics. And yes, a lot of the stuff still in use is of elderly pedegree, but just recently there's been some decent advances (probably spurred by new types of warfare, necessity being the mother etc.) and more on the way. More than any other time since *I* was involved, existing gear can be mooted by new countermeasures. So as someone else said, the value appears to be staples like food, clothing. *maybe* small arms ammunition, although there's bee

    • We are resting on a pretty solid plateau right now. Solar power(PV) is reaching an apex, we have cheap, powerful and plentiful SoCs for plenty of grunt work. What we lack mostly is the legion of programmers we are going to need to tie all this stuff together.
    • by tlhIngan (30335)

      "deployed years later" .. isn't there a risk that the equipment would be obsolete? Field equipment is changing rather rapidly in this day and age, especially electronics.

      Depends. It could be stuff like supplies (fuel/oil/grease, food, ammo) which while having a shelf life, can be stored for a bit and unlikely to be obsoleted quickly. This is the most likely case as having pre-positioned supplies at the ready gives you a strong advantage out of the gate by being able to resupply without having a nearby resup

  • Really? (Score:4, Funny)

    by NEDHead (1651195) on Wednesday January 16, 2013 @12:15PM (#42605447)

    Just how long can a Marine Division wait on the ocean floor and still be effective?

  • Shaggy Man's body is indestrucible.

  • If we can't find any, we'll create some...

  • by Anonymous Coward

    I had an idea like that a while back, as a way to stash personal stuff out of sight for long periods. Seal (e.g. weld) the stuff in a box with a microphone, piezo beeper, low powered microprocessor, and lithium battery pack inside. There are lithium chloride batteries (e.g. Tadiran) that can supply small amounts of current for decades, and an 8-bit CMOS processor uses just a few microamps at low speed (think of digital watches). The box would just sit quietly on the bottom listening for a certain 128-bit

  • by dcw3 (649211)

    Possible side benefit: they need to research communications systems reliable enough to command the deep sea capsules when needed.

    The navy has had this ability for quite some time. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Extremely_low_frequency [wikipedia.org]

  • isn't this how the aliens "invaded" in the latest 'War of the Worlds' movie with Tom Cruise?
  • Dear America, Please don't mine the entire ocean with giant non-robotic sea mines, just because you can, signed, the rest of the world. Also, didn't we have this conversation last week?
  • by mbstone (457308) on Wednesday January 16, 2013 @01:44PM (#42606737)

    Like buying presents for children, there's really no way of knowing whether the DoD will in the future be able to make use of whatever they stash away, or whether it will still be edible, nonobsolete, or even free of rust and bilgewater.

    So along with the Great Northern beans and networking nodes with 10,000-day vulnerabilities, let's add some historical memorabilia. Copies of current Navy regulations and 12 year old scotch for example.

    Another possibility is that DARPA could plant stuff designed to be found by the enemy. Trick black soap. Bogus ciphers that will cause the enemy to spend years or decades fruitlessly attempting to decode. Bogus mine-defusing instructions that will make them go boom.

  • As a long-time RTS fan, I love this idea. Ok, grudgingly, no guns in it.

    Still, "if you find yourself in a fair fight, you haven't done your homework." Given history, I'm fine with the US spending as much as the next 20 nations combined. It's freaking cheap compared to a real war.

  • Police officer: Kareem, where did you get that RPG and the bazooka?

    Fisherman: Sir, I found them just floating in the water, sir

    Police officer: Kareem, you know me. Don't make me break your jaw bone. Tell me did you get them from the ashram-e-talbi group?

    Fisherman: Sir, no sir. I was just fishing sir. My net got trapped in something on the seabed sir. I jumped down and dived in, and saw it was caught in some kind of handle sir. I twisted the handle, released the net, came up for air, I was floating in the

  • In other words:

    "We are famously over-stocked on items that we are not actually using because of huge budget allocations. We don't want to lose those budget numbers and the goverment is saying we need to buy their defense contractor friends' goods. The plan is to just purchase a billion dollars of equipment and just sink it never to be seen again. Everybody wins, except maybe the taxpayers."

    --Tirian

  • what "assets" won't be obsolete in 10 years maybe, and definitely 20? Gloves? Shoes? Certainly not weapons or electronics. Sounds like the military needs a reason to bury something on a regular basis, but it's not equipment.

  • Haven't fully woken up yet, waiting for caffeine to kick in. Read the title as "Deep Sea Storage Urchins" ...

  • When can we put Bruce Willis into storage?

How many Unix hacks does it take to change a light bulb? Let's see, can you use a shell script for that or does it need a C program?

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