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Tesla, Ford, Amazon Hint At Cloudy Future For Cars 231

Posted by samzenpus
from the where-the-processor-meets-the-road dept.
Nerval's Lobster writes "The automobile, once the most analog of technologies, is rapidly becoming a smartphone on wheels: Amazon announced Feb. 13 that Ford SYNC Applink-equipped vehicles will include the Amazon Cloud Player, allowing drivers to access their music libraries via voice command or dashboard controls. Ford isn't the only automotive company seeking to integrate cloud computing into the driving experience. Tesla Motors' Model S electric sedan boasts a 17-inch capacitive touch-screen in place of the usual dashboard buttons and dials. And who could forget Google's self-driving car? This isn't a future everybody wants—there are more than a few wannabe Steve McQueens who won't feel complete unless they can stomp on a pedal connected to an internal-combustion engine, flick a physical dashboard knob to the radio station of their choice, and peel out their driveway in a cloud of burning rubber. But as the latest technology migrates into automobiles, it could well be the future we're going to receive."
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Tesla, Ford, Amazon Hint At Cloudy Future For Cars

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  • by bunbuntheminilop (935594) on Thursday February 14, 2013 @01:32AM (#42892635)

    Oh! I see what you did there!

  • by Osgeld (1900440) on Thursday February 14, 2013 @01:36AM (#42892649)

    it doesnt move depending on what mode my screen is in or require me to look to change the volume

    • by afidel (530433) on Thursday February 14, 2013 @01:44AM (#42892695)

      I agree with this 100% and it's one of my biggest pet peeves about modern head units, onscreen displays are really unsafe. The one thing I want more than hardware buttons though is a single hardware button that tells my smartphone over Bluetooth to listen for a voice command, I don't want a head unit with built in apps that will be dead long before the 10-12 year typical car life, I want a standard way to use my more or less disposable smartphone.

      On a related topic, when do we get voice control of Amazon cloud player for Android/iOS?

      • by mjwx (966435) on Thursday February 14, 2013 @02:21AM (#42892831)

        I agree with this 100% and it's one of my biggest pet peeves about modern head units, onscreen displays are really unsafe. The one thing I want more than hardware buttons though is a single hardware button that tells my smartphone over Bluetooth to listen for a voice command, I don't want a head unit with built in apps that will be dead long before the 10-12 year typical car life, I want a standard way to use my more or less disposable smartphone.

        This, this, a thousand times this.

        Touch screen units require me to take my eyes off the road.

        Also, I drive a car built in 2006, the stock head unit doesn't even have a USB port, I have to use this archaic device called a "Compact Disc" to transport music. I'm half surprised I'm I dont need a stone tablet.

        How the hell do Ford/BWM/GM et al know what technology I'll want in a car 10 years from now. With my 2006 Integra, I can replace the head unit with minimal fuss (well as soon as I find a wiring loom for it) but BWM are integrating the head unit into the car. With BMW you dont have to worry so much as they'll keep making updates (and installing them onto old Bimmers for a not so modest fee) but the likes of Ford and Hyundai? Hyundai dont give a shit about the i30's they sold last week, let alone an Elantra they sold 5 years ago.

        • My '12 Challenger R/T has a USB port, in the center cubby, not in the dash though... It's also a 1.5 DIN unit, though not that common, is a pretty standard size, though double-din or single-din would have been preferred. Never used a CD.. though I did get the version I wanted as it had the best engine available without requiring leather seats (I'm in AZ), or sat-nav...

          Would love to see the stereo have very basic functionality, but when paired with a smart phone simply be a screen + voice command interf
          • My '12 Challenger R/T has a USB port...

            Yes, but what connection are you going to want in 2018? I would be almost willing to bet (I have a rule, if I place a bet with you, you may as well just give me the money, I already know the outcome--not think, know) it will not be a USB port.

        • Well, given the tens of thousands in premium you pay to purchase a BMW or Acura plus the additional maintenance expenses, the least they can do is keep updating them.
      • by drinkypoo (153816)

        The one thing I want more than hardware buttons though is a single hardware button that tells my smartphone over Bluetooth to listen for a voice command, I don't want a head unit with built in apps that will be dead long before the 10-12 year typical car life, I want a standard way to use my more or less disposable smartphone.

        You have it already. It is called bluetooth. If your head unit doesn't support it, upgrade to one which does. Get a decent phone (with proper bluetooth -- that's most of them now, as contrasted to the pre-touch days of smartphones) and a decent head unit and you can reasonably expect to accomplish pairing. My el cheapo JVC lets me pair for audio output. At that point I can do everything with my phone's voice control via my headset.

        Now, what we really need that we don't already have is a standard interface t

    • by kombipom (1274672) on Thursday February 14, 2013 @02:56AM (#42892971) Journal

      Those kinds of controls have all moved to on-the-steering-wheel buttons. And presumably most of the controls are going to be voice activated soon, via all this fancy computing you seem so opposed to (on /. FFS).

      • by gl4ss (559668)

        you either have the physical buttons or you don't. if you move everything to steering wheel then you still have them, they're just on steering wheel.

        but the 17" touchscreen is useful only when you're parked or if it's being used by the passenger.

    • by siddesu (698447)
      Don't worry, they'll have the logs to prove it was your fault.
    • by wonkey_monkey (2592601) on Thursday February 14, 2013 @04:04AM (#42893273) Homepage

      Yea, I like a physical knob

      That's what she said.

      • by tehcyder (746570)
        I did wonder about all the knob references. I assume it's not a popular comedy term for a penis in the US?
        • I assume it's not a popular comedy term for a penis in the US?

          Apparently not. I don't think they even know what a bell-end is.

  • This stuff has a ways to go. It's a major software undertaking to get it all to work. As an example, we recently bought a Prius with some web-enabled computer thingy in the dashboard. It's supposed to talk to the smartphone via Bluetooth and do all sorts of stuff. However, according to a list published by Toyota, only half of the integration features work properly with our iPhones. Basic things such as MP3 song time display are missing.
    • by kwerle (39371)

      we recently bought a Prius with some web-enabled computer thingy in the dashboard... with our iPhones. Basic things such as MP3 song time display are missing.

      That sounds wrong. Certainly our prius and iDevices communicate track information correctly.

  • Until that key moment when the Royal American Federation prohibits manual control that you'd actually lose your freedom, & that's not due for another 50 years. Besides, road deaths account for 1/50 of all deaths; we COULD undo that cause of death almost entirely, but no, let's just let them die because people might end up too stupid to know how to turn the governor off & then can't play IRL Mario Kart.
  • by HWguy (147772) on Thursday February 14, 2013 @01:44AM (#42892699)

    Except most of the manufacturers won't want to expend the effort to keep their old products up-to-date. Look forward to drive-by hackings of your buggy car firmware. And new web technologies relegating your $60k+ car to the status of a 5 year old PC.

  • by Kevin Burtch (13372) on Thursday February 14, 2013 @01:49AM (#42892721)

    A touchscreen dash is an absolutely horrid idea. Physical buttons can be accessed via muscle memory. A dynamic control with zero tactile feedback requires you to focus on it for every function. How can anyone in the automotive industry not see this as an enormous liability?

    Having a video or computer display in the line of sight of the driver is already illegal in most states (distraction) and having a computer in the front seat of a vehicle is illegal in at least California. I can't help but wonder how a 17" touchscreen with computer controls will be viewed by the police and court systems.

    • by AaronW (33736) on Thursday February 14, 2013 @02:49AM (#42892929) Homepage

      I have played with several touch screen interfaces on cars. I am most experienced with the one in my 2006 Prius. I have also played with them in the Fisker Karma and the Tesla Model S.

      It depends on how the touch screen is implemented. The touch screen in my Prius is actually fairly well designed, with most of the important buttons on the edge of the screen. The distraction caused by it is fairly minimal. When playing with the Tesla model S I noticed that they did something similar. The buttons are also fairly large and generally around the outside edge and many of the controls can easily be assigned to the steering wheel.

      I have seen other cars where the touch screen is unusable (i.e. the Fisker Karma). The touch screen on the Fisker Karma is horrible and creates a lot of distraction since the buttons are tiny, inconsistent and the screen is very hard to impossible to see during the day. In order to use it one must spend a lot more time looking at it and the buttons are hard to impossible to hit while driving since they are small and have to be hit exactly. It's an accident waiting to happen.

      At least with my Prius and the Tesla there is also voice input as well, though it is somewhat limited in my Prius and Tesla's is still under development from what I understand. My Prius also has good steering wheel support for most common functions so I rarely need to access the touch screen for things like the radio and climate control.

      Even the touch interface on the Navigation system on my Prius is generally well thought out. My biggest problem with the touch screen on my Prius is that there is sometimes noticeable lag. When I played with the Tesla there was no lag.

      On the Tesla one can easily assign different tasks to the steering wheel with no more distraction than looking at the speedometer since the menus are placed to the sides of it. On the Tesla the navigation map is also displayed just to the left of the speedometer as well so one doesn't have to look at the main display.

      As far as cloud support, users have already figured out the interface to use Tesla's cloud services in order to access the car, including downloading real-time data. Users have also started creating web based applications for the Tesla. It also looks like Tesla is using the QT toolkit for their touch screen if the web browser identifier string is any indication.

    • In the Ford vehicles, the touch screen is combined with voice recognition, so you don't have to take your hands off the wheel to adjust the interior temperature or call your mom or tell the car to play some Mozart. I use the touch screen when the car is not moving, but I use voice commands when I am driving. It seems to work pretty well.
  • No one will own cars (Score:5, Interesting)

    by brillow (917507) on Thursday February 14, 2013 @01:52AM (#42892731)

    What they are really afraid of is the fact that once cars become self-driving, no one will need to own one anymore.

    Technology is actually upended the business model of the entire autoindustry. They might innovate themselves right out of business.

    I mean seriously who cares about cloudplayer in a self-driving car? If it can drive itself I'll just leave my earbuds in.

    The most common vehicle in 10 years will be the autonomous Dodge caravan, taxiing us all around. Rich people will have maybe their own auto-Bently's or something, but the rest of us will just share a car.

    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward

      The most common vehicle in 10 years will be the autonomous Dodge caravan, taxiing us all around.

      You are dreaming. Actually, it's not a dream, it's a nightmare that only an idiot
      would want to see come true.

      In ten years people will be driving cars which are much the same as they are now.

    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward

      the fuck i'll be sharing a car with most of you... you are SLOBS. your cars are NASTY. from smoking to food to children to trash to just plain nasty people. disgusting is a good 25% of the cars on the road.

      A minor lesson i learned back when i was a kid i worked at a carwash for a year... and the nasty gross disgusting interiors i saw... from people who were paying $20-40 for a complete car service. These weren't broke mofos living in their cars... no. These were the middle and upper class folks.

      n

      • by Sockatume (732728)

        It's almost as if the people who kept their cars clean and tidy didn't visit the car wash.

      • by swillden (191260)

        no way am i sharing a car with any of those people. nope. you can't make me.

        Calm down. No one will try to make you share. You will be able to own your own car -- it'll cost an order of magnitude more than using an automated car service, but you'll have that option.

        In a world where self-driving cars are the norm, everyone will view vehicles the way people living in densely populated urban centers view them now: owning a car of your own will be an expensive extravagance, but you can do it if you choose to spend your money on it. Most people will just use the automated taxis, which

      • This is just the tip of the iceberg though. I keep my "stuff" in my car so I don't have to carry a huge man-purse everywhere. A generic fix-it kit in the trunk, medical kit in the glove box, device-specific holders for my electronics (as well as carefully routed power cords), plus a pen, pencil, utility knife, flashlight, map, and some work-related gear in case I get a call while I'm out. I've seriously considered getting a second, super-fuel-efficient car for longer trips (I drive a full sized truck which

        • by drinkypoo (153816)

          All of that crap can fit into a single bag if you omit the fix-it kit. You can have a cable dangling out that gets plugged into the lighter socket wherever you go. I use a JuiceBag which has a 10W solar panel for this purpose, so I can charge when away from the vehicle as well. (I got it on sale, those things are spendy at full price. nobody else wanted it because it was red, which I consider a feature, as it will make it easier to spot anyone running off with it.) If your self-driving rental car fails on a

    • by epyT-R (613989)

      I can't wait for this utopian socialist future where you have no control over anything in your environment as it's all owned by the state/corporate oligarc...err I mean 'the people'... Then your first mistake ends up being your last as access to everything is pulled, remotely, effectively ending your life. This is after you're publicly humiliated automatically on the net for the 'transgression.' Since this tech makes it so easy and cheap, you can expect those transgression lists to be long and full of ina

    • What they are really afraid of is the fact that once cars become self-driving, no one will need to own one anymore.

      Technology is actually upended the business model of the entire autoindustry. They might innovate themselves right out of business.

      I mean seriously who cares about cloudplayer in a self-driving car? If it can drive itself I'll just leave my earbuds in.

      The most common vehicle in 10 years will be the autonomous Dodge caravan, taxiing us all around. Rich people will have maybe their own auto-Bently's or something, but the rest of us will just share a car.

      ...like me, they'll own motorcycles, probably. Riding a bike (full disclosure: I love my Ducati 1098) is about as close to flying as you can get in two dimensions. The subset of the population that enjoys driving cars and riding bikes for the sheer exhilaration of it (vanishingly small, to be sure, but extant nonetheless) are immune to the marketing gimmicks you are basing your argument on. I have a BT-enabled comm system in my helmet that already lets me voice control my phone -- I can drag a knee at a

    • by Attila Dimedici (1036002) on Thursday February 14, 2013 @10:35AM (#42895321)
      The bureaucrats hope you are correct. It will be much easier to control people who do not have their own means of transportation that allows them to go where they want when they want. In the world you envision, you will only be able to go to places that the cars are programmed to go to and only when they are programmed to allow you to go there. That world would be distinctly divided into three classes: the elites, who for the most part can go where they want and get to decide where the second class are given access (these would be mostly government functionaries); the common folk, who are expected to meekly accept the limits established by the elites; and the criminal class, who hack the transportation system (or pay someone to do it for them) in order to go to places that are otherwise off limits to them.
      We would get there incrementally.
  • Nowadays it's pretty clear that anything with a processor will be connect to some cloud some time in the future, like it or not. What I don't get is the logic in the middle of the summary: how is having a touch screen a hint for cloud computing on the car? Not only having to take the eyes of the road just to change a radio station or increase the AC quite dangerous due to the lack of mechanical feedback, but the Amazon/Ford and Google efforts seem a lot more concrete when it comes to cloud uses. It just fee
    • by epyT-R (613989)

      Nowadays it's pretty clear that anything with a processor will be connect to some cloud some time in the future, like it or not.

      just when we thought we had gotten rid of slavery, its chains rise once again from hell...

  • So much of vehicle manufacturing is done in China that it is foolish to assume that organizations outside of China will continue to call the shots. At some point the Chinese market and manufacturing infrastructure will become dominant, and at that point decision making will start to be driven by those organizations, not external demands.

    An existing example in another market is the Boeing/Airbus duopoly. In the current world market no one outside of Europe or the US has a lot of control over what kinds of l

    • An existing example in another market is the Boeing/Airbus duopoly. In the current world market no one outside of Europe or the US has a lot of control over what kinds of long and intermediate passenger planes are built. (Short range passenger aircraft are a different story.) The Chinese are already working on joining this club, by the way.

      It is incredibly difficult to enter this market: pretty much everything has been swallowed up and the two major powers are supported heavily by their respective governmen

  • by jmcvetta (153563) on Thursday February 14, 2013 @02:30AM (#42892859)

    How long til a malicious person is able to crash (potentially lots of) cars in the real world by hacking into some cloud servers? Or make the cars run over pedestrians instead of avoid them?

    This is potentially a really serious problem, that people so far are ignoring. Maybe we need a law requiring physical isolation of a self-driving car's control computer from all networks. They need access to GPS data, but this can probably accommodated with special hardware that does its best to ensure only GPS data is passed in.

    • by Jeremi (14640)

      This is potentially a really serious problem, that people so far are ignoring

      Well, it's a potentially serious problem that you assume people are ignoring.

      I think any company smart enough to be capable of building a viable self-driving car is probably also smart enough to foresee the possibility of hackers and design their systems as securely as possible.

      It's not like there are engineers running around Google right now slapping their foreheads, saying "OMG did you see this Slashdot post? There are hackers on the Internet! And they might try to crash our cars!"

      • by epyT-R (613989)

        ... yet they can't seem to keep any of their current, much simpler software secure. Not just google either, but every software company in existence.. Software security is one of those intractable problems that gets exponentially harder as complexity increases..and self driving cars need far more complex heuristics and communication than typical network client software.

        When the day comes that every OS and application software is 100% provably secure, I MIGHT consider trusting one of those cars, nevermind a

    • by Dcnjoe60 (682885)

      How long til a malicious person is able to crash (potentially lots of) cars in the real world by hacking into some cloud servers? Or make the cars run over pedestrians instead of avoid them?

      This is potentially a really serious problem, that people so far are ignoring. Maybe we need a law requiring physical isolation of a self-driving car's control computer from all networks. They need access to GPS data, but this can probably accommodated with special hardware that does its best to ensure only GPS data is passed in.

      No need to hack. Just cut one off and force its AI to choose between hitting your car or a pedestrian. Prior to 9/11 nobody thought about flying a plane into a building. I'm pretty sure that the AI in self driving cars can't account for all of the crazy things people will come up with.

      • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

        by Anonymous Coward

        That can be done now to actual drivers. Do you know what the driver will do in 9 out 10 instances? Mentally freeze and hit whatever their car was pointed at, at the time it happened. Do you know why? Because statistically no one practices those situations to turn the ideal reaction into a habit. You can never design any system (or prepare any person) to account for every corner condition. You design (or prepare) for as many things as you can so that it's better than it would have been otherwise, then deal w

      • by drinkypoo (153816)

        Prior to 9/11 nobody thought about flying a plane into a building.

        That, sir, is pure bullshit. In fact, prior to 9/11 someone had thought about the possibility of a terrorist doing so, and had submitted a report on the subject, which was summarily ignored.

    • by kwerle (39371) <kurt@CircleW.org> on Thursday February 14, 2013 @03:14AM (#42893067) Homepage Journal

      That's some impressive FUD you've got going, there. But that's all it is.

      http://www.usacoverage.com/auto-insurance/how-many-driving-accidents-occur-each-year.html [usacoverage.com]

      And if it’s all summed up in a yearly basis,there are 5.25 million driving accidents that take place per year. Statistics show that each year,43,000 or more of the United States’ population die due to vehicular accidents and around 2.9 million people end up suffering light or severe injuries. In a certain five year period, there had been recorded a 25% of the driving population who encountered or were involved in car accidents. It is also affirmed that car accidents kill a child every 3 minutes.Statistics on the number of car accidents taking place in every state or country is normally based on medical or insurance records filed.

      But you're right, I'm sure. People are /such/ good drivers. There's no way we could improve on those numbers. It's probably not even worth trying.

      • by jmcvetta (153563)

        Self-driving cars are not a bad idea. Self-driving cars that can even potentially be hacked remotely, are a bad idea.

        • by drinkypoo (153816)

          Self-driving cars are not a bad idea. Self-driving cars that can even potentially be hacked remotely, are a bad idea.

          Self-driving cars are not a bad idea. Self-driving cars that roll on tires are stupid. We have long had the technology to guide vehicles without steering them, it is called rails. Cars only go where the road goes already. PRT is the answer. It will even let you keep your own vehicle.

    • by geekmux (1040042)

      How long til a malicious person is able to crash (potentially lots of) cars in the real world by hacking into some cloud servers? Or make the cars run over pedestrians instead of avoid them? This is potentially a really serious problem, that people so far are ignoring...

      This kind of scenario has been discussed already in relation to the self-driving car network of the future. I'm certain that once you sign for your new Federal drivers license you will sign away any rights to a lawsuit against the self-drive collective that will literally have an acceptable percentage of "oops" situations built into the system that controls cars in the future. Yes, the concept is scary, but really not any different than most other forms of automation. Acceptable losses in this case just

    • by Fnord666 (889225)

      They need access to GPS data, but this can probably accommodated with special hardware that does its best to ensure only GPS data is passed in.

      What happens when someone hacks the GPS data that the car is receiving and tells it that the car is 20 feet right of where it really is? The car will of course automatically adjust course by moving 20 feet left into oncoming traffic.

  • Obsolecense (Score:4, Insightful)

    by kombipom (1274672) on Thursday February 14, 2013 @03:19AM (#42893103) Journal

    The biggest problem I see with these systems is very rapid obsolescence. You'll generally replace a phone or tablet a lot more often than a car. There should be a standard port to attach a tablet to and the car manufacturer can offer software for all the major platforms, or you can choose to use something else. Instead we seem to be getting a bunch of built in tablets running code that we have no control over and can't replace. Is anybody sorting this out?

    • The easy solution is to trade in and get a new car every couple of years. Nobody expects their vintage 1950s Chevy to have all the modern bells and whistles. When you buy an old car, you revel in the nostalgia.
  • by 93 Escort Wagon (326346) on Thursday February 14, 2013 @03:37AM (#42893163)

    he's on a motorcycle.

  • The problem I see with more and more electronics is the loss of control, not just of the vehicle but also of your privacy. You are already driving with a black box in most vehicles, and access to that is not restricted to accident investigators - data gets pulled every time you have the car serviced, with you having nil control over how it is used.

    A secondary issue is that entertainment electronics is subject to far less security checks than the stuff that makes sure your engine runs best and that steers t

  • Everyone is going to have a smartphone in their pockets, which they'll change every 2 years. I'm hoping a new car will last longer than 2 years, so let's just leave the smart phone capabilities up to my smart phone.

    How about they just wifi up the car and leave me a slot to put a tablet or something?

  • I want my car reporting my rural speed transgressions directly to the cloud-connected police, so law enforcement can be efficiently vectored to intercept me.

    Better still, it can be wired to go "driverless" automatically and take me straight to the nearest court-house for doing 66 on a deserted back-country road posted 65.

    Judge Dred meets Knight Rider!

    • by Drethon (1445051)
      I think they would just wire the cars with a speed limiter based on the current street's speed limit... just so long as the car doesn't suddenly slow down to 25 on a freeway overpass because the road under the bridge has a lower speed limit.
      • I think they would just wire the cars with a speed limiter based on the current street's speed limit... just so long as the car doesn't suddenly slow down to 25 on a freeway overpass because the road under the bridge has a lower speed limit.

        Why would they do that? When the OP's suggestion would allow the government to generate revenue with a reduced expenditure, while yours would reduce the amount of revenue the government gets from traffic law violation tickets.

  • Am I the only one who thinks a touch screen is a *terrible* idea in a car, especially if the touch screen device is supposed to be used while driving? With conventional knobs and switches, you can often find what you want to do just by moving your hand to the approximate position and feeling for the appropriate control. I can operate my car radio without looking at it. But you're forced to look at a touch screen - in other words, stop looking where you're directing nearly two tons of metal to fiddle with so

    • by prefec2 (875483)

      This is not a problem, as you are not driven the car. The car drives itself and you are just a passenger. Would be cool to share the car with others. Oh wait, we already have them, they are called buses. Nobody want to have other people in their car.

  • The future is, where you do not own a car. If you need one you borrow one. Of course it can communicate with your phone otherwise it would not know what you mean by "drive me home". Furthermore, in metropolitan areas, other means of public transport are much more efficient and easier to implement. For example, street cars, underground trains, smaller and bigger buses, which are easy to access and allow you to bring stuff with you, like buggies, trolleys or bikes. Cars supplement that, can be called, like ca

    • You're neglecting cultural aspects. People will continue to use cars, even when other means are more affortable and practical, because a car isn't just a means of transport. It's a symbol and statement of freedom: The power to go where you want, when you want, bound by no schedule and dependant on no-one. Less so in Europe than the US. Over there, owning their first car is one of the big rites of passage for teenagers.

  • In one hand, you have the greed of the entire industry, wanting to put every single communications device they can think of inside a car, and connect it all online, and then sell all the statistics we all will generate to target advertising.

    In the other hand, I have the countless deaths racked up by just texting on the road today. I believe if we left it unchecked, it would likely surpass every other killer (including alcohol) on the road, if it already hasn't received this coveted title of dishonor.

    Not ev

  • The engine, body and other car-ish stuff may be good for thirty years, but in five the in-car entertainment and cloudy navigation systems will be as obsolete an eight-track. Time to go out and buy a new car. Welcome to the upgrade cycle: The computer and smartphone industries got there long ago.

  • What I want.... (Score:3, Interesting)

    by willy everlearn (82796) on Thursday February 14, 2013 @08:31AM (#42894467)

    I just want a plain AFFORDABLE electric car. 100 miles a day on an over night charge. $20000 or less. What is so hard about that?

  • I still want a V8, rear wheel drive, manual transmission car but self driving cars are something I want. I may be a good driver (have not damaged a car in driving since I was a teen, even on icy roads) but being able to spend the time going to and from work productively rather than watching traffic would be awesome. On the other hand I want an override as I'm not sure I'd trust a car programmed in California to West Michigan winters...
  • The NYT writer lied. It's over for that story. But the damage is done.

    He was told to do certain things. Instead, he:
    -Turned the heat up.
    -Speeded, consistently. Over 80 mph at some point.
    -Didn't stay at the supercharger long enough, almost every time - and lied about it.
    -Pulled away for 60+ mile trip even though he knew it only had a charge for less than 40 miles left.
    -Circled a supercharger station, for some reason.
    -Lied about the car going dead. It did not.

    Broder should lose his job. Read it, please!
    http:/ [wired.com]

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