Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Chrome Software Google News

Google Releases Chrome 25 With Voice Recognition Support 93

Posted by timothy
from the say-what-you-mean dept.
An anonymous reader writes "Google on Thursday released Chrome version 25 for Windows, Mac, and Linux. While Chrome 24 was largely a stability release, Chrome 25 is all about features, including voice recognition support via the newly added Web Speech API and the blocking of silent extension installation. You can update to the latest release now using the browser's built-in silent updater, or download it directly from google.com/chrome." But if you're more interested in the growing raft of Google-branded hardware than running Google OSes, some good news (via Liliputing) about the newly released Pixel: Bill Richardson of Google posted on Thursday that the Pixel can boot Linux Mint, and explained how users can follow his example, by taking advantage of new support for a user-provided bootloader.
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

Google Releases Chrome 25 With Voice Recognition Support

Comments Filter:
  • Clever! (Score:5, Funny)

    by Austerity Empowers (669817) on Friday February 22, 2013 @11:32PM (#42987327)

    I see what you did there, this is social engineering. Who is going to shout at their monitor "Natalie Portman grits petrified porn"?

    Fappist: "Natalie Portman grits petrified porn"
                Chrome: "Madly norman sits petrified corn"
                Fappist: "NATALIE PORTMAN GRITS PETRIFIED PORN"
                Chrome: "Actually foreman knits electrified morn"
                FAPPIST: "GRRRRR! NATALIE PORTMAN GRITS PETRIFIED PORN!!!!"
               

  • by joelleo (900926) on Friday February 22, 2013 @11:41PM (#42987363)

    One of these days, I'll have a supported version of Chrome which can address more than 4GB of memory in my !Linux boxen...

    • by ChunderDownunder (709234) on Saturday February 23, 2013 @12:02AM (#42987429)

      Aside from being '64 bit clean', why would you care about RAM?

      Doesn't each Chrome tab run in a separate process, i.e. say each tab addresses 2GB, if you're have 8 tabs open you're maxing out your 16GB workstation??

      Running a 32bit browser on a 64bit OS can be a blessing - Running Chrome on Windows means I don't have to disable (for security reasons) the 64bit Java Plugin the JDK installs.

      • by Mashiki (184564) <mashiki@NOsPam.gmail.com> on Saturday February 23, 2013 @12:26AM (#42987519) Homepage

        Doesn't each Chrome tab run in a separate process, i.e. say each tab addresses 2GB, if you're have 8 tabs open you're maxing out your 16GB workstation??

        Yes, each tab runs in a seperate process. Hell I can't even max out what I have with 8GB on my home machine, or my work machine sitting beside me with 32GB. It simply dumps the tab that's not being used to the pagefile, and with the pagefile on a SSD if I switch to it, I can't notice that there's even a difference in access time.

        Though 64bit binaries would be nice, though we won't see that happening until OS's start to abandon 32bit like they did 8bit and 16bit.

      • by joelleo (900926) on Saturday February 23, 2013 @04:09AM (#42988013)

        It boils down to a "64 bit clean" system. I'd prefer nothing die due to artificially limited resources -memory, in this case - being exhausted.

      • by thetoadwarrior (1268702) on Saturday February 23, 2013 @06:43AM (#42988347) Homepage
        Google is the only one still on 32-bit. I'm going to put that down to laziness. This is the company after all that relied on wine on Linux for some of their software. For such a bunch of intelligent people they're lazy and half assed a lot of the times, imo.
        • by ChunderDownunder (709234) on Saturday February 23, 2013 @06:56AM (#42988377)

          I thought the default builds for Firefox were still 32 bit?

          • by ChunderDownunder (709234) on Saturday February 23, 2013 @07:05AM (#42988393)

            (On windows)

            • by dririan (1131339) on Saturday February 23, 2013 @09:25AM (#42988707)
              You are correct, Firefox is 32-bit on Windows. I believe Chrome may be more suitable for 64-bit on Windows than Firefox, as well (but I could be wrong here). Because of Chrome's multi-process model, compatibility with 32-bit plugins should be fairly trivial. The process running the plugin can be 32-bit (for plugins that are 32-bit only, such as Flash IIRC), but the rest of the browser's processes can be 64-bit. I know that Firefox does run plugins in a separate process (open Firefox, go to a site that uses some plugin, open Task Manager, and notice at least one "plugin-container.exe" process), but I don't know how easily plugin-container could be adapted to support 32-bit plugins on 64-bit Firefox.
          • by thetoadwarrior (1268702) on Saturday February 23, 2013 @08:45AM (#42988611) Homepage
            For Windows but that's the other thing. It's not so much that everyone else doesn't want to move on. It's that Microsoft is yet again very accommodating to people who want to stick in the past and Google seems to be just worrying about the lowest common denominator in the Microsoft world and the rest of us don't exist apparently. I'm sure some of it has to do with supporting XP too but if a company like Firefox or Opera can do a 32 and 64 bit release then one of the biggest companies in the world shouldn't have a problem. It's not like Webkit hasn't been done in 64-bit. Safari has it.
        • The difference between a Rolls Royce and a Volkswagen Beetle is in the 10% that costs 90% of the price/time. One of the reasons Apple did so well with its products is that it at least went for 5% at not to much extra. The "it just works" praise Apple often gets means a REALLY boring job for someone who doesn't get to build anything exciting and new but just has to fix small trivial bugs that only occur during a blue moon but are the difference between something working and NOT working.

          Consider this: Java. No deb files just yum and rpm support.

          Chrome has deb packages for ubuntu.

          Opera has special deb packages for mint to.

          Now which is the piece of software recommended to be removed and which is the browser that just resumes where it left off, has build in mouse support, multi-account password managment build in and works on the most number of environments?

          Building so many packages is a boring task but it is the difference between a polished product and a cutting edge product.

          There is a man at Rolls Royce whose only job is to hand paint a stripe on the car. Something tells me that from this you can conclude that the paint job on a rolls is better then that on an Brazilian build beetle. It takes a lot of people taking exceptional care in seemingly trivial detail to get a truly polished experience out the door.

          It is one reason Americans make better entertainment movies. No European would think of putting fake scaffolding on top of a skyscraper to make it look taller. Americans do... it makes for better entertainment movies because some guy in props is spending time thinking how to make a sky scraper look even better.

          Google releases a lot of stuff but they never ever really finish it because they all moved on to the next big thing. It "works". You won't see a cutting edge Rolls Royce long after other car makers have already implemented a new feature.

          Make your choice, polish or cutting edge.

        • by DragonWriter (970822) on Tuesday February 26, 2013 @01:21PM (#43015757)

          Google is the only one still on 32-bit. I'm going to put that down to laziness. This is the company after all that relied on wine on Linux for some of their software. For such a bunch of intelligent people they're lazy

          Not doing extra work beyond that which is required for the goal you are attempting to achieve is efficient, not lazy (well, it isn't lazy-as-in-indolent, it is lazy-as-in-Haskell.)

      • by cronot (530669) on Saturday February 23, 2013 @09:07AM (#42988671)

        I agree with this argument on Windows. On OSX though, 32-bit chrome is a problem incidentally because of Java: on recent updates (past year) the 32-bit Java plugin on OSX was disabled. You can say what you want about Java, its vulnerabilities and shortcomings as a platform, but the fact is that many sites (banks or such) still require it, and that means I have to use Safari for those sites. It's not a big problem, but it's incovenient, and OSX, compared to Windows, has a much higher ratio of software and system components with 64-bit binaries than Windows, so there's very little reason to keep Chrome clinging to a legacy binary format on that platform.

      • by Anonymous Coward on Sunday February 24, 2013 @06:48PM (#42997999)

        2 gig is a virtual address space, not physical RAM. Where have all the nerds gone?

    • by kthreadd (1558445) on Saturday February 23, 2013 @02:19AM (#42987795)

      One of these days, I'll have a supported version of Chrome which can address more than 4GB of memory in my !Linux boxen...

      Well, maybe you could use an open source browser and build it for 64 bit instead of using Chrome.

    • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday February 23, 2013 @02:36AM (#42987835)

      What in the actual fuck are you talking about?

      $ file /opt/google/chrome/chrome /opt/google/chrome/chrome: ELF 64-bit LSB shared object, x86-64, version 1 (SYSV), dynamically linked (uses shared libs), for GNU/Linux 2.6.15, BuildID[sha1]=....
      $ uname -om
      x86_64 GNU/Linux

    • by Vegemeister (1259976) on Saturday February 23, 2013 @01:37PM (#42990079)
      You really don't want 64 bit Chrom(e/ium). All it does is waste more memory. I've seen 64 bit Chromium use over 1 GiB for only 20 tabs. At the moment, any possible performance benefit of the extra registers is offset by the greater cache footprint of a 64 bit build. The future is the x32 ABI. AMD64 only makes sense for things that mmap large files and work with huge amounts of data.
  • by KiloByte (825081) on Friday February 22, 2013 @11:59PM (#42987421)

    It looks like they're making a marketing mistake: they make it sound as if they added recognition of arbitrary text.

    There are only two things voice recognition is useful for:
    * taking a small number of distinct commands
    * producing nonsense poetry that keeps rhythm and rhyme with input voice

    A small corpus of words can be distinguished between pretty easily -- as long as no two are similar to each other. In a real language, with many thousands of words, even a human has a hard time without understanding the subject matter and filling the gaps from context. In fact, what you hear is mostly gaps -- just try to transcribe a series of random words with any real speed. Or, for another example: in a written text, randomly permute all letters except the first and last in every word -- it will still be pretty understandable if you recognize its sense or not at all if you don't. And recognizing the sense is an AI-hard task.

  • by hemp (36945) on Saturday February 23, 2013 @12:07AM (#42987451) Homepage Journal

    How do you pronounce "Goatse" anyhow?

  • by xushi (740195) on Saturday February 23, 2013 @12:08AM (#42987455)

    Not to sound like a rant but I've almost had it with their countless bugs with password saving.. I tried every trick on the net short of abandoning it for another browser.. it won't save my passwords anymore, it never updates my existing passwords, and the ones I delete won't ask me to add them anymore.. And googling around I see countless others who have the same problems since 2009.

    No I don't want to use another plugin, I'd prefer to stick to google's own as much as possible and not replicate features.. I just would have thought Google would put more effort into this seeing as how large they are and how anal they were when it came to interviewing for a job there. I expected better...

    Let's hope the message gets through..

  • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday February 23, 2013 @12:13AM (#42987467)

    What's with the releases every couple months? What's with the bloat? Why don't they address speed and stability bugs that have been open for two years?

    Oh wait. This is a Chrome thread. Google gets a pass. Never mind.

    • by fluffy99 (870997) on Saturday February 23, 2013 @12:25AM (#42987515)

      What's with the releases every couple months? What's with the bloat? Why don't they address speed and stability bugs that have been open for two years?

      Oh wait. This is a Chrome thread. Google gets a pass. Never mind.

      They're trying real hard to keep up with the bloat and stability issues of Mozilla? Google Chrome wanted to add features rapidly like Mozilla, and Mozilla envied the rapid release of Chrome. Not sure who's winning that battle. IE10 maybe, but it depends on your definition of 'winning' (no, not the Charlie Sheen drug induced euphoria definition).

    • by DragonWriter (970822) on Tuesday February 26, 2013 @02:01PM (#43016177)

      What's with the releases every couple months?

      Eliminating waste -- costs that have been incurred (e.g., by investing programmer-hours in development) that are not delivering value (e.g., by being incorporated in a shipping product) are a form of waste. Basic application of Lean principles.

      What's with the bloat?

      One user's bloat is lots of other users' value.

      Why don't they address speed and stability bugs that have been open for two years?

      Probably because for those particular issues, the expected value of the fix (given the severity and the conditions which trigger them) divided by the expected cost is lower than for other fixes and features, and Google is focussed on doing the work that matters most (highest value for cost) first.

  • by YoungHack (36385) on Saturday February 23, 2013 @12:28AM (#42987529)

    Since this morning's update on Ubuntu I can't pull up Gmail. It's pretty darned annoying and now I've gone back to Firefox to wait for the next update to fix whatever is really busted.

  • by waspleg (316038) on Saturday February 23, 2013 @12:50AM (#42987605) Journal

    No? Wake me if it ever does.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday February 23, 2013 @12:51AM (#42987609)

    Oh boy, time for Chrome to get a pass for implementing new non-standard features instead of not fixing their broken bits. After all, only Firefox and IE deserve such scathing criticism, because they're not the cool new kid on the block. /sarcasm

    Good idea, though. I'll bet if Google and Mozilla teamed up on a browser, it would end world hunger and save the dolphins.

  • by ouachiski (835136) on Saturday February 23, 2013 @02:38AM (#42987839)
    I'm 31 and I am the current generation of consumerists...I can type faster than I can talk (I am special because I was taught to type when I was 7). I was in high school before computers where common. kids now have been typing as long as they have been writing. I don't see speech recognition as being to terribly important, but it does have its use cases.
    • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday February 23, 2013 @03:38AM (#42987971)

      It's the same for me. I grew up with computers in the house and for roughly 80% of that time I was either learning programming/scripting languages or using them. It's gotten to the point where typing is every bit as natural as talking, even on poor interfaces like a touch screen keyboard.

      Honestly I like the idea of speech recognition, have tried many solutions, hated them all. The dictation variants almost always lack any serious attempt at inferring grammar, which leaves us saying "period", "comma", "semi-colon"; it just doesn't feel natural and waste time. The control variants always boil down to speaking very specific commands in very specific orders, again it doesn't feel natural.

      For me to seriously adopt a speech recognition it needs to understand what I say, not just the words I say. The way modern OSes and modern programs are set up a lot can be derived just from the words used and a thesaurus. For example: "play random songs by Metallica". 'Play' narrows it down to game, music, or video. 'Songs' narrows it down to music, at this point it should know to look into my music library. 'by Metallica' implies an artist so it should filter out everything in the music library that doesn't have the artist tag set to 'Metallica'. Random is a function of just about every media player out there, it doesn't even need to decode that I mean "in random order", it just needs to find the UI widget with 'random' in the name. I didn't specific which player to use, so it should default to whatever I have set in my OS as the preferred music player.

      I'm not saying everything will be so easy to decode the meaning of. But start with the easy stuff to get people interested in it. Spark a fire under the asses of more hardcore developers that will put in the time and effort to come up with reliable and efficient algorithms to decode more complex phrases.

    • by oobayly (1056050) on Saturday February 23, 2013 @04:27AM (#42988043)

      Yup, a while ago I wondered when Google would bring Google now and search to a PC until I realised what's the point.

      It's something I use all the time on my phone because (even for an English accent) it can be quicker for certain tasks than a soft keyboard. However typing on a proper keyboard will always be faster for me.

    • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday February 23, 2013 @06:37AM (#42988327)

      Do you still type as fast on a tiny touch screen keyboard?

      Also, voice recognition is kind of CLI for the masses: instead of going through the start menu, picking the application, getting to the right sub-menu...etc you just input your command with parameters and get the result without all the intermediate waiting and searching through menus. "Computer, set alarm for 8AM repeats on workdays." seems to me much easier than the way I currently set an alarm on my android phone.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday February 23, 2013 @02:47AM (#42987861)

    http://ftp.mozilla.org/pub/mozilla.org/firefox/nightly/latest-mozilla-central/

  • One of my favourite spontaneous epithets being, "Bite me!"

    I'm sure inventive Slashdotters can devise even more entertaining variations.

  • by emgarf (727623) on Saturday February 23, 2013 @05:58AM (#42988273)
    "Display bookmark sidebar."
  • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday February 23, 2013 @07:04AM (#42988389)

    Google has joined the ranks of Microsoft. If it's Google, I no longer want it.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday February 23, 2013 @07:57AM (#42988499)

    Chrome 24 hat reasonable support for MathML.
    In Chrome 25 beta the rendering was even better.
    The final version has no support for MathML at all.
    Is this progress?

    • by gniv (600835) on Saturday February 23, 2013 @04:56PM (#42991313)
      From the press release: "We’ve also resolved a high severity security issue by disabling MathML in this release. The WebKit MathML implementation isn’t quite ready for prime time yet but we are excited to enable it again in a future release once the security issues have been addressed."
  • by Cyric (15624) on Saturday February 23, 2013 @10:04AM (#42988839)

    I have not had the opportunity, but is voice disabled by default and the user can selectively turn it on? I don't mean is the checkbox checked to turn it off ... is it actually off and not phoning home?

    • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday February 23, 2013 @12:14PM (#42989517)
      Trying the demo is instructive in this case. It asked (in the bar at the top of the browser) whether you wanted to allow the page to use the microphone. So unless you allow it, no mic. This seems wise. The recognition was pretty good, but continues to have problems mapping pauses and inflections into things like commas and periods. You still have to actually say those words. So, for example, to complete this sentence you would say: So comma for example comma to complete this sentence you would say colon Not exactly the way I would want to say it. Especially since trying to get this:

      Sometimes, you have to actually say the word "comma" and you have to actually say the word period

      ends up as this:Sometimes, you have to actually say the word quote, unquote and you have to actually say the word.

      In other words - the recog for comma and period is set to ALWAYS treat them as punctuation. They need to do this more naturally. Most people know how to pause for a moment when a comma or period should be inserted. Make this work.
  • by citizenr (871508) on Saturday February 23, 2013 @10:13AM (#42988873) Homepage

    Google - the front runner of innovation :)
    Btw I think this has something to do with Google Glass - those glasses will be just an aux display for the phone. Phone needs to have good voice recognition integration. To get there in time they are starting with pc browser (10 years too late).

  • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday February 23, 2013 @12:05PM (#42989467)

    Computer, Stop AutoScroll

    One can Dream...

  • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday February 23, 2013 @12:08PM (#42989479)

    Imagine searching for porn using voice recognition.

  • by ubertopf (693957) on Saturday February 23, 2013 @12:10PM (#42989489)

    I don't know whether this has been mentioned before, but the big problem with Google's approach is that it won't allow me to define a formal grammar as the "set of things the user might reasonably say". Dictionary recognition, as is employed here and on the Android phones, has the big disadvantage that I would need some kind of natural language understanding on the (already error-prone result) for anything but dictating text.

    It is in essence a projection of voice to an N-Best list of recognition results. No if I could specify a grammar (e.g. per SRGS), I could have semantic annotation per SSML and use voice to actually control an application.

    • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday February 23, 2013 @06:58PM (#42992031)

      Because it's being run on their server, so unless they want to host everyone's grammars and keep them straight, you're boned.

      We actually implemented voice nav in our website years ago for tablet xp users using Windows's recognition, by having a bunch of people read the menu entries over and over and making a list of everything that the computer spat out. Probably could have done passable using soundex or the like but eh.

      • by ubertopf (693957) on Sunday February 24, 2013 @02:48PM (#42996357)

        Meant to say SISR, not SSML.

        It would be perfectly reasonable to send the SRGS grammar along with the voice data. It would even help Google with speech recognition as the search graph (assuming HMMs here), would be way smaller as opposed to those employing a full-blown dictionary grammar. Not accepting a grammar and only returning an N-Best list makes it pretty much unusable for anything non-trivial. What happened to all those concepts developed as part of EMMA/VoiceXML? It seems like the Web Speech API ignores everything that came before and went for the most naive approach.

    • by DragonWriter (970822) on Tuesday February 26, 2013 @02:19PM (#43016385)

      I don't know whether this has been mentioned before, but the big problem with Google's approach is that it won't allow me to define a formal grammar as the "set of things the user might reasonably say".

      AFAICT from reading the API spec and surrounding information is that's not a problem with "Google's approach", its a problem with the fact that the W3C Speech API Community Group couldn't come to a consensus on the grammar format(s) to support in the Web Speech API, so that while the API adopted in the group's final report specifies containers for grammars and how to attach them to recognition requests, it doesn't specify any actual formats for grammars.

      Since the mission of the group was to come up with a consensus limited-subset specification as a step on the road to a specification that would meet the full set of use cases set out by the Final Report of the Speech Incubator Group's final report, it makes sense for an implementation of the Web Speech API not to adopt an approach on grammars that would fail to be forward-compatible with the anticipated future specification, since that would encourage building applications that would be broken under the expected follow-on full-featured speech API, which can be expected to retain compatibility with the limited-subset API in the areas covered by that API, but is less likely to do so in areas not covered by the limited-subset API.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday February 23, 2013 @02:06PM (#42990255)

    I'm running slackware, so I download the rpm and convert it to a tgz. I've just done that with the 64 bit rpm version, but it's only chrome 24, not 25. Has anyone else been able to download version 25?

  • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday February 23, 2013 @07:31PM (#42992217)

    can it be set up so we can say fuck off chrome and it will uninstall?

  • by Lord Kano (13027) on Saturday February 23, 2013 @10:11PM (#42993029) Homepage Journal

    Let me know when the geniuses over at Google finally figure out how to release a version of Chrome that has a fucking menu bar. Until then, I'll stick to FireFox and Opera.

    LK

  • by Anonymous Coward on Sunday February 24, 2013 @10:24AM (#42995065)

    Why does everyone get worked up about face recognition, linguistics applied to posts, etc. as an invasion of privacy but not one comments on the implications for privacy of this kind of technology?

  • by Anonymous Coward on Friday March 01, 2013 @03:00PM (#43047787)

    Seems like for the past ten years I'm constantly reading: "New feature in product X" where new_feature is something that's been around and usable for years already.

What is worth doing is worth the trouble of asking somebody to do.

Working...