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Communications Spam

'This Is Your Second and Final Notice' Robocallers Revealed 235

Posted by Soulskill
from the hello-sir-madam dept.
nbauman writes "A New York Times consumer columnist tracked down the people who run a 'This is your second and final notice" robocall operation. The calls came from Account Management Assistance, which promises to negotiate lower credit card rates with banks. One woman paid them $1,000, and all they did was give her a limited-time zero-percent credit card that she could have gotten herself. AMA has a post office box in Orlando, Florida. The Better Business Bureau has a page for Your Financial Ladder, which does business as Account Management Assistance, and as Economic Progress. According to a Florida incorporation filing, Economic Progress is operated by Brenda Helfenstine, with her husband Tony. The Arkansas attorney general has sued Your Financial Ladder for violating the Telemarketing Consumer Fraud and Abuse Prevention Act. The Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services investigated Your Financial Ladder, but the investigator went to 1760 Sundance Drive, St. Cloud, which turned out to be a residence, and gave up. The Times notes that you can type their phone number (855-462-3833) into http://800notes.com/ and get lots of reports on them."
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'This Is Your Second and Final Notice' Robocallers Revealed

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  • by Anonymous Coward on Sunday February 24, 2013 @04:41PM (#42997093)
    These fuckers relentless harassed my grandmother in her final days despite my efforts to put her on the do not call list and working with her telephone company to try to identify them.

    Take all their money. All of it. Take it all and put it into something that helps the elderly.
    • by Anonymous Coward on Sunday February 24, 2013 @04:48PM (#42997147)
      Oh come on, man, you wouldn't have anything on your conscious if you left them to die in the everglades? I mean, think of the poor alligators that would have to eat their rotten fucking flesh.
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward

      Well, you've got their address.

      Now would be a fantastic time to pay them a visit.

      You know what we do to spammers.

      • by Frosty Piss (770223) * on Sunday February 24, 2013 @04:51PM (#42997179)

        1760 Sundance Drive
        St. Cloud, Florida 32771

        http://goo.gl/maps/9P4BX [goo.gl]

        • by Anonymous Coward on Sunday February 24, 2013 @04:58PM (#42997243)

          1760 Sundance Drive
          St. Cloud, Florida 32771

          http://goo.gl/maps/9P4BX [goo.gl]

          Looks like an easy target for a Predator drone ...

          • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

            Too quick, too painless. People like this need to suffer, death isn't a sufficient deterrent. If your life sucked as badly as theirs, you may even welcome it. The only way to discourage this form of bottom feeding is suffering, lots and lots of suffering. Letting them live, visibly scarred, and in full view of the public may demonstrate that while we will dispose of murderers and rapists, trolls will live as a warning to others in what may as well be an eternity of torment.

            • by plover (150551) on Sunday February 24, 2013 @06:38PM (#42997941) Homepage Journal

              tl;dr - "To the pain."

            • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

              by Frosty Piss (770223) *

              You know, that's exactly why I object to the Death Penalty: It's just too easy for the criminal.

              And don't fool yourself, it is MUCH more expensive to prosecute a Death Penalty case through all the appeals to the final needle in the arm, than it is to lock 'em up in a tine cell with no windows for a life of ever increasing insanity.

              Of course my morality objects to that as well, so when people ask me about the Death Penalty, I simply walk around in circles talking to myself...

            • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

              by sjames (1099)

              People like them occasionally make me ponder that age old question, "is it possible to send a fart in the mail?".

              What would it take to properly preserve a fart so that when they open the envelope or package, they can 'enjoy' the full aroma and know without doubt that they have just received a fart. Bonus points if there is a way to allow them to experience the puff of warmth as well.

            • by SharpFang (651121)

              A predator drone with napalm bombs?

        • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

          by Anonymous Coward
          Good news everyone! It is near Alligator Lake!
      • by WWJohnBrowningDo (2792397) on Sunday February 24, 2013 @05:01PM (#42997261)

        You know what we do to spammers.

        In a perfect world... spammers would get caught, go to jail, and share a cell with many men who have enlarged their penisses, taken Viagra and are looking for a new relationship.

        • In a perfect world... spammers would get caught, go to jail, and share a cell with many men who have enlarged their penisses, taken Viagra and are looking for a new relationship.

          In a perfect world, pervasive rape in jail will not be subject of gleeful jokes (it'd be funny if it weren't a common issue). I would like to see spammers go to jail too, but not like this.

          Even better, maybe we can fine spammers for "whatever the made + X%" and ban them from using computers for a while. This way they can work off their debt to society with some manual labor - outside of jail would be fine too.

          • by Nidi62 (1525137) on Sunday February 24, 2013 @07:50PM (#42998491)

            In a perfect world... spammers would get caught, go to jail, and share a cell with many men who have enlarged their penisses, taken Viagra and are looking for a new relationship.

            In a perfect world, pervasive rape in jail will not be subject of gleeful jokes (it'd be funny if it weren't a common issue). I would like to see spammers go to jail too, but not like this.

            In a perfect world, we wouldn't need prisons, because people would actually obey society's laws and respect the property, dignity, and person of other people.

            • by aztracker1 (702135) on Sunday February 24, 2013 @08:46PM (#42998823) Homepage
              In a perfect world there wouldn't for-profit prisons, that have lower standards, higher infraction numbers, and higher rates of 'inmate' crimes leading to longer detention terms. (Not to mention the shear corruption). The US has a higher ratio of prisoners that pretty much the anywhere else.
              • by Phrogman (80473)

                Because Prison in the US is like anything else - its been turned into a business so that corporations can profit off it. Its the modern day equivalent of slave labour, or perhaps more accurately indentured servitude.

              • by GNious (953874)

                The US is simply doing it wrong - one of our politicians suggested outsourcing the imprisonment of the hardest criminals to Russia....

                Yes, I kinda support that idea.

          • by Pseudonym (62607)

            In a perfect world, pervasive rape in jail will not be subject of gleeful jokes (it'd be funny if it weren't a common issue). I would like to see spammers go to jail too, but not like this.

            I agree, and furthermore it bugs me that this is one of the few places where rape jokes are still apparently socially acceptable. It's wrong to make jokes about this.

            Having said that, I do concede that the temptation to make a joke about typical spam subjects was overwhelming, and I don't hold it against the GP for giving in.

            • by rHBa (976986)

              I agree, and furthermore it bugs me that this is one of the few places where rape jokes are still apparently socially acceptable.

              I don't think he was joking.

        • by msauve (701917) on Sunday February 24, 2013 @06:33PM (#42997917)
          "In a perfect world... spammers would get caught, go to jail, and share a cell"...

          with a telephone which rings randomly, but at least once an hour, for their entire multi-year term. Anytime they fail to answer the phone, their prison term is extended by a month.
        • by Paradise Pete (33184) on Sunday February 24, 2013 @07:52PM (#42998505) Journal

          In a perfect world... spammers would get caught, go to jail

          Your perfect world contains spammers and jails? You should try to get a refund.

        • by kdemetter (965669)

          In a perfect world spammers would not exist.

      • by MacDork (560499)

        You know what we do to spammers

        You do know that spam is defined as unsolicited commericial email, right? What these people are doing is not spam. It is fraud. Its unfortunate, but they would be subject to far greater fines if they were simply annoying people with spam. $15000 per message. With fraud, they'll probably get a slap on the wrist at best. You know, like all those bankers that fraudulently sold bad loans as AAA rated debts and crashed the market in 2008. This story is evidence of it.

    • by amiga3D (567632) on Sunday February 24, 2013 @04:50PM (#42997167)

      Kind of extreme.......well, maybe not. My father is elderly and it's like he's under assault by these low life scum. There are so many organizations that live off of these kind of scams. I'd like to see drastic action taken.

      • by slick7 (1703596)

        Kind of extreme.......well, maybe not. My father is elderly and it's like he's under assault by these low life scum. There are so many organizations that live off of these kind of scams. I'd like to see drastic action taken.

        If it wasn't for the greedy banksters and their bought dog, in the back pocket politicians as well as all the incompetent bureaucratic minions whose only joy is making others miserable, this would be a really nice place. Then I could stop praying to the deity who would listen and erase this piss-ant planet once and for all.

    • by gmack (197796)

      The magic words are "I have power of attorney" (even if it's not true) once they think that the person they are calling cannot legally agree to anything they usually back off. They don't respect the law, their only worry is if they get payed or not.

    • by eksith (2776419)
      That's horrible. And it's well within their MO; they always target the infirm and the weakest first since they're more likely to fall pray to this. Modern day vultures
    • howdy y'all,

      this is my fave way that telemarketers are dealt with. well, it's science fiction, but the idea is _delightful_! [*grin*] take a look at the 3rd paragraph here ...
      Sluggy Freelance - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
      - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sluggy_Freelance#Other_guest_strips_and_crossovers [wikipedia.org]
      "Also, the first two novels of Ringo's distant-future Council Wars series have appearances by an irascible, treacherous, switchblade-toting, telemarketer-hating AI in a rabbit-shaped body—created by

    • by smartin (942)

      I'm sorry to say that while the Do No Call List seemed to work well for several years it is now completely being ignored. I guess the telespammers realized that it had no teeth. I really hope that the FCC or who ever runs it takes a company like this and makes a serious fucking example of them.

  • FFS (Score:5, Interesting)

    by fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) on Sunday February 24, 2013 @04:48PM (#42997149) Journal

    Why is it that the attack-dog AGs of the world are ready to go when somebody runs wget contrary to a site's terms of service; but people like this are allowed to operate unchecked?

    • Re:FFS (Score:5, Interesting)

      by PhamNguyen (2695929) on Sunday February 24, 2013 @04:53PM (#42997199)

      I would guess that it relates to a certain way of thinking about the world, where everything an individual does on their own is a criminal matter, and everything a person does for a company is a civil matter.

      It probably also relates to the "just doing my job" mentality where something becomes less morally objectionable merely because you're doing it as part of a job.

    • Because prosecuting this crime does not attract big money political campaign donors.

    • Re:FFS (Score:5, Interesting)

      by Tom (822) on Sunday February 24, 2013 @05:26PM (#42997407) Homepage Journal

      They do not scam large corporations with deep pockets.

      Basically, a good scammer knows to not scam marks that can cause him trouble. You can scam a million people with no resources to fight you and be fine. But go against one mark who does have the resources and you're toast.

      Humans might be the top of the food chain in the animal kingdom, but we are the bottom of the food chain in the society we have built. Corporations, criminals, politicians - every parasite in existence preys upon the common citizen first and foremost, because we are the easy targets.

      • They do not scam large corporations with deep pockets.

        Basically, a good scammer knows to not scam marks that can cause him trouble. You can scam a million people with no resources to fight you and be fine. But go against one mark who does have the resources and you're toast.

        Exactly. That is also why they try to avoid politicians. The auto-warranty scam was going on for months, than they robo-called a few politicians and the investigation started.

    • by jcr (53032)

      My guess is the spammers pay bribes.

      -jcr

    • by guttentag (313541)

      Why is it that the attack-dog AGs of the world are ready to go when somebody runs wget contrary to a site's terms of service; but people like this are allowed to operate unchecked?

      Maybe it's because they're supposed to be using cURL? Attorneys General have a tendency to get wrapped up in political nonsense.

      [ducks]

    • Re:FFS (Score:5, Insightful)

      by icebike (68054) on Sunday February 24, 2013 @06:27PM (#42997873)

      Why is it that the attack-dog AGs of the world are ready to go when somebody runs wget contrary to a site's terms of service; but people like this are allowed to operate unchecked?

      Well, when Florida lumps their "Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services" into one agency, you really can't expect much from them except bullshit.

  • Based in Florida (Score:5, Interesting)

    by Huntr (951770) on Sunday February 24, 2013 @04:51PM (#42997183)

    To the absolute surprise of no one.

    I think fraud is simply in Florida's DNA. I mean, what is Florida in the early to mid 20th century, if not "buying swampland for cheap?" Now, it's the height of US insurance fraud, medicare fraud, mortgage fraud, and identity theft, in addition to the drug smuggling and human trafficking that comes along with major ports of entry into the U.S. It's a crazy, crazy place and reality is far removed from the Mickey Mouse and orange juice that Discover Florida is selling.

    And before you blow me up, know that I say all this as a long-time Florida resident...

    • Re:Based in Florida (Score:5, Interesting)

      by Anubis IV (1279820) on Sunday February 24, 2013 @05:21PM (#42997383)

      You've identified one form of selection while missing the even more obvious one: Florida, south Florida in particular, is retirement central. As such, is it any surprise that Florida is a location where this sort of thing is happening, given that the elderly tend to be most susceptible to it and the elderly tend to migrate to Florida for retirement? That fact alone would account for the medicare fraud, mortgage fraud, and identity theft that you cited.

      • by Huntr (951770)

        That's definitely a factor. But, it's not like retired folks are the only victims, nor are they the only immigrants. I think it's also influenced by the large population living of poor people, people for whom English is a second language, and the fact that so many Floridians are simply from elsewhere and perhaps don't fully understand local rules and regulations.

        Forgot to mention the prescription drug fraud earlier, too. Oxycontin smuggling in to Appalachia is pretty much because of Florida and our foot-d

    • by Animats (122034)

      I think fraud is simply in Florida's DNA.

      South Florida, definitely. It's amazing how many scams come from South Florida. There are whole classes of fraud from there not seen much elsewhere. Timeshare-sales fraud [fbi.gov], phony DMV fraud, and phony tax-preparer fraud [forbes.com] are examples.

      In terms of dollar volume, though, lower Manhattan is way ahead. The South Floriday operators tend to be rather low rent.

    • by Nimey (114278)

      You forgot that Scientology has a major base in Florida.

    • by Jaysyn (203771)

      To the absolute surprise of no one.

      I think fraud is simply in Florida's DNA. I mean, what is Florida in the early to mid 20th century, if not "buying swampland for cheap?" Now, it's the height of US insurance fraud, medicare fraud, mortgage fraud, and identity theft, in addition to the drug smuggling and human trafficking that comes along with major ports of entry into the U.S. It's a crazy, crazy place and reality is far removed from the Mickey Mouse and orange juice that Discover Florida is selling.

      And before you blow me up, know that I say all this as a long-time Florida resident...

      We even have a convicted fraudster as Governor!

      (also lifelong FL resident)

  • Follow the wires (Score:5, Interesting)

    by PPH (736903) on Sunday February 24, 2013 @04:56PM (#42997225)

    but the investigator went to 1760 Sundance Drive, St. Cloud, which turned out to be a residence, and gave up.

    But the telco has to know where they are sending these calls. Either a landline, digital service or IP address. Either give it up to the authorities or become a co-defendant in the fraud case.

    You download one stinkin' Lady Gaga song and they can find you. Why not now?

    • Re:Follow the wires (Score:4, Informative)

      by Anonymous Coward on Sunday February 24, 2013 @05:56PM (#42997633)

      But the telco has to know where they are sending these calls. Either a landline, digital service or IP address. Either give it up to the authorities or become a co-defendant in the fraud case.

      The telcos make a killing with these kinds of customers, and wont do anything more than their corporate lawyer says they absolutely have to do not to be held accountable.

      And, if your telco (the one of the customer that gets called) sees the number 202-456-1111 coming in over an interconnection link, they simply cannot tell you where exactly the caller came from (assuming the white house does not make Robocalls), so basically they have to backtrace the whole chain, from interconnection to interconnection, and if just one telco in the chain does not cooperate or is outside the US, you're out of luck.

      The last resort would be ALL provider to have search for an OUTGOING call to the customers number to find the real caller. This is REAL work, because you are looking for a needle (the call) in a haystack, with tousands of haystacks (the telcos). And thats assuming, the call even originates inside the US.

      You download one stinkin' Lady Gaga song and they can find you. Why not now?

      Because a complete, working TCP connection is not spoofable. If you want the packet with the Lady Gaga song to reach you, you have to use your real IP adress. With the phone system, the callerid is worth about the same as a sender emailadress...

      • by PPH (736903)

        The telcos make a killing with these kinds of customers, and wont do anything more than their corporate lawyer says they absolutely have to do not to be held accountable.

        That's the root cause of the trouble right there. But then the telco CEOs aren't protected as members of the press, the clergy or the medical profession. So if a judge tells them to cough up a name and address and they refuse, they can just sit in a cell on a contempt of court charge while their corporate legal staff whines.

        And, if your telco (the one of the customer that gets called) sees the number 202-456-1111 coming in over an interconnection link, they simply cannot tell you where exactly the caller came from

        But my $4.99/min sex line charge seems to make it to the right place reliably. Strange how this happens.

        If the telcos are making said killing with these customers, they must know where

    • Their address is in the cloud! How do expect them to be traced?

  • Shameful (Score:2, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward

    It looks as though things in the US are the same as over here in little Britain: it's absolutely impossible to defraud people unless you provide a fake name and address.

    Wouldn't it be nice if at least one of the two countries could manage to pay somebody a living wage to actually check company registrations before they're allowed to trade at all, and at reasonably frequent but irregular intervals afterwards? Maybe between the two we could manage it? I think we've got about sixpence available from the taxpay

  • by david.emery (127135) on Sunday February 24, 2013 @05:02PM (#42997265)

    I sent my Senator (Mark Warner (D) Virginia), who sits on the relevant committee, a constituent request asking if anything ever happened as a result of filing "Do Not Call" violations. They sent me a Privacy Act form (so they could query the registry using my personal data.)

    And that was the end of it. I never heard back.

    On a related note, I think the FCC should make Caller ID both required and un-forgeable. (An individual could still choose to not have his Caller ID revealed, and that would be indicated on your Caller ID display.)

    • by MBCook (132727) <foobarsoft@foobarsoft.com> on Sunday February 24, 2013 @05:19PM (#42997369) Homepage

      The Do Not Call list works very well for what it was intended to do. It stops legal calls from businesses you have no association with. Do you remember the "would you like to change long distance providers" calls? What if Dish Network could call you every week to ask you if you wanted to switch off cable?

      The problem is that the DNC list does *nothing* to stop the following groups:

      • Political organizations - law doesn't apply
      • Charity solicitation - law doesn't apply
      • Surveys - law doesn't apply
      • Scams - they're already breaking the law

      Congress chose to allow the first 3 for their own benefit, and no law can stop the fourth, only really tough enforcement and holding phone companies accountable.

      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by CncRobot (2849261)

        What if Dish Network could call you every week to ask you if you wanted to switch off cable?

        I solved a similar situation, a long distance company kept calling me. One day I had some time to burn, sorry for them. Within 2 minutes the guy knew he wouldn't have a sale. 35 minutes into the call his supervisor came on to make sure everything was ok. I finally let him go at 50 minutes. Every time he attempted to hang up I asked "Are you hanging up on me?" which I guess is illegal according to the FCC. I believe I got put on a special list to never call again because aking to not be called by them

        • by Macgrrl (762836)

          I have a bigger problem with utilities sales staff at the front door. At the third time I have to say not interested in the conversation I actually roll out the old "What part of 'NO!' do you not understand?".

        • by macwhiz (134202)
          I had a better solution for long-distance sales calls for a while before Do Not Call. I worked for a telecom company. When the marketer would call and assure me that he could save me money and beat my current rates, I could truthfully reply "Well, I work for XYZ Telecom, and so I get free long distance. So how much are you willing to pay me to use your service?" This would reliably end the call...
    • On a related note, I think the FCC should make Caller ID both required and un-forgeable. (An individual could still choose to not have his Caller ID revealed, and that would be indicated on your Caller ID display.)

      Or just nix it, use ANI, and make sure that ANI data's sent for all calls.

  • I got 2 of these, both from a Washington state area code. Of course the caller ID could be fake...
  • by Anonymous Coward on Sunday February 24, 2013 @05:29PM (#42997431)

    There is a lot of money in violating the telemarketing rules. One illegal voice broadcaster was paid over $6 million by just one customer in only 10 months [1]. Large fines against violators are often uncollectible and ignored by scofflaws [2]. Violators often engage in money laundering and brag about their “bulletproof” broadcasting facilities that can’t be traced [3]. I personally received over 300 prerecorded telemarketing calls in some years, and I was able to track down the people behind only a tiny fraction of those calls, despite my concerted efforts in recording calls, filing lawsuits, subpoenaing phone company records, and hundreds of hours of my own time. Anyone who tries to find the source of these illegal calls will find the vast majority lead back to shadowy, untraceable names such as Transfers Argentina, Asia Pacific Telecom, TeleEurope, and Castle Rock Capital Management. Trying to track down a text message spammer is a similar exercise in futility.

            Many studies have show that massive penalties don't work as a deterrent because perpetrators never plan to get caught. What does work is increasing the likelihood of getting caught.

    [1] See declaration of Roberto C. Menjivar at 30 (totaling the amount paid to Voice Touch by National Auto Warranty during a 10 month period at $6,013,500). Document 42 in FTC v. Network Foundations, LLC., No. 1:09-cv-02929 (N.D. Ill. 2009).

    [2] See Order of Forfeiture, File No. EB-02-TC-120 (released Jan. 5, 2004) (finding Fax.com liable for the maximum fine of $11,000 for each of the 489 fax violations, for a total fine of $5,379,000).

    [3] Menjivar decl. at 20–22.

    • by Aardpig (622459)

      MFW slashdot post with references cited.

    • by Attila Dimedici (1036002) on Sunday February 24, 2013 @06:21PM (#42997823)
      I have found a way that gets me off of these lists. All of the automated calls, sooner or later, connect you to someone whose job it is to take down your information so that they can get your money. I always indicate that I am interested. Then when I start talking to someone, I ask questions indicating that I am interested but don't quite understand what they are offering. If I have time, I keep them on the line as long as possible before telling them I think they are the scum of the earth for being involved with such a scam. If I don't at least have time to talk to a real person, I don't answer the phone. It's interesting that after I talk to someone, it is month's before they call me again. A live person costs them money. They don't like it when you talk to a live person and don't "buy".
    • by mjwx (966435)

      Many studies have show that massive penalties don't work as a deterrent because perpetrators never plan to get caught.

      Financial penalties don't work.

      If you fine a driver for DUI, he pays the fine and keeps drink driving (in his mind, he doesn't even make the connection between drink driving and punishment. He'll call the fine "revenue raising"). If you take away his license or make him spend a few weeks in jail he now has a real incentive.

      Fraud has no such disincentive. Especially fraud perpetra

  • Supply-side fraud (Score:5, Insightful)

    by PopeRatzo (965947) on Sunday February 24, 2013 @05:47PM (#42997567) Homepage Journal

    All you dirty hippies who are calling for the heads of these "Second and Final Notice" folks must really hate free-market capitalism.

    These are the Job Creators, after all. And anything that's done to stop them is regulation, which is a dirty word.

    We need to just let the free market work and these problems will go away, right?

  • Blacklists work (Score:5, Informative)

    by zwede (1478355) on Sunday February 24, 2013 @06:03PM (#42997679)
    On Android: Create a contact (I call it "Spam"). Click settings->More and add to reject list. Whenever you get a spam call, select "update existing contact", select "Spam" and no more calls from that number. For a home phone, use a VOIP provider (I use and can recommend Galaxy Voice). They should have a web page that lets you add numbers to a blacklist. Also select the "anonymous call rejection" feature which will block all calls where the caller id has been intentionally blocked. By doing the above it is very rare for me to receive a spam call.
    • by EkriirkE (1075937)
      I use google voice for everything, I don't think anyone knows my real #. I created a contact "Telemarketers" (photo is of a pile of poo) that are marked as "Disconnected" whcih means anyone in that group gets the "doo-dahh-dee. I'm sorry, but the number you have dialled is no longer in service. Please hang up or dial your operator" announcement on loop.
    • by Greyfox (87712)
      I installed a whitelist app. If you're in my contacts, your call gets through. Otherwise, you go directly to voice mail. If it's important, I'll call back at my convenience. Most of the time, it's not.
  • by spaceyhackerlady (462530) on Sunday February 24, 2013 @06:07PM (#42997715)

    The sad thing is that there are enough people buying this shit to keep the robocallers and spammers in business.

    I routinely get robocalls wanting to reduce my credit card debt. A good trick, since I don't have any. I always wonder how the political polling people can possibly pretend their conclusions have any validity, since everybody hangs up on them.

    And so on. A medium that used to be useful has been poisoned by abuse.

    I view Do Not Call as intrinsically self-defeating. Like "opting out" of spam, it provides a list of known-good phone numbers. If the robocalls originate from offshore, there is little the local authorities can do about it anyway.

    ...laura

  • Where are the predator drones when you need them?
  • In order to track slimeballs easier, businesses should have a publicly listed Business ID Number and be required to use it in all print ads and provide it when requested over the phone.

  • I guess someone has already invented a captcha box to get rid of robocalls.

    Is there a problem using this kind of device?
    I can't remember but it seems to me that it has already been discussed here on slashdot, hasn't it?

    We don't have that kind of problems in my country, so I haven't looked for a solution like such.

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