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Transportation Technology

Plans Unveiled For Full Scale Replica of the Titanic 292

Posted by Soulskill
from the what-could-possibly-go-wrong dept.
Hugh Pickens writes "USA Today reports that Australian billionaire Clive Palmer has unveiled plans for construction of Titanic II, a cruise ship designed as a 'full-scale re-creation' of the Titanic, adding that the ship will be built in China and begin carrying passengers in 2016. The Titanic II will be built 883 feet long – 3 inches longer than the original Titanic – and weigh 55,800 gross tons, according to Palmer, who stopped short of calling the vessel unsinkable. It will carry a maximum of 2,435 passengers and 900 crew members, and include a gymnasium, Turkish baths, a squash court, a swimming pool, a theater and a casino. Like the original ship, there will no TVs aboard and probably no Internet service, Palmer says. Passengers will be able to dress in 1912-style clothing, giving them an opportunity to step back in time, or pretend they are Leo DiCaprio or Kate Winslet, who starred in James Cameron's 1997 blockbuster movie. But industry insiders are skeptical about the commercial viability of the ship. 'Titanic II is a curiosity and may have a draw as a floating hotel, but the idea of spending close to a week at sea on a vessel built around such a thin premise is seen as a stretch, at least by many within the industry,' says Michael Driscoll, editor of industry newsletter Cruise Week. Driscoll adds that he is skeptical about the future of Titanic II in the aftermath of the Carnival Triumph fire and last year's shipwreck of the Costa Concordia off the coast of Tuscany. Paul Kurzman, whose great-grandparents, Isidor and Ida Straus, died on the Titanic, says he has 'no problem' with the construction of Titanic II. 'I don't think they would have had any problem whatsoever, as long as the Titanic II steers clear of icebergs.'"
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Plans Unveiled For Full Scale Replica of the Titanic

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  • by matthewlw (1351307) on Wednesday February 27, 2013 @06:23AM (#43022693)
    I would have to wonder if they will effectively separate classes on a ship as they did in that time, this hardly seems like it would be a popular concept in modern day, however it is hardly an accurate recreation if they ignore this aspect.
    • by Joce640k (829181) on Wednesday February 27, 2013 @06:33AM (#43022733) Homepage

      Rose had plenty of fun in the the third class "Irish Jig" bar

      Plus it got her drunk/horny enough to grab Jack and do him in the back seat of a car so maybe it isn't all bad.

      The whole point of going on it is role playing so it should be a big hit in the orient even if whiny westerners don't think they can live a week without Facebook .

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by DNS-and-BIND (461968)
        The point is that she never would have been there...the movie was a work of FICTION. Imagine an elegant society woman going to a hoedown with the hillbillies to understand how ridiculous the concept is.
        • by Sasayaki (1096761)

          Makes me want to write a story about that.

        • A friend of ours who died a few years back was the son of a West Indian jazz musician and an upper-class British woman.

          His mother used to tell the story of how his father went to ask for her hand in marriage. This was early 1920s.

          Daddy: "So, er, how much exactly do you earn? Will you be able to keep my daughter properly?"
          WIJM: "About £65" (roughly an average annual income for a worker of the period)

          Daddy: "That isn't very much"
          Daughter: "That's a week, Daddy."
          Daddy: "Oh. Er...where were we thinki

    • by JaredOfEuropa (526365) on Wednesday February 27, 2013 @06:52AM (#43022801) Journal
      Perhaps passengers on this thing can get a taste of each. 2 days in 1st class, 2 days in 2nd and 2 days in 3rd. And 1 day shoveling coal into a furnace...
    • by gl4ss (559668)

      well exactly.

      nobody in their right mind would build an exact replica at this day and age. where the fuck would they find passengers for the lower decks??????? it's not like australia, usa or wherever this thing cruises to would be taking in passengers just wanting to transit from shore a to shore b.

    • by sg_oneill (159032) on Wednesday February 27, 2013 @07:11AM (#43022855)

      Clive Palmer is actually completely fecking bonkers. People here in australia treat him as sort of a scary/facinating madman who got all the dollars but none of the sense that one might associate with being a billionaire. Granted its not uncommon with australian billionaires to be a bit cranky (See rupert murdoch, gina rinehart, and so on).

      That said. I want someone to convince him to spend his billions on space travel. He's just far enough off his rocker to actually consider it.

      • ...convince him to spend his billions on space travel.

        Titanic 2... in SPAAAAACE! Lookout for that iceberg... err comet. In space, nobody can hear Rose blowing her whistle.

    • by Frankie70 (803801) on Wednesday February 27, 2013 @07:20AM (#43022885)

      What do you mean not a popular concept in modern day?

      Flights have cattle class, business class, first class etc don't they?

    • by CAIMLAS (41445)

      They're going to have to redesign the decks for the simple fact that the Titanic was not a cruise ship, it was a passage (aka passenger) ship. Cruise ships are going to have to have a lot more comfort and room available.

      That said, drinking, eating, and sitting around doing nothing are the primary activities on a cruise (I'd imagine). You can do that in any 'class' on the ship, conceivably. But I do imagine they'd improve berthing a bit for the 'general transport' class to more effectively use the space.

      Hone

      • They're going to have to redesign the decks for the simple fact that the Titanic was not a cruise ship, it was a passage (aka passenger) ship.

        It wasn't even a passenger ship - it was a passenger liner... designed to efficiently move as many people as possible on as tight a schedule as possible. (The term 'liner' refers to a line on a schedule.) The closest modern equivalent would be a high speed commuter train - shuttling back and forth along it's route on an infinite loop, and otherwise pretty much nothi

    • by sjwt (161428)

      Clive menchion something about that on the news tonight, and also stated that he would be staying in 3rd class for the maiden voyage.

  • by jonwil (467024) on Wednesday February 27, 2013 @06:26AM (#43022711)

    There are some parts of the old ship that most definitely should NOT be replicated on the new one.
    Like the lifeboats.
    And the engines.
    And the bridge (and its navigation equipment and iceburg detection systems)
    And the kitchens

    • by a_hanso (1891616) on Wednesday February 27, 2013 @06:31AM (#43022727) Journal

      There are some parts of the old ship that most definitely should NOT be replicated on the new one.
      Like the lifeboats.
      And the engines.
      And the bridge (and its navigation equipment and iceburg detection systems)
      And the kitchens

      And the iceberg itself. I don't think I'll be comfortable in a recreation of a scenario that ends in people freezing to death.

      • The iceberg itself is only a problem if the get a full scale model for that one as well... and hit it...
        Nevertheless I think that it would be a nice way to travel about for some folks, think of all the goths that are breaking their piggy-banks *right now* to have a cruise their way! :-)
      • by Zaatxe (939368) on Wednesday February 27, 2013 @07:24AM (#43022899)
        Don't worry, global warming took care of this one!
      • There are some parts of the old ship that most definitely should NOT be replicated on the new one.
        Like the lifeboats.
        And the engines.
        And the bridge (and its navigation equipment and iceburg detection systems)
        And the kitchens

        And the iceberg itself. I don't think I'll be comfortable in a recreation of a scenario that ends in people freezing to death.

        And don't forget the best one of all - a double-hull construction using brittle steel where water, once entered into one of the compartments can then pour over the top into the other compartments!

        Having an iceberg in the water doesn't make people freeze to death, though. Being in water cold enough that the icebergs are common, however...

        • by dbIII (701233)
          Since I've got a materials background I thought that as well, especially since I've spent a lot of time hitting little bits of steel that had been soaked in ice water with a huge hammer and seeing how brittle some are. There definitely is unsuitable steel for ships in the North Atlantic, as seen later when the Liberty ships used the cheapest steel available and repeated earlier mistakes. However after reading Joseph Conrad's newspaper article on the Titanic enquiry (thanks to Project Gutenburg), it's hard
    • by Joce640k (829181)

      There are some parts of the old ship that most definitely should NOT be replicated on the new one.
      Like the lifeboats.
      And the engines.
      And the bridge (and its navigation equipment and iceburg detection systems)
      And the kitchens

      What was wrong with the kitchens?

    • They will be; original link is crap; this one has slightly more information:

      http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2013/feb/26/titanic-2-launch-new-york-replica [guardian.co.uk]

      and of course...

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Titanic_2 [wikipedia.org]

    • by Millennium (2451)

      And the lack of adequate sealing in the lower compartments. It might actually have stayed afloat long enough for help to arrive if they'd been sealed at the top.

    • There are some parts of the old ship that most definitely should NOT be replicated on the new one. Like the lifeboats. And the engines. And the bridge (and its navigation equipment and iceburg detection systems) And the kitchens

      And the "watertight" compartments. IIRC, they only went up a couple of decks, so when the water level got high enough, they all flooded.

      • What makes you think modern cruise ships are any different? A hole in the bottom and the thing nearly capsized in shallow water. Many of those cruise ships cannot use the North Atlantic in winter.
    • by westlake (615356)

      There are some parts of the old ship that most definitely should NOT be replicated on the new one.

      Olympic, Titanic's twin sister, was in service for 24 years on the North Atlantic run.

      I don't see any problem with the engines.

      If your complaint is about the inefficacies of coal or the manning requirements and working conditions aboard a coal-fired ship, take it up with Winston Churchill. Naval innovation: From coal to oil [epmag.com]

      If you are First Lord of the Admiralty. you can make these things happen.

      I don't see any problems with the kitchens.

      Last Dinner On the Titanic: Menus and Recipes from the Great Liner, [amazon.com]

    • by MitchDev (2526834) on Wednesday February 27, 2013 @09:23AM (#43023395)

      Actually, load the the ship with the "top 1%" and sink the bitch fast, no lifeboats.

  • by u64 (1450711) on Wednesday February 27, 2013 @06:34AM (#43022737) Homepage

    What's next, Hindenburg replica?

    • by heypete (60671) <pete@heypete.com> on Wednesday February 27, 2013 @06:42AM (#43022771) Homepage

      What's next, Hindenburg replica?

      Why not? Traveling by airship would be a unique experience for many people.

      With proper precautions, hydrogen as a lifting gas is not considerably more hazardous than jet aircraft loaded with gobs of jet fuel /covering the fabric of the airship with highly flammable chemicals seems like a bad idea

      • Given what happened to the R101, travelling by airship could literally be a unique experience for the last lot of passengers. And indeed, their last ever experience.

        Face it, balloons either use an irreplaceable resource far too important to waste on vanity projects (helium), or they are insanely dangerous by modern standards.

        • From memory, the R101 disaster was caused by structural failures (in turn caused by poor design decisions in turn caused by political problems with the project.) R101 didn't catch fire until after it crashed. Had it been a plane with the same problems, the same thing would have happened, except there'd have been no survivors from a plane crashing into the ground at standard cruise speeds.

          Further I don't think one can reasonably travel across the Atlantic in a 747 pumped full of jet fuel, and then, on rea

          • Airships have to have light superstructures to be able to have adequate lift, and they have a very large surface area. To the best of my knowledge nobody has come up with a convincing way of safely landing (or taking off) an airship in high winds. Modern materials, good as they are, are still not sufficiently stronger than materials available in the 1930s to make a safe airship.

            I wasn't aware that hydrogen was corrosive.It can cause embrittlement of steels, but that is quite a separate issue.

            • by dbIII (701233)

              Modern materials, good as they are

              Some of the best aluminium bicycles and aircraft parts today are made from an alloy indistinguishable from the duralumin in some of the airships. Same composition, same heat treatment, same amount of work hardening, just a bit better quantified, better quality control and we now know why it has those properties instead of the trial and error that went into devising it.
              Hydrogen doesn't do anything that will cause problems with aluminium alloys.

            • by drinkypoo (153816)

              Modern materials, good as they are, are still not sufficiently stronger than materials available in the 1930s to make a safe airship.

              [citation needed]

    • I'd actually pay for a trip on that, though perhaps not if it'll use hydrogen as its lifting gas like the original.
      • I'd actually pay for a trip on that, though perhaps not if it'll use hydrogen as its lifting gas like the original.

        More recently it has been noted that the hydrogen gas was hardly the only major flammable thing about the Hindenberg.

      • by drinkypoo (153816)

        Using Hydrogen was the smartest thing about the Hindenburg. Using various ultraflammable components with the hydrogen was not a good idea.

    • by leuk_he (194174)

      build a replica of the new york WTC. What are the odds a place will fly into it twice?

    • by Virtucon (127420)

      Why Not? It's already being tried in Egypt. [reuters.com]

    • Why is it 3 inches longer?
  • Looney (Score:5, Informative)

    by hairyfish (1653411) on Wednesday February 27, 2013 @06:36AM (#43022747)
    For those outside Australia, Clive Palmer is well known looney tunes. He has a habit of making outlandish claims (such as the CIA is funding the Green (hippie) party purely to destabilise our coal industry), I'd be surprised if this ever sees the light of day.
    • Re:Looney (Score:5, Informative)

      by mad flyer (589291) on Wednesday February 27, 2013 @06:46AM (#43022787)

      And nobody tell the guys that the titanic had -from memory- at least one sistership who went on with her own commercial career without anykind of troubles...

      • Re:Looney (Score:5, Interesting)

        by Alioth (221270) <no@spam> on Wednesday February 27, 2013 @07:05AM (#43022849) Journal

        Almost any kind of troubles. The Olympic did crash into a British warship, the collision holing her both below and above the waterline, but no one was hurt in that one and neither the Olympic nor the warship sank.

        According to Wikipedia, one of the passengers on the Olympic when it crashed later was later on the Titanic when she sank (and survived that ordeal), and later was on the Britannic when it sank (surviving that one too).

        • Re:Looney (Score:4, Interesting)

          by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday February 27, 2013 @07:34AM (#43022933)

          According to Wikipedia, one of the passengers on the Olympic when it crashed later was later on the Titanic when she sank (and survived that ordeal), and later was on the Britannic when it sank (surviving that one too).

          Slightly luckier than the Tsutomu Yamaguchi who got hit by two nukes. (and survived that ordeal.)

        • by Ecuador (740021)

          According to Wikipedia, one of the passengers on the Olympic when it crashed later was later on the Titanic when she sank (and survived that ordeal), and later was on the Britannic when it sank (surviving that one too).

          Well, only the first time is really hard. Each subsequent shipwreck you are into, your accumulated experience makes it even easier to emerge unharmed while people drown left and right...
          Perhaps after a dozen or so shipwrecks you could even be fit enough to have a chance getting out of sinking u-boats...

        • Almost any kind of troubles. The Olympic did crash into a British warship, the collision holing her both below and above the waterline, but no one was hurt in that one and neither the Olympic nor the warship sank.

          That collision was shortly before the Titanic sailed. Over twenty years later towards the end of her career, Olympic had another collision. It collided with and sank the Nantucket lightship [wikipedia.org] with loss of life from the lightship.

        • And that passenger who was on all three ships when they crashed/sank, became a pro at handling ship sinkings:

          "She had also made sure to grab her toothbrush before leaving her cabin on the Britannic, saying later that it was the one thing she missed most immediately, following the sinking of the Titanic."

          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Violet_Jessop [wikipedia.org]
    • It would be more accurate to say he comes across as a Looney. Most of his controversy is carefully planned to generate some distraction in the media.

      What else give me hope that this is not a hoax is that most of his outlandish claims are only repeated once and then he disappears into the rather. This on the other hand is the fourth time in a year I've heard him talk about this idea.

    • That's what (the generic) you said when he first floated (pardon the pun) this idea a year or so back... looney tunes or not, he's making progress on his plans. (Granted it's a long way to to completion.)

  • So they built another ship called Titanic number 2,
    This time they thought they had a ship to sail the ocean blue,
    So they christened it with beer and she sunk right off the peer.

    It was sad when the great ship went down.
    To the bottoms of the sea.

    Uncles and ants many many lost the pants,
    It was sad when the great ship went down

  • by egcagrac0 (1410377) on Wednesday February 27, 2013 @06:37AM (#43022755)

    I'd prefer it to be called the Olympic - the one of the three that didn't sink.

    • I'd prefer it to be called the Olympic - the one of the three that didn't sink.

      In fairness to the Britannic it hit a mine which are designed specifically to snik ships, and almost everyone survived.

      Apparently one person survived the sinking of both ships and a near sinking of the third.

  • by DFJA (680282) on Wednesday February 27, 2013 @06:40AM (#43022761)
    I never knew the original Titanic didn't have internet access. I thought it was supposed to be a luxury ship!
    • by ccguy (1116865)

      I never knew the original Titanic didn't have internet access.

      It did, but being telegraph based the bandwidth was horrible, and with Hamming codes not having been invented yet transmission errors were a real issue.

    • In one of the ironies of history, the Titanic was equipped with wireless but the operator was too busy sending the important messages of the VIP travellers to make distress calls. It was the early 20th century equivalent of people making Facebook status updates "Ship is sinking, lol" rather than dialling 911.
  • Somewhere a millionaire supervillain is making a steerable iceberg!
  • What is the fascination with this silly, sunken Deathtrap?

    • by loufoque (1400831)

      Romantism.

    • One of the greatest European epics, the Chanson de Roland, is about a lost battle. Then there are the Greek tragedies. The Titanic story is a pure tragedy because the builders and the operators of the ship were brought low by hubris and by tempting Fate. That is why it has cultural resonance.
      • by MitchDev (2526834)

        Were they really? Were they actually bankrupted and scorned?

        I know in the modern area they'd have paid not a dime and their investors would be wiped out while they go off scot-free and continue to spend others money while hoarding their own.

  • Would you take a ride on Titanic 2?

    a) No!!!!!
    b) Oh yeah!!!!
    c) No, but I would pay for CowboyNeal's ticket

  • by Doalwa (610578) on Wednesday February 27, 2013 @07:17AM (#43022875)
    I was wondering when somebody would step up to the challenge and finally build a ship based on that wonderful movie from a few years back: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1640571/?ref_=fn_al_tt_9 [imdb.com]
  • The Titanic II will be built 883 feet long – 3 inches longer than the original Titanic

    At what temperature? A ship this big could not dilate more than 3 inches if the temperature increases?
    (I just thought this size difference detail might be pointless...)

  • says Michael Driscoll, editor of industry newsletter Cruise Week

    Yup, the name of someone else [wikipedia.org] whose boat journey could have gone better.

  • Why is it three inches longer?

    Like the original ship, there will no TVs aboard and probably no Internet service

    What, the original Titanic only probably had no internet service?

    • by dbIII (701233)
      Window dressing on the con.
      This guy became a millionaire by working MITM attacks on mining leases as a clerk in the Queensland Government department of mines, back when the government was so clearly on the take that around half of cabinet ended up in jail. He became a billionaire in a strange deal with BHP where he bought a Nickel refinery for far less than one years profit for that Nickel refinery - very strange since BHP was not in a situation where it needed to do a fire sale. Lately he's trying to sel
  • Passengers will be able to dress in 1912-style clothing, giving them an opportunity to step back in time [...]

    I am so glad they have given permission to dress as one sees fit. But, Mr Palmer and associates, if I want to dress in 1912-stlye clothing I'd do it with or without your permission, so please stay the fuck out of my personal life and dictation of how I should dress. Thank you. Am I allowed to abstain from shaving?

  • Disney's ships hold about 40% more passengers and they are priced at the higher end of the mass market lines. Given operational costs such as fuel are relative fixed it would seem their cruise costs would be significantly higher. The question is is the T2 experience compelling enough to attract capacity crowds and repeat business to be a viable long term business?
  • by ssam (2723487)

    will it take an HP lawsuit to keep it afloat?

  • What's that old saying, "A fool and his money are soon partying"?

  • I mean, if your goal is a meticulous re-creation, why the 3" difference?

    Did someone measure wrong and just shrug and say "whups, oh well, it's close"?

  • I'm going to sign up for a berth in Steerage Class; that looked a lot more entertaining than the upper decks (at least until things got wet).
  • by default luser (529332) on Wednesday February 27, 2013 @01:32PM (#43026185) Journal

    You know every fucking passenger will have to "experience" it, but there's only one prow on this ship, and more people there just ruins the experience.

    Maybe they'll use FastPass to reserve your place in line?

    "My love, I reserved the King of the World ride at 6pm, followed by a frolic in the back seat of an old clunker!"

    So romantic!

  • So, what do you think, slashdotters - should I start a kickstart for a project to build a self-moving, steerable iceberg?

                    mark "the ship sank; get over it"

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