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KDE Media Open Source Software Linux

Video Editor Kdenlive 0.9.6 Released 95

Posted by timothy
from the it's-hard-to-say-is-all dept.
jrepin writes "Version 0.9.6 of free and open source video editor Kdenlive has been announced. This version adds a Reverse clip option to Clip Jobs that creates a backwards clip.The list of audio/video bitrates can now be customized in custom rendering profiles. New release also fixes several bugs and crashes, including a very annoying bug that caused project files to seem corrupted."
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Video Editor Kdenlive 0.9.6 Released

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  • by Jagungal (36053) on Monday April 08, 2013 @05:14AM (#43389307)

    .. and didn't introduce new ones.

    Having used it in the past it was a very nice product but I did find it a bit frustrating at times with it's crashes and bugs right in the middle of a project.

    Might have to fire it up again and have a look.

    • by mabinogi (74033) on Monday April 08, 2013 @05:49AM (#43389423) Homepage

      It's pretty much the best open source video editor out there. It has the right mix of ease of use and functionality - they just need to work on the flakiness. Every now and then when I have need to do video editing, I've looked at the alternatives, and Kdenlive - crashes and all - is the only thing that ever actually does the job.

      The commercial Windows based editors may well work a lot better, but I'll never know, because I'll never use any of them.

      • by tyrione (134248)

        It's pretty much the best open source video editor out there. It has the right mix of ease of use and functionality - they just need to work on the flakiness. Every now and then when I have need to do video editing, I've looked at the alternatives, and Kdenlive - crashes and all - is the only thing that ever actually does the job.

        The commercial Windows based editors may well work a lot better, but I'll never know, because I'll never use any of them.

        That's not saying much seeing as any one with a brain and some cash working in video editing, compositing, etc., are embracing Final Cut Pro X, Avid and the others. They sure as hell won't touch this product until it's on par in it's like as Blender is for the 2.68 release.

        • by mug funky (910186)

          more cash than brain there. FCPx is the reason sales of Premiere went up so much.

          Avid is a little difficult to get started on, but is better for film. there'll always be a place for the offline/online split, because now all the computers can do HD in realtime in finished quality, people are starting to shoot in 4k, 5k, and up. Avid can deal with piddly low-res stuff and makes damn sure it matches the 4k 3D crazy high res stuff without causing the colourist several weeks of panicked conforming where the o

        • by Anonymous Coward

          Final Cut Pro X, are you serious?

      • by Lumpy (12016) on Monday April 08, 2013 @08:25AM (#43390013) Homepage

        You should try, because serious pro level stuff is not possible on linux yet. and I would gladly pay $500 for a linux video editor on par with even Sony Vegas 9. (They are currently at version 12)

        I would love to edit under linux, but I cant because I need to edit fast and have a stable editing suite. And that is ignoring that there is nothing like After effects or Motion for linux that exists.

        • I have been waiting a year and a bit, probably two, for this http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jEJcPKD9p7A [youtube.com]. Almost everything I have done in the last ten years has been on Avid systems, but I know that Lightworks is also "up there"... ask Scorsese.
        • Sony is beginning a push toward Mac software, and I don't see it taking an enormous leap for that to run on other linux-based systems.

          • There's a pretty big leap. All other issues aside, Linux does not have the robust media layer that Windows and MacOS do. Makes a port much more work to do and support.

            If MacOS was just an easy step to Linux, well then why isn't there more stuff? I mean take some pro audio and video software:

            Steinberg Nuendo: Windows and Mac.
            Avid Media Composer: Windows and Mac.
            Adobe Premier: Windows and Mac.
            Sony Vegas: Windows.
            Final Cut Pro: Mac.
            Steinberg Cubase: Windows and Mac.
            Digital Performer: Windows and Mac.
            Presonus S

            • by mug funky (910186)

              your point stands, but a lot of that works in wine, and cockos is working on a linux port of reaper.

            • by Anonymous Coward

              Is it really that big of a leap, or is it just perceived as one by the beancounters in charge? Do they even believe there exists a market?

              Even you, a frequenter of slashdot, sprout gibberish like "Linux does not have the robust media layer", which in context is complete nonsese. I give you that pulse-audio isn't all that great, but fuck, the audiostack in windows isn't exactly erm.. flawless either. In Linux you have alternatives like jack.

        • by mug funky (910186)

          nuke for motion graphics (or even digitalfusion).

          i think the autodesk editing programs run in linux. you'll be paying much more than $500 for smoke, combustion, etc though.

          at the lower end there's always lightworks, but you'll need to wait a bit while they get their shit together.

          premiere 6.5 may work in wine if you poke at it enough. cut in DV quicktime and you stand a chance. export EDL and conform in something else.

        • So I take that Pixar and Disney are not doing serious pro video editing on their Linux clusters...
          • by linuxpyro (680927)

            A lot of the visual effects companies tend to run Linux on workstations (except for things like Photoshop, obviously), as well as on the servers. Not sure what Pixar's using on their workstations, but either way 3D modeling and compositing are different beasts than editing.

            That said, there are a few commercial video editors that seem to support Linux; I found out about Mistika [wikipedia.org] on Wikipedia. I'm not sure how widely systems like that are used, though.

          • by Lumpy (12016)

            Nope. they do absolutely NO editing on linux. Their clusters are for 3d rendering only. raw footage is spooled off and sent to editing that is done on AVID.

      • by Anonymous Coward

        It's pretty much the best open source video editor out there. It has the right mix of ease of use and functionality - they just need to work on the flakiness.

        When i needed to edit some quick video and audio together, I found that a lot of the other offerings on Linux didn't have some simple functionality I wanted, or made it too obtuse and difficult to tweak. Kdenlive seemed to have everything I wanted, and was straightforward for me to pick up. Then there was the crashing. I could live with that, since it only took a few seconds to restart the program. But then a crash corrupted the save file and created a whole mess of things that meant starting over from

        • by Culture20 (968837)
          Always save to multiple save files. Never overwrite until done. Powerpoint, photoshop, kdenlive, doesn't matter what. If you've got a long term project, save it to a new file every day or hour. Only delete previous ones after confirming current ones, and usually save old ones anyway in case you want to backtrack or show a process to someone.
          • by Anonymous Coward

            Yeah, that is a great rule of thumb, but kdenlive seems to take it to a new level. I've never had Powerpoint corrupt a save file, although usually use it to make an hour long presentation once a month for several years now (I've messed things up myself before though... so still make a backup copy once a day). I've heard of complaints with Photoshop corrupting files, but I mainly use Inkscape and GIMP myself, and never had either of them corrupt files either. I still make backups once a day or when about

      • by tehcyder (746570)

        The commercial Windows based editors may well work a lot better, but I'll never know, because I'll never use any of them.

        Religious purity is far more important than common sense, eh?

        • by jedidiah (1196) on Monday April 08, 2013 @11:01AM (#43391461) Homepage

          Running an alien OS is a lot of bother.

          "Religious Purity" really has nothing to do with it.

          It's the same bother for a Linux user to dinker with Windows as it is for a Windows user to dinker with Linux. At least the copy of Linux is going to be free.

      • by deathguppie (768263) on Monday April 08, 2013 @09:53AM (#43390783)

        I love Kdenlive, and hate it sometimes too. It is by far the best editor on Linux as of now.. however the Lightworks beta is coming very soon. http://www.lwks.com/index.php?option=com_kunena&func=view&catid=19&id=42353&Itemid=81#42353 [lwks.com]

      • by amiga3D (567632)

        iMovie and Final Cut work pretty well and you never have to boot Windows to use them. I've used Kdenlive and it has a lot of promise but really it's beta software. I did manage to edit 2 hours of video without a crash though.

        • by Tapewolf (1639955)

          iMovie and Final Cut work pretty well and you never have to boot Windows to use them. I've used Kdenlive and it has a lot of promise but really it's beta software. I did manage to edit 2 hours of video without a crash though.

          I started out with iMovie, but it caused no end of problems for the project I was trying to do, essentially a slideshow with narration. I can't remember what the last straw was, but I switched over to Kdenlive on Linux and although it took a bit of getting used to and the crashes could be extremely frustrating, it worked a lot better for me than iMovie did on Snow Leopard.

          • by amiga3D (567632)

            I just did a huge video edit on my mac mini with iMovie last week. The newest iMovie works really well unlike the newest Final Cut. I'll probably use kdenlive again when I finish building a new system I'm putting together. Right now the mac mini with quad i7 and 16gigs of ram is just the ticket though. I notice memory usage while editing and it was running over 12 gigabytes being used. Ram and CPU horsepower makes a huge difference with video. The only thing I wish is that the mini could do dual displ

  • by inglorion_on_the_net (1965514) on Monday April 08, 2013 @06:17AM (#43389509) Homepage

    Question, while we're on the subject. I've recently been editing some video, and kdenlive was one of the few video editors I could get to work. However, I've found no way to use the parts of the original video that I haven't modified as they are, without re-encoding. Since most of what I've done is cutting out time ranges from the original footage, using the original data without re-encoding would save a lot of time and quality degradation. Is there any way to do this (using kdenlive or another FOSS video editor)?

    • Away from Linux (yes, I know!), I've just done a quick-n-dirty edit on two video clips and 15 photos, three separate soundtracks and various transitions in Nero 11. Yes, it was a royal pain in the arse to get the thing to keep the transitions (that was really the only thing that bothered me about the project), but eventually I ended up with a 720p stream (which is the same as the raw video format and some serious pulldown on the images, which are 14MP raw with minor cropping). I had to split the audio and v

    • by Anonymous Coward

      Not very userfriendly, but mplayer can snip movies in parts without re-encoding using an edl (edit decision list). You kan bind a specific key to 'cut here' and the watch the movie and press the key at the opportune moment. This wil generate the edl file, whcih you can then use to split the video in parts.

      It has been a while since I did this, but it used to work well.

    • by Anonymous Coward

      Avidemux will export a video without recompressing it. Just don't change the output format (leave as "copy") then you can make your cuts, and export, and it will export almost as fast as your computer can copy the file. (ie, for a full length movie about 1-2 minutes, with edits intact)

      The only caveate with this is that if you cut to close to a keyframe, often times the encoding lose information for the frame, and not exact play back correctly right at the cut, but this is a very minor thing. And if you stud

    • This seems a strange question. Perhaps I don't understand. You can import clips and re-use the clips anywhere in the time line. You can import the same clip more than once. Or just use snippets in different places. Some modern compression schemas are not necessarily linear. That is why they cannot be concatenated. So the idea of clipping them into sections without re-encoding is unrealistic.

      • Fair, but my input is Motion JPEG (I did not choose that). Seems to me that it should be possible to copy the frames that are unmodified and only generate new frames for the parts that have been modified (in my case, have filters applied to them).

        In fact, the same should be possible to some extent even with more advanced video formats. E.g. if you have I-frames and P-frames, the parts of the video that aren't modified should still be able to be copied, at least when input format and output format are the sa

    • by nekohayo (856257)

      Lossless cutting (provided that your output codecs match your input codecs) is a feature of the "GStreamer Editing Services" library and thus will be part of the next release of Pitivi (barring unforeseen bugs of course - usual disclaimer applies: no guarantee, patches welcome for issues that may arise, etc. :)

      Last time I tested (a year ago), this allowed rendering a project in 7 seconds instead of 5 minutes. Pretty cool if you don't need to apply any effects and just want to shuffle some cuts around quickl

    • Question, while we're on the subject. I've recently been editing some video, and kdenlive was one of the few video editors I could get to work. However, I've found no way to use the parts of the original video that I haven't modified as they are, without re-encoding. Since most of what I've done is cutting out time ranges from the original footage, using the original data without re-encoding would save a lot of time and quality degradation. Is there any way to do this (using kdenlive or another FOSS video e

  • LiVES 2.0.2 (Score:5, Interesting)

    by salsa man (2891241) on Monday April 08, 2013 @07:33AM (#43389761)
    And in other news, LiVES 2.0.2 [sourceforge.net] was released yesterday.
    • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

      by Anonymous Coward

      I've never seen this one before.

      Whats the background?
      Which came first LiVES or KDEnlive?
      Which is superior at this time?

  • by Lumpy (12016) on Monday April 08, 2013 @08:22AM (#43389991) Homepage

    AVCHD files yet without trans-coding them?

    Looks like nope... So it is useless for 90% of the camcorders out there unless you spend a few hours transcoding and losing detail.

    • by Salsaman (141471)

      LiVES [sourceforge.net] supports it, so you could always use that instead.

      • by Anonymous Coward

        I'm confused. Why are there two salsamen, both with comments about LiVES? Did you forget/remember your password over the last 1:30?

    • Different camcorders use different types of AVCHD. For a complete list of supported AVCHD formats look here [kdenlive.org]

  • by Anonymous Coward

    Unfortunately the "title" feature is still in its infancy:

    It's impossible to give titles "momentum" (for kinetic texts, etc). And the devs acknowledged this is a fundamental design flaw that it'd be difficult to change now.

    There aren't many templates to choose either.
    A friend of mine told me that with a Mac making a title is only a matter of choosing a template from a list. You can make a title with a growing flower around it, etc.
    So not only it needs to advance in the technical department, but on the artis

  • by Rambo Tribble (1273454) on Monday April 08, 2013 @09:28AM (#43390505)
    Kdenlive has the potential to be one of the best NLEs out there, but bugs have held it back. It sure would be nice to see the problems kleaned up.
  • Openshot Kickstarter (Score:5, Informative)

    by Anand Radhakrishnan (2891361) on Monday April 08, 2013 @09:58AM (#43390821)
    http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/421164014/openshot-video-editor-for-windows-mac-and-linux [kickstarter.com] - Contribute generously and spread the word pls. A good video editor has been long due on Linux!
    • by Anonymous Coward

      It already runs on Linux; that Kickstarter is funding a port to Mac OS X and Windows.

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