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How Netflix Eats the Internet 303

Posted by timothy
from the my-what-big-eyes-you-have dept.
pacopico writes "Every night, Netflix accounts for about one-third of the downstream Internet traffic in North America, dwarfing all of its major rivals combined. Bloomberg Businessweek has a story detailing the computer science behind the streaming site. It digs into Netflix's heavy use of AWS and its open-source tools like Chaos Kong and Asgard, which the Obama administration apparently used during the campaign. Story seems to suggest that the TV networks will have an awful time mimicking what Netflix has done."
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How Netflix Eats the Internet

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  • by MatrixCubed (583402) on Thursday May 09, 2013 @02:49PM (#43677941) Homepage
    Of course. The internet (not unlike everything else) tastes like chicken.
  • by MightyYar (622222) on Thursday May 09, 2013 @02:53PM (#43677987)

    He learned that from the British. [wikipedia.org]

  • by Anonymous Coward on Thursday May 09, 2013 @03:04PM (#43678141)

    mediahint.com

  • Re:Is Netflix (Score:4, Informative)

    by hoxford (94613) on Thursday May 09, 2013 @03:05PM (#43678159)

    Just like Akamai and others were doing 13 years ago...

  • I pay for Netflix, Hulu Plus, Amazon Prime, NHL Center Ice

    What do you do for NHL games that are blacked out of NHL Center Ice because they are shown on national or regional cable television? Last year the freaking finals were shown on what is now NBC Sports Network, a cable channel.

  • Re:Is Netflix (Score:4, Informative)

    by postbigbang (761081) on Thursday May 09, 2013 @03:18PM (#43678255)

    Which is why distributing through AWS also makes sense. Tumblr and others do the same thing. It's called: most efficient CDN you can construct. And with luck, it will eat Comcast/xFinity's lunch, along with a long list of broadband cable provider's meals. Yes, you still need the last mile. No, you don't need the goofy TV signal infrastructure at 720p on a good day. Free your cable: use all of the bandwidth for packets.

  • by Digicrat (973598) on Thursday May 09, 2013 @03:20PM (#43678283)

    I love how the cable companies (ie:Comcast) can call me up offering me a Cable/Internet package for $70/month, only $5 more than what I nominally pay for Internet only ... but flat out refuse to tell me what the actual cost would be after taxes/fees (I was literally told that I should sign up and can cancel it after the first month if I don't like what the taxes are). I'd gladly pay an extra $5-10/mo for full cable TV access ... but in reality it's more like 20-40 after taxes and fees (which largely don't apply to Internet-only service). /rant

    And those are additional reasons why Netflix+Antenna+MythTV > Cable TV

  • Re:Is Netflix (Score:3, Informative)

    by ArhcAngel (247594) on Thursday May 09, 2013 @03:25PM (#43678339)

    imagine Microsoft started going around to every business running Windows/Exchange, saying, "Hey, we deserve some of your profits. You're using our products to make money, and it's totally unfair that we don't get a cut." That'd be ridiculous,right? Microsoft offered a product, and you bought it according to their terms. If you think they deserve a percentage simply because you use their product to make money, then where does it end? Why can't 3M come after you for a percentage because you use post-its.

    Well they did do something analogous to this when they were doing site licensing. I don't know if they still get away with the practice but at one time they charged a per desktop license fee. Not a per installed copy mind you...they quite literally charged per machine on the premises and it did not matter if it was running a MS product or not. If the entire marketing dept. was using Macs they still got charged for a Windows license for every Mac. Engineering group all running on Sun Sparc? doesn't matter they all get charged a license.

  • Re:Is Netflix (Score:5, Informative)

    by SeaFox (739806) on Thursday May 09, 2013 @03:52PM (#43678619)

    ISPs only have so much capacity to sell though.

    Yes, and like any product when demand exceeds supply you would then invest in your company to increase your ability to fulfill it. It's called "business is going well -- we're expanding".

  • Re:Is Netflix (Score:5, Informative)

    by SeaFox (739806) on Thursday May 09, 2013 @04:02PM (#43678711)

    imagine Microsoft started going around to every business running Windows/Exchange, saying, "Hey, we deserve some of your profits. You're using our products to make money, and it's totally unfair that we don't get a cut." That'd be ridiculous,right? Microsoft offered a product, and you bought it according to their terms. If you think they deserve a percentage simply because you use their product to make money, then where does it end? Why can't 3M come after you for a percentage because you use post-its.

    Well they did do something analogous to this when they were doing site licensing. I don't know if they still get away with the practice but at one time they charged a per desktop license fee. Not a per installed copy mind you...they quite literally charged per machine on the premises and it did not matter if it was running a MS product or not.

    That's not the same as it only references in-business usage. This would be like Microsoft asking for a percentage of quarterly revenue from your company simply because everyone is using Outlook/Exchange justifying it as the email service helped facilitate business.

    Or how about the Ford company asking a taxi fleet for a cut of the per-mile rate because the vehicles are all Ford made, ignoring that the vehicles were all purchased paid in full by the company already.

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