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GUI GNOME Red Hat Software Linux

Red Hat Confirms GNOME Classic Mode For RHEL 7 192

Posted by timothy
from the diplomatic-tightrope dept.
An anonymous reader writes "The H-Online is reporting that the upcoming RHEL 7 will use GNOME Classic Mode over Gnome Shell as its Default Desktop GUI. Speaking to TechTarget ahead of the 2013 Red Hat Summit, Red Hat engineering director Denise Dumas said this regarding the decision: "I think it's been hard for the Gnome guys, because they really, really love modern mode, because that's where their hearts are." She added that the same team had "done a great job putting together classic mode" and that it was eventually decided to use it in favour of the more radical modern interface to spare customers the effort of relearning their way around the desktop again."
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Red Hat Confirms GNOME Classic Mode For RHEL 7

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  • Re:Fonts (Score:5, Funny)

    by Sarten-X (1102295) on Thursday June 13, 2013 @10:49AM (#43995765) Homepage

    The straight lines are straight, and lines on different letters have different apparent thickness.The kerning's a little distinctive as well, making the letters each look a little different. All together, this means that after a few minutes of reading text, your eyes will still be able to read the text! This encourages a computer user to actually use their computer, resulting in a higher risk for repetitive-strain injuries like Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

    In contrast, consider the Segoe font Microsoft has chosen for Windows 8 and Office 2013. Its lines are curved, its corners indistinct, and every letter looks identical apart from its shape. The pristine perfection of each glyph allows the brain to properly tangle the shapes together, interrupting the reading process. In my own experience, I've found that after only a few minutes of reading labels in the course of my work, the discomfort in reading is a subtle reminder to get up and look away from the computer for a few more minutes.

    From the many interruptions, I'm sure my health has improved, and the total effect on my productivity has been quite noticeable.

The meat is rotten, but the booze is holding out. Computer translation of "The spirit is willing, but the flesh is weak."

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