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Google Now Serves 25% of North American Internet Traffic 84

Posted by samzenpus
from the bow-to-the-google dept.
sturgeon writes "Wired Magazine claims today that Google is now 25% of the North American traffic with a mostly unreported (and rapidly expanding), massive deployment of edge caching servers in almost every Internet provider around the world. Whether users are directly using a Google service (i.e. search, YouTube) or the devices are automatically sending data (e.g. Google Analytics, updates), the majority of end devices around the world will now send traffic to Google server during the course of an average day. It looks like Wired based their story on a report from cloud analytics and network management company DeepField."
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Google Now Serves 25% of North American Internet Traffic

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  • by Anonymous Coward

    That headline is confusing, considering there is a service called Google Now which is known not for its data consumption but its heavy battery draining capabilities.

  • by andy_from_nc (472347) on Monday July 22, 2013 @12:08PM (#44351677)

    All of the world's traffic is sent through an NSA server during the course of an average day.

    • Not necessarily so.

      And worse, the test methodology linked from the post is based on a three-year-old sketchy (and perhaps wheezing vacuum cleaner) and doesn't point to validation as a cumulative measurement. In other words, a bit suspect.

    • by yusing (216625)

      Google, NSA, what's the difference?

  • The NSA Now Spies on 25% of North American Internet Traffic
    Lol, jk, it's more.
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by jeffmeden (135043)

      The NSA Now Spies on 25% of North American Internet Traffic

      Lol, jk, it's more.

      You have that backward, headline _should_ read "NSA now has ready access to 25% of North American internet traffic without even needing their own servers"

      or maybe "Another win for the cloud"?

  • by bogaboga (793279) on Monday July 22, 2013 @12:10PM (#44351713)

    Google is now 25% of the North American traffic...

    I have never been a CEO, an probably will never be, but what I wanted to know is what exactly goes on in a CEO's mind (say Steve Ballmer), once a statistic/detail like this is outed.

    What really goes on in a mind like his?

    • by Anonymous Coward

      Google is now 25% of the North American traffic...

      I have never been a CEO, an probably will never be, but what I wanted to know is what exactly goes on in a CEO's mind (say Steve Ballmer), once a statistic/detail like this is outed.

      What really goes on in a mind like his?

      Better not to ask what goes through Steve Ballmer's mind, but what the _chair_ goes through that Steve Ballmer is going to throw...

      • If the last five years of Ballmer are anything to go by, he doesn't actually want Microsoft to succeed. So, he's probably pleased to hear how badly he's doing. But what I don't understand is: why? Why is Microsoft deciding to jump on the cloud/tablet bandwagon and turn itself from leader into second rate Apple+Google copycat? What does he stand to gain? Maybe he's bored and has made enough money as a winner, and now he just wants to dick about with this huge plaything he's inherited from Bill. Isn't that a
    • by quonsar (61695)
      DEVELOPERS! DEVELOPERS! DEVELOPERS! Filter error: Don't use so many caps. It's like YELLING. Exactly my point.
    • what exactly goes on in a CEO's mind (say Steve Ballmer)

      Probably "I need a chair"

    • by jaseuk (217780)

      Probably relief that your not having to pay for all the infrastructure and transit to host Youtube. 20%+ of that traffic is probably Youtube.

      I'm sure Microsoft have 5% of NA traffic in Windows updates?

      Jason.

    • >>I have never been a CEO, an probably will never be, but what I wanted to know is what exactly goes on in a CEO's mind (say Steve Ballmer), once a statistic/detail like this is outed.
      >> What really goes on in a mind like his?

      The same thing you're thinking... "I'll never be a normal consumer, but I just want to know... what exactly goes on in a normal consumer's mind once a detail like this is outed"

  • Don't forget CDN (Score:5, Insightful)

    by trifish (826353) on Monday July 22, 2013 @12:15PM (#44351785)

    CDN (Content Distribution Networks) are even more "God-like". They serve most traffic for the biggest players, like Microsoft.

    The stats, metadata, and content must be quite interesting.

    • by gmuslera (3436)
      Don't forget p2p neither, that should be a big percent of all internet traffic. And CDN serves mostly static content, the same for a lot of people, is more interesting the metadata of personalized, dynamic content.
  • Obviously Youtube (Score:5, Insightful)

    by darkshot117 (1288328) on Monday July 22, 2013 @12:18PM (#44351807)

    Since they are including Youtube as part of this traffic, I can see why it would be such a high percentage. Nearly every other Google service is pretty low bandwidth, but many people, including myself, now use Youtube as a replacement for TV. So I'm not suprised by this statistic at all.

    • Ditto. YouTube (and areena.yle.fi (clips from Finnish national free-to-air TV)) have completely replaced my TV watching. Digging past the cat videos you can find way more interesting stuff from YouTube than from the traditional tube.
  • A relatively small local ISP has 2-3 google devices in their DCs, so that doesn't surprise me Went to do some traceroutes and noticed they were serving all my google traffic to me. Turns out it's at google's request
    • by Bengie (1121981)
      Not my ISP. My trace routes always to to Chicago. 1ms pings to Google would be kind of cool.
  • by sammy baby (14909) on Monday July 22, 2013 @12:27PM (#44351905) Journal

    Just to be clear: the title of this story should be interpreted "The combined traffic of Google's internet properties now account for 25% of all Internet traffic in North America."

    Not, as I thought upon my first reading, "Google's mobile device software package, "Google Now [google.com]", accounts for 25% of all Internet traffic in North America." That made me do a spit-take.

  • Fact. (Score:4, Insightful)

    by girlintraining (1395911) on Monday July 22, 2013 @12:38PM (#44352025)

    Trying to block out google analytics using various add-ons has been an enlightening experience to say the least. The majority of websites out there have links to third party tracking sites, google analytics figuring highly among them. Trying to exist on the internet without revealing some aspect of one's identity, even for the most mundane thing -- a search for information, is becoming very difficult.

    Even here on Slashdot, they've blocked Tor. Amusing -- they let anyone post "anonymously", and unless of course you actually try to post anonymously you might believe it. If a website that caters to those most likely to understand privacy on the internet can't get it right...

    • On the upside, Google Analytics still comes from its own domain which has an obvious name, so it's easy to block and then continue with the target page. Some places will pull javascript from a dozen domains named with just random strings.

  • I don't get it...

    Youtube is pretty light on full-length movies and TV episodes, and it's still not extremely common that their videos are available in high definition.

    Netflix and Hulu both have much more multi-hour content, higher-quality content that more people are likely to want to watch, and they have most of it in highdef, eating up the pipes. I've ever considered Hulu as a free, viable replacement for live TV, now that their offerings are so extensive, and even includes nightly news programs (only gl

    • by ZFox (860519)

      and it's still not extremely common that their videos are available in high definition.

      I find this to be exactly opposite, now. Maybe not for the Top 10 Boobs in Video Games videos or anything relatively old, but I find that every single regularly uploading Youtube Channel now offers at the very least 720p.

      I think that mobile devices help them to gain that #1 spot (I would imagine more people watch 4 minute videos on their phones than full length movies and shows). Also think about videos that have gone viral that everybody has to see. Also think about the number of sites that embed You

    • by dgatwood (11270)

      I find it very hard to believe that Youtube is so massively beating out all the higher quality video providers, and can only conclude that the data is massively flawed, as TFA starts suggesting about half-way through.

      Or, more likely, that people are simply no longer willing to pay money for content. With the exception of Hulu, most of those higher-quality providers charge a monthly fee. Also, most online video content, statistically, is viewed by younger people, who tend to have shorter attention spans on

    • by FlynnMP3 (33498)

      The article said that Google services is on the average is 25% of NA traffic. During prime time hours for obvious reasons and the early morning hours where Netflix and Hulu update their cache servers, the majority of traffic is those 2 sites. That's very believable.

    • by mattack2 (1165421)

      I hope you realize you can watch at least some of the PBS shows you mention at pbs.org. At least *many* episodes of Nova & Frontline.

      Also, Frontline is available as an audio podcast, and, as a news program, IMHO I can get most of the useful info out of it just by listening to it (at 2x like I do most podcasts).

      • by evilviper (135110)

        It would be infinitely more convenient if I could just add them to my hulu queue and go. Videos scattered all over the web are a no go for a multimedia PC. HuluDesktop, meanwhile, works pretty well, despite the bugs

        • by mattack2 (1165421)

          But you'd have ads on your hulu queue. I don't believe there are any ads (ignoring the 'funding by' part on PBS which is technically an ad but usually very short and not the same type of ads you see elsewhere) on the pbs showings.

          • by evilviper (135110)

            Ads won't kill me. In fact I'd like to see PBS get a little extra funding out of the deal.

  • ... is porn.

  • Please Google, don't screw us. We have put our faith and internet traffic into you. We have rested our emails, the contents of our cell phones, our family photos, and favorite restaurants with you. Please don't be a d&^k and do anything stupid like turn into a giant conglomerate who controls all of Earth's resources and keeps them for only the super wealthy, while the poor are confined to a desolate existence - or something like that I have seen in the Science Fiction movies.
  • Parsing please.......

    Is this "Google Now" serving 25%......or "Google" now serving 25%.

  • I think you mean WWW ...

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