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Tumblr Follows Instagram - Reveals Plan For More Ads 75

Posted by Unknown Lamer
from the share-this-tired-memevertisement dept.
cagraham writes "Following close on the heels of Instagram's advertising announcement last week, Tumblr has signed an agreement with analytics firm DataSift to provide info to advertisers on user behavior. According to Yahoo! CEO Marissa Mayer, who oversaw the recent $1.1 billion purchase of Tumblr, advertising on the site will become increasingly prevalent throughout 2014. DataSift will provide advertisers with info on the 5.5 billion interactions that occur on the site each day. This makes Tumblr the latest in a slew of recent tech companies to turn towards targeted ads in an attempt to generate revenue." Twitter is another customer of DataSift.
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Tumblr Follows Instagram - Reveals Plan For More Ads

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  • by Anonymous Coward

    I'm too old to care about tumblr or Instagram... Or what people share on them.
    And I don't get why people find it interesting?

    Now get of my lawn. :D

    • Re:Sigh (Score:5, Insightful)

      by plover (150551) on Monday September 16, 2013 @07:35PM (#44868095) Homepage Journal

      And nothing of value was corrupted.

    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward

      Texting replaced email because texting is much more transient in nature and the younger crowd have the attention span of a goldfish.

      Instagram is 'texting' for image sharing. I can't remember the name of the 6 second video clip platform that's popular right now, but it's very transient in nature too.

      Facebook is so "permanent" and these youngin's don't want to remember what they did last week let along see their entire timeline.

      Of course this whole "done and gone" mentality does not bode well for things in 10

  • by pseudofrog (570061) on Monday September 16, 2013 @07:31PM (#44868065)
    my feels! i can't...
    • Does this mean we'll start seeing something semi-worthwhile on Radar rather than what American Apparel mistakenly thinks kids should buy or the latest flash-in-the-pan Fox TV drama?

  • by JoeyRox (2711699) on Monday September 16, 2013 @07:40PM (#44868123)
    The plan is to use it less. So let's call it a wash.
    • by Great Big Bird (1751616) on Monday September 16, 2013 @07:55PM (#44868241)
      There are many things about tumblr that are nice from the interface that is ideal way to present those things. But the ads will kill it. Somebody will reproduce it if it is that good, or forget it if alternatives come.
    • Aw, but now where am I going to go for porn?

      Oh, right, the rest of the internet. Never mind.
    • by AmiMoJo (196126) *

      Just install AdBlock and the usual privacy enhancing add-ons for your browser.

      I wonder if they try to detect the number of users blocking ads and factor it into their decision to increase advertising or not.

  • the irony (Score:5, Interesting)

    by themushroom (197365) on Monday September 16, 2013 @07:42PM (#44868135) Homepage

    Yahoo getting targetted ads on Tumblr to find out what its users want... then ignoring when users on Flickr try to tell Yahoo what they want.

  • by swillden (191260) <shawn-ds@willden.org> on Monday September 16, 2013 @08:00PM (#44868275) Homepage Journal

    I really, really dislike that model for targeted advertising, and I'm surprised Mayer would sign up for it, rather than using the Google model of keeping the data in house and doing the targeting themselves, so that advertisers never see it. At least that way you only have to keep your eye on one possible misuser of your data (well, plus government agencies who decide to target you for their user data requests).

    I suppose making effective use of the data yourself is a lot harder than selling it. But, as I understand it, Google's ability to use the data more effectively than advertisers themselves would is a big part of Google's success. I guess Mayer doesn't think Yahoo! has the know-how to do it as well.

    (Disclaimer: I work for Google, which may bias me here. I don't think it does, because I felt the same way before I started working for Google, but it's possible.)

    • by Anonymous Coward

      Yahoo hasn't done anything well in house for a while now and that's essentially the nucleus of its dysfunction.

      Google does a lot of good work in house and the sad thing is that Marissa Mayer isn't showing any signs of bringing that over to Yahoo. So far her management has shown signs of being superficial. As CEOs go, superficial management is about par. You can do worse, but Yahoo needs better than average to come out of its malaise.

      • Well the superficial changes she's made so far makes Yahoo more and more like Google that I'm beginning to think Mayer is Google's equivalent of Stephen Elop. She's not exactly running Yahoo to the ground the way Elop did but then again Google tend to have more finesse than Microsoft's embrace and extinguish approach to the competition. Google's fine with coop-tition so long as you don't threaten their bread-and-butter ad-nalytics business. So there you have Google happily funding Mozilla's yearly operation

    • by 0ld_d0g (923931)

      Google model of keeping the data in house and doing the targeting themselves

      FYI: You guys share Google Analytics data with "others" (Whoever pays Google I guess) after supposedly anonymizing it. I wonder how many people are actually aware of it. https://support.google.com/analytics/answer/1011397?hl=en [google.com]

      • by swillden (191260)
        Yes, aggregated, anonymized trend data is sold. It's a minor, but not trivial, revenue source for Google. I don't think that's what DataSift is doing though. They appear to be selling individual user information.
        • by 0ld_d0g (923931)

          Yes, aggregated, anonymized trend data is sold. It's a minor, but not trivial, revenue source for Google.

          Well I don't really know about other divisions. I just happened to run into this because I setup a google adwords account recently for our company and managed to catch this setting and turn it off. More importantly, the terms of service allows google to sell any data to anyone.

          For e.g.

          ----------------
          Your TOS states:

          "When you upload or otherwise submit content to our Services, you give Google (and those we work with) a worldwide license to use, host, store, reproduce, modify, create derivative works (such a

          • by swillden (191260)

            And your privacy policy states:

            We do not share personal information with companies, organizations and individuals outside of Google unless one of the following circumstances apply:

            We provide personal information to our affiliates or other trusted businesses or persons to process it for us, based on our instructions and in compliance with our Privacy Policy and any other appropriate confidentiality and security measures.

            We may share aggregated, non-personally identifiable information publicly and with our partners – like publishers, advertisers or connected sites. For example, we may share information publicly to show trends about the general use of our services. ----------------

            Not exactly comforting.

            No? Perhaps we have different standards of comfort, but it seems pretty good to me. The first clause says that Google may outsource data processing, but that whoever they outsource to must follow the same rules as Google. The second says Google will only sell aggregated, anonymized data.

            When things are going good user privacy is important from a PR perspective but when things go bad and wall street/investors/other idiot MBA types turn on the pressure, most companies fold and will sell out to make money.

            Well, at least as long as Page, Brin and Schmidt are in charge, Wall Street and other MBAs don't have much say. Those three outvote the rest of the shareholders combined. And Google is pretty light on MBAs in general, especi

            • by 0ld_d0g (923931)

              No? Perhaps we have different standards of comfort, but it seems pretty good to me. The first clause says that Google may outsource data processing, but that whoever they outsource to must follow the same rules as Google. The second says Google will only sell aggregated, anonymized data.

              I wanted to contrast the language difference between TOS and Privacy Policy. A TOS is something "I Agree" to whereas a Privacy Policy is just something Google tells me it might or might not do with my data. A huge difference. It is evident in the language too, TOS allows Google to sell personally identifiable data, while privacy policy states they wont. Privacy Policies are not legally binding - so its merely a PR thing. TOS gives Google rights - for e.g. to kick a user out of their service whenever they w

              • by swillden (191260)

                Privacy Policies are not legally binding - so its merely a PR thing. TOS gives Google rights - for e.g. to kick a user out of their service whenever they want - without giving the *user* any rights - other than what the privacy policy states they might do.

                I think privacy policies are more meaningful than you imply. I believe they create promissory estoppel.

                Well, nothing stops individual employees from leaking/spying on data anyway. And it has happened .. at Google [wired.com]/Facebook [digitaljournal.com]/etc, so all the security in the world will only stop external script-kiddies and other low-level information hackers but cant stop anyone who is motivated enough.

                Actually, there is a lot that stops individual employees from leaking/spying. The article you mentioned was three years old, and it described things that happened earlier. There is a lot of infrastructure in place today to prevent unauthorized employee access that wasn't there 3-4 years ago. I happen to know that very well, because I design and build a lot of it -- and 95% of all of my effort is devoted to

                • by 0ld_d0g (923931)

                  I think we've gotten fairly off-topic here so I'll just let this be my last response.
                  --

                  I think privacy policies are more meaningful than you imply. I believe they create promissory estoppel.

                  Its never been tested so we'll never know. Besides, the point is moot since nobody can expect an average user to sue giant corporations - given their army of lawyers.

                  Google has a really excellent security story, and I think we should be telling it. But since we aren't all I can say is: It's awesome, trust me :-)

                  Okay. I'll take that at face value.

                  We disagree on the need for an explicit opt-in, and I do think that Google's business model is a reasonable one, and one that's good for users.

                  When I type google.com into a browser, I am not expressing any intent for Google to track me. Google is simply assuming that the fact that any packets are routed through their networks gives them the right to inspect and tra

                  • by swillden (191260)

                    Besides, the point is moot since nobody can expect an average user to sue giant corporations - given their army of lawyers.

                    Class action. Or, alternatively, legislative action. Google is fully cognizant of both of those possibilities, and that at Google's size and public visibility one or both would happen.

                    When I type google.com into a browser, I am not expressing any intent for Google to track me.

                    Intent, no, permission yes.

                    Google is simply assuming that the fact that any packets are routed through their networks gives them the right to inspect and track/save them.

                    Do your packets get routed through Google's network? Not unless you're on Google Fiber, and if you are Google doesn't assume any such right.

                    But you're not talking about packets which you're sending somewhere else which happen to flow through Google, you're talking about packets that you send to Goo

  • It still makes me wonder: how come Google ads just don't irritate me*, and even actually interest me enough to click though on regular basis, but Facebook, Flickr, and everyone else seem to handle advertising in ways that just plain irritate me?

    Or that apparently waste advertisers' money because they're flinging ads at people who have utterly no interest in them.

    Kind of the same way that I can drop back into Amazon.com after a year or so, and it just feels good and somehow makes it really easy to buy
  • Metastatic snooping (Score:5, Informative)

    by Ol Olsoc (1175323) on Monday September 16, 2013 @08:34PM (#44868535)
    If it were just Tumbler, or Twitter, or Facebook or Google following their users, that might be at least people going there and knowing their every click was being monitored.

    Here's a little experiment. Y'all do have NoScript running right? rIght? Reset it to defaults. Prepare for an onslaught.

    Yahoo home page:

    go.com, fwmrm.net, facebook.net,media.net,sitescout.com, yieldmanager.com, interclick.com, yldmgirng.net .

    Now I thought Yahoo was bad - but wait, there's more

    Did a web search on "New York Times" on yahoo went to their site their site....

    adsafeprotected.com, googlesyndication.com, nyt.com, moatads.com, serving-sys.com, nytimes.com

    Now on the same page, I'll temporarily allow all those. Now we have more friends running scripts on the same page:

    Facebook.net, chartbeat.com, revsci.net, krxd.net, scorecardresearch.com, brightcove.com

    So Let's allow all those once again. Huh... another script:

    facebook.com

    So for just the NYT home page, there are 13 scripts hard at work.

    Going through some other pages on the same site, we get typekit.com, stats.com, ticketnetwork.com, insightexpressai.com, buzzfeed.com, doubleclick.net, google-analytics.com, pointroll.com, dl-rms.com, questionmarket.com

    Typekit.com, brightcove.com, and ticketnetwork.com are the only ones not specifically looking you over and tracking and or generating what you see by what you clickk on.

    But just on one website, we have at least 22 scripts designed to follow you around.

    I know a lot of people here use noscript, and this might be old news to them. But newcomers might benefit from what is happening.

    • by TheSeatOfMyPants (2645007) on Monday September 16, 2013 @09:42PM (#44869005) Journal

      For Firefox users, Stanford research discovered recently [stanford.edu] that using a script-blocking extension actually isn't as effective at privacy protection as using privacy & ad-blocking lists with an ad-blocking extension (I use AdBlock Plus). I double-checked the domains you listed, and all of them appeared in at least one of the blocklists, either blocking everything from their sites or blocking things from being executed from another domain.

      If you're in Firefox (and have a *lot* of patience/time), you might like another whitelisting-based extension they labeled extremely effective, though:
      "Request Policy [requestpolicy.com], a Firefox extension, takes the opposite approach: all requests to third-party domains are blocked, save those the user explicitly allows. While Request Policy offers nearly comprehensive protection from third-party tracking, properly configuring it requires substantially greater patience and expertise than the average user can reasonably be expected to possess."

  • The Myspace problem. (Score:5, Interesting)

    by gallondr00nk (868673) on Monday September 16, 2013 @08:44PM (#44868625)

    I wonder occasionally if advertising is the next overinflated bubble fit to burst.

    Companies or investors are buying into these vast userbases (which is essentially what is being sold) on the broad assumption that somehow advertising revenue will return the investment. Yet in almost every case this has proved spurious as the trends are so volatile.

    Tumblr has never made a profit and yet is worth over $1 billion simply because people believe that advertising is worth that much. It seems to be an act of faith in much the same way as people believed that housing was an investment that always grew, or you couldn't lose buying technology stock in the late 90's.

    The foundations of this advertising collossus seem no more secure than those of the financial one, and we all know how well that ended up.

  • Figure out what tax you're willing to pay for "free" stuff. The human brain is good at ignoring ads.
  • Hulu makes me watch 6 30-second commercials several times an hour like normal TV. Haven't done Hulu in a year and a half.

    If tumblr does anything besides the occasional in-line ad as part of the tumbling scroll wall, forcing me to stop and watch, bye bye.

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