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Twitter Technology

Western Australian Sharks Send Tweets To Swimmers 75

Posted by samzenpus
from the check-to-see-if-it's-safe-to-go-back-in-the-water dept.
Zothecula writes "More shark attacks occur in Western Australia than almost anyplace else on Earth. In order to help protect swimmers and surfers, the state government relies largely on helicopter-based spotters, plus members of the public who report their own sightings. Now, however, the Department of Fisheries has introduced a new system, in which the toothy fishes announce their own presence via Twitter. Known as the Shark Monitoring Network, the system utilizes acoustic tags that are attached to the fins of individual sharks, along with buoyed monitoring devices that pick up the signals transmitted by those tags. When a tagged shark swims within range of one of the monitors, its species, size and location is automatically recorded."
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Western Australian Sharks Send Tweets To Swimmers

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  • by enoz (1181117) on Friday January 03, 2014 @12:58AM (#45853829)

    In Australia, there are an average of 1 deaths per year from Shark attacks [taronga.org.au]

    For comparison there are an average of 121 deaths per year from drowning at beaches, harbours and rivers.

    Furthermore in 2010 [abs.gov.au] 217 people died as a result of an assault and 1,503 died as a result of a transport accident (706 car, 236 motorcycle, 227 pedestrian)

    Does that put it in perspective?

  • Re:Wow... (Score:5, Informative)

    by Anonymous Coward on Friday January 03, 2014 @02:51AM (#45854183)

    so is the response from the Western Australian government. The current strategy is a cull of sharks off the coast

    The WA government's response is a deliberate distraction, and a sop to the mouthbreathing bogans that voted them in.They're trying to protect the live sheep export industry from scrutiny.

    “Every year, thousands of dead sheep are thrown overboard as ships depart Australian ports for the Middle East, either whole or minced, without care or consideration for the consequences of these actions,” said Alexia Wellbelove of Humane Society International. “It is highly likely that the disposal of animal remains in this way will attract large sharks over a wide distance. This attraction of large sharks may have dreadful consequences. HSI is concerned that one of these consequences may be increased incident of shark attacks.”

    http://www.hsi.org.au/?catID=1179 [hsi.org.au]

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