Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Businesses Technology Hardware

PC Shipments In 2013 See the Worst Yearly Decline In History 564

Posted by Soulskill
from the what-will-it-stabilize-at? dept.
An anonymous reader writes "The PC market continues to be in free fall, having now seen its seventh consecutive quarter of declining worldwide shipments. Worldwide PC shipments dropped to 82.6 million units in the fourth quarter of 2013, according to Gartner, a 6.9 percent decrease from the same period last year. It's worth emphasizing that this past quarter resulted in a total of 315.9 million units shipped in 2013, a 10 percent decline from 2012, and the worst decline in PC market history. The overall shipment level was equal to the one in 2009."
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

PC Shipments In 2013 See the Worst Yearly Decline In History

Comments Filter:
  • by roc97007 (608802) on Friday January 10, 2014 @04:01PM (#45920789) Journal

    Film at eleven.

    • by alen (225700) on Friday January 10, 2014 @04:03PM (#45920819)

      yep
      i have a 2 year old macbook i'll use for another few years

      • by Penguinisto (415985) on Friday January 10, 2014 @05:11PM (#45921595) Journal

        Macs were the anomaly in all this - their "PC" sales went up 26% over the same time period.

        Ultimate source is Gartner, but found the info here: linky [appleinsider.com]

        Also, if kept reasonably clean, a Mac will last way longer than the typical OEM box/laptop.

        Otherwise, in the PC realm? Yeah... over the past few years, I've just bought laptops as needed, and aside from my last purchase (because the old laptop was failing), that's been farther and fewer between.

        In other news, there is also the Tablet Effect; my wife went from a laptop to an iPad 4 last year, and it seems to suit her perfectly.

        • by jedidiah (1196) on Friday January 10, 2014 @05:37PM (#45921879) Homepage

          > Also, if kept reasonably clean, a Mac will last way longer than the typical OEM box/laptop.

          No it won't. It will become obsolete faster as it's completely unmaintainable. Anything that breaks will be harder to deal with. Obsolete components can't be swapped out.

          With a PC, I can do this myself or pay someone else. This isn't an option with a Mac.

          My old Mac is a doorstop. Can't even get OS updates for it. Similarly old PCs are fine, especially with an upgraded video card.

          • No it won't. It will become obsolete faster as it's completely unmaintainable.

            Assuming the non-geeks even bother to upgrade anything (the vast majority don't, but let's assume for a moment:)

            Software maintenance? I could be running a 2007-era Intel MBP [apple.com] right now and still use the latest OS version, binaries, etc. Let me read that to you in practical terms: I can be using the latest OS/apps on a 7-year-old Apple laptop.

            Hardware Maintenance? Wait, what's the point? For Macs, you usually just slap more RAM and/or a bigger HDD in it, and you're good for another year or three before perfor

        • by Archfeld (6757) * <treboreel@live.com> on Friday January 10, 2014 @05:55PM (#45922051) Journal

          Any cites for that so-called fact. MAC's are closed systems with a much more engineered life span than a clone PC. As stated previously no parts to be swapped any failure is the end of life for a MAC. The anomaly of MAC's upswing could be attributed to the absolute lack of any upgrade path.

        • by gweilo8888 (921799) on Friday January 10, 2014 @06:54PM (#45922511)
          Also, if kept reasonably clean, a Mac will last way longer than the typical OEM box/laptop.

          Is that from the ministry of made-up statistics? Because if so, I'd like to rebut with this, from the ministry of silly ministries -- I have multiple, perfectly-working Windows-based PC machines (both desktop and laptop) that are well over a decade old. In fact, the *only* component failures of any kind that I have had with my machines are hard disks, fans, and keyboards, all of which fail with identical frequency in Macs because they are the exact same components.
    • by UnknowingFool (672806) on Friday January 10, 2014 @04:09PM (#45920893)
      Also people are turning to tablets more often for casual computing rather than getting a 2nd or 3rd computer. And then some people just don't like Win 8.
      • by 0123456 (636235) on Friday January 10, 2014 @04:13PM (#45920931)

        And then some people just don't like Win 8.

        You've actually met someone who does like Window 8?

        Everyone I know who's seen it takes one look, goes 'WTF?' and decides not to buy a new PC after all.

        • by roc97007 (608802) on Friday January 10, 2014 @04:18PM (#45920993) Journal

          > You've actually met someone who does like Window 8?

          I have. Well, wait, he says he does, but he works in Redmond (true story) so it may be a job requirement.

          • by Charliemopps (1157495) on Friday January 10, 2014 @06:05PM (#45922157)

            I went on a trip to Africa a few years back and by shear chance ended up traveling with a Microsoft Salesman. God was that a fun trip... I generally like giving people shit but this was special... ...and when he pulled out his windows phone, and it wouldn't connect... then it crashed... He had to borrow my Android... I just stood there grinning ear to ear every time he had to call home.

      • by roc97007 (608802) on Friday January 10, 2014 @04:15PM (#45920959) Journal

        There is that. It'd be difficult to quantify, but I suspect that there is a significant percentage of people who were going to get another PC, but decided to wait rather than struggle with Win8.

        But I think the overriding factor is that PCs made since, oh, 2007 are fast enough for any but the most demanding needs.

        • by orthancstone (665890) on Friday January 10, 2014 @04:25PM (#45921065)

          It'd be difficult to quantify, but I suspect that there is a significant percentage of people who were going to get another PC, but decided to wait rather than struggle with Win8.

          Doubtful. There's nothing sexy about a laptop, whereas Apple and Google (via Samsung and others) have made tablets the go-to computing device of the moment. Win8 is barely moving the needle on this decision; it is all being decided by form factor.

    • by msobkow (48369) on Friday January 10, 2014 @04:12PM (#45920925) Homepage Journal

      Old PCs are good enough. I'm still on a 3.8 GHz P4 single core running Debian, and it's fast enough for everything I do but running my pet project or doing video encoding, both of which I do on my Core i7 laptop.

      My folks recently had to replace their machine. It's a quad core unit that is such serious overkill for email and surfing it's not even funny. Unless it breaks down, I doubt they'll *ever* have to replace it.

      • by roc97007 (608802) on Friday January 10, 2014 @04:19PM (#45921009) Journal

        Old PCs are good enough. I'm still on a 3.8 GHz P4 single core running Debian, and it's fast enough for everything I do but running my pet project or doing video encoding, both of which I do on my Core i7 laptop.

        My folks recently had to replace their machine. It's a quad core unit that is such serious overkill for email and surfing it's not even funny. Unless it breaks down, I doubt they'll *ever* have to replace it.

        That's kinda the point -- you can't BUY a PC these days that isn't serious overkill for email and surfing.

        • Use a laptop with an AMD E2 or Celeron 847 for a while and you'll change your mind. The CPU is what they cut the hardest for cheap laptops and those laptops range from dog slow to downright excruciating.
          • by washu_k (1628007) on Friday January 10, 2014 @05:49PM (#45921983)
            You do realize that a Celeron 847 is way faster than the GP's P4 3.8 GHz? Don't let the Celeron name fool you, it is still a dual core sandy bridge chip, just clocked low.

            The lowest end AMD E2s might get bested by the P4, but the higher clocked ones would still be a big improvement.

            The bigger problem with most cheap laptops is the slow HD and lack of RAM which would cripple any CPU. Give a Celeron 847 an SSD and 4GB+ and it would be fine for most non CPU intensive or gaming tasks. Much better than the P4 for sure.
        • by Mashiki (184564)

          That's kinda the point -- you can't BUY a PC these days that isn't serious overkill for email and surfing.

          Really, we're at a software block. What exists out there now can be done by existing hardware, and there's nothing pushing it. For your email-surfing example, in the past CPU and GPU time was blocking the quality and did for quite awhile, especially decoding. Remember the days not too long ago where interlaced was the way to go? In gaming, it's the mass-drive towards consoles which are on a serious decline even with the new ones being pumped out. But people are finding that computer 2-4 years old will

    • by hairyfish (1653411) on Friday January 10, 2014 @04:13PM (#45920939)
      That, and that fact that Win8 is an unmitigated disaster. Had Win8 given us a Win7-type interface then I'm sure the slowing PC market wouldn't have slowed quite as quickly.
    • by bhlowe (1803290)
      I upgraded my old ~2007 iMac with a "new" 20" iMac from 2011, spent $600. The only reason for the upgrade (my primary machine is a PC) is that my dad's PPC iMac was approaching 10 years old and definitely needed updating.. But of course, vitalization and cloud servers are also reducing the need to buy new machines.
    • by ackthpt (218170)

      Film at eleven.

      Many people never needed one. PC was overkill when all you wanted to do was social network an check email. A smart phone or tablet does this without all the extra bloat and bother (depending upon service provider or how you purchased your mobile computing device, ymmv)

    • by unixisc (2429386) on Friday January 10, 2014 @04:38PM (#45921243)
      The biggest enemy of the PC industry has been.... (drumroll!) ...PCs
    • by scamper_22 (1073470) on Friday January 10, 2014 @04:47PM (#45921335)

      What is odd though is that this is not an enviable market to be in. People spend all kinds of money on things they don't need or replacing things that work perfectly well.

      Even with something as expensive as cars, many people just want a newer car for the simple reason that it is newer. Their old car works perfectly well. But hey,,, time to buy a new car.

      People spend so much money eating out or on coffee and snacks... yet think twice before spending $1.99 or some app.

      People replace clothes all the time just because they're bored of it.

      Apple has probably been the most visible in its ability to get people to think of the computing market like they do the rest of life.

      I often catch myself thinking about my purchases. I'll be cheap about my computer or worry about spending money on a game that takes so much skill to make (so many programmers, graphic artists, managers...). Then I'll go out and spend $50.00 at a restaurant or blow $50 on a pair of jeans that probably cost $5 to make and rest is all show.

      Current PCs are good enough, but it is sad how poorly we treat the field relative to the rest of life.

      yeah, a PC is just a tool... and that's the problem.
      A cup of coffee is just a cup of coffee.
      A pair of jeans is just clothing.

      Somehow many other fields manage to make it more than that and that keeps the money going.

      • by roc97007 (608802)

        I think it depends on the person. On cars, since the 1980's I've bought lease returns and kept them until the don't run anymore. (I'm on my third.) It's really nice not having car payments. I buy clothes at Costco and keep them until my family starts to complain. For me, eating out is an event, not a daily occurrence. I do drink Starbucks or Dutch Brothers, because they really are better than any food-type drive-thru, but I only order regular black coffee, not any of those inordinately expensive froo

      • by BUL2294 (1081735)
        Yeah, except that many of the things you talk about are "public things you show off"--your car, your clothes, how often you go to Starbucks, a fancy restaurant, movies, golf, etc. Unless you're a student or a road warrior, your computer, even if it's a laptop, probably sits on a desk in some room and never moves. You don't take it out in public--it just sits there doing its thing, and it does it well enough to not need to replace it. Add the fact that most people are now afraid to replace it because they'l
      • by esarjeant (100503)

        It depends how you look at your PC. If it's an "appliance" (fridge, microwave, hot water heater, etc.) ask yourself when was the last time you made an impulse buy to replace one of those? We had to buy a new fridge a few years back when after 10+ years our old one stopped working - it was cheaper to replace it than try to fix it.

        Of course, if you're a fridge enthusiast, you would take it apart and fix it yourself. Most people aren't.

        Same thing with PC's - most people could care less, it's an appliance they

    • Film at eleven.

      Yep, no significant software improvements have been made. No need to get better hardware. Even games aren't moving things along anymore since most big games are just console ports now days.

    • by geoskd (321194)

      That is not the only problem. I fdound myself shopping for a new PC when my hard drive crashed. Walmart had a DELL for $300, which I was prepeared to cough up and buy, but then I noticed it only came with windows 8. If it had been windows 7, I would be $300 poorer, and one more PC sale would have been notched up. Since I would have to go through hoops to get rid of win8 anyways, I decided it was easier to resurrect the dead PC than it was to figure out how to downgrade windows. In the end, I am discovering

  • by therealkevinkretz (1585825) * on Friday January 10, 2014 @04:01PM (#45920797)

    Iron lungs and horseshoes are still way down.

  • by Jimbookis (517778) on Friday January 10, 2014 @04:03PM (#45920815)
    Anything sold in the last 4-5 years with an i3/i5/i7 with over 2GB of RAM and Vista or Win7 is still more than enough for most businesses and individuals. There is no real incentive to replace the whole machine when there are cheap options to upgrade with a few more GB and an SSD to give it a new lease of life.
    • by timeOday (582209)
      Even Core 2 Quad bare CPUs still go for $65-$185 [ebay.com]. I'm still waiting for them to come down before I put another $50 into making my Core 2 duo system viable for another few years.
  • by glennrrr (592457) on Friday January 10, 2014 @04:04PM (#45920823)
    Apple's PC shipments are up 28% in the US. Good for them as a side business.
  • Custom Builds (Score:5, Interesting)

    by Koby77 (992785) on Friday January 10, 2014 @04:04PM (#45920829)
    How many brand PC units were replaced by custom built PCs?
    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by Godkills (1205638)
      Custom built PCs are a niche market. I highly doubt they would have anything near a 10% impact on the entire PC market.
      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by Anonymous Coward

        Why not. It's an exponential market.

        After friends/relatives/neighbors wanted me to work on their pos dell/gateway/emachines/sony.. I talked most of them into building one for their next upgrade instead of going back to shit companys who won't support you anyway unless you pay. alot.

        Most of them went for the custom machine easy. Half the price. Better preformance. No crapware on top. And if i have to 'support' them. I don't want to do it for shitty machines. I built more than a few of them for pe

        • Re:Custom Builds (Score:4, Insightful)

          by Tynin (634655) on Friday January 10, 2014 @05:39PM (#45921903)

          After friends/relatives/neighbors wanted me to work on their pos dell/gateway/emachines/sony.. I talked most of them into building one for their next upgrade instead of going back to shit companys who won't support you anyway unless you pay. alot.

          Most of them went for the custom machine easy. Half the price. Better preformance. No crapware on top. And if i have to 'support' them. I don't want to do it for shitty machines. I built more than a few of them for people too. $50.. an hour of my time picking parts. an hour assembling and installing windows. $25 an hour for something i enjoy doing. Everyones happy and it ends up alot less work and downtime/problems for everyone in the future.

          You sound like me ten year ago. I know everyone is different, but get out while you can. If you get more friends and family coming to you, you'll find more and more things breaking, more problems coming up, with expectations that your weekends are no longer yours. And more often than not, over time, these same friends and family will begin expecting you to just fix it, and may even get rude or cause you issues if you expect much more than a "Thank You! Till next time I my smoking causes my GPU to fail due to the dust gunk that caked over the heatsink causing it to overheat for the last few months". And somehow, again over time, they'll come to blame you for these problems that you should have been able to warn them about or prevent. I still assist close friends with anything I can help them with, because they aren't assholes, but some "friends" and definitely some family will take advantage of you. If you feel the desire to pursue this line of work, find a way to do it professionally, and only deal with customers.

      • Re:Custom Builds (Score:5, Informative)

        by Billly Gates (198444) on Friday January 10, 2014 @04:46PM (#45921319) Journal

        Custom built PCs are a niche market. I highly doubt they would have anything near a 10% impact on the entire PC market.

        Not anymore. Asus mentioned they have sold millions of high end/gaming motherboards as gamers no longer buy Dells and replace the GPU like they did in the old days.

        You can thank crappy PSU's and proprietary tiny cases for this decline as gamers are the only ones who upgrade besides corporations and they only do so every 10 years now when MS decides it needs more money for another OS upgrade.

        • Re:Custom Builds (Score:4, Informative)

          by neuro88 (674248) on Friday January 10, 2014 @05:40PM (#45921917)

          Not anymore. Asus mentioned they have sold millions of high end/gaming motherboards as gamers no longer buy Dells and replace the GPU like they did in the old days.

          You can thank crappy PSU's and proprietary tiny cases for this decline as gamers are the only ones who upgrade besides corporations and they only do so every 10 years now when MS decides it needs more money for another OS upgrade.

          I was about to ask you to back up that claim, but a quick google shows what you're saying as true: http://www.maximumpc.com/gigabyte_asus_wrestle_motherboard_shipment_crown2013 [maximumpc.com]

          The article is a bit dated, but apparently Asus was expecting to ship 22.2 million mid to high end boards in 2013. It's starting to seem custom rigs (particularly for gaming) is hardly a niche. Maybe the market's somewhat smaller than desktop machines, but it's certainly large enough to be considered healthy and is still growing.

    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by DogDude (805747)
      How many brand PC units were replaced by custom built PCs?

      There's very little incentive to create a "custom" PC any more. Very powerful machines can be gotten refurbished for less than $300. My guess would be that custom PC's are less than 1% of the entire PC market.
  • by zippo01 (688802) on Friday January 10, 2014 @04:07PM (#45920865)
    This just isn't news to me. There is a large percentage of people that don't really need a PC todo what they do. play online, email, Social media, shop, pictuers, etc.... Until a few years ago the PC was the only way todo this so, they bought a PC. They bought an item that designed todo work and tweeked for home use, so it was overly complex for most. Along came the smart phone and tablet. Small, portable, works, it's SIMPLE and does everything they want/need it todo. Couple that with the slowing of PC speeds advances and new techknology, it is no wornder PC sales are down. They will continue to go down until they reach their new equilibrium.
    • This just isn't news to me. There is a large percentage of people that don't really need a PC todo what they do. play online, email, Social media, shop, pictuers, etc.... Until a few years ago the PC was the only way todo this so, they bought a PC. They bought an item that designed todo work and tweeked for home use, so it was overly complex for most. Along came the smart phone and tablet. Small, portable, works, it's SIMPLE and does everything they want/need it todo. Couple that with the slowing of PC speeds advances and new techknology, it is no wornder PC sales are down. They will continue to go down until they reach their new equilibrium.

      Not to be snide, but you sure have a lot to say about a 'no news' story.

  • by chispito (1870390)
    I don't think may homes are going PC-less, they're simply realizing they probably only need one or two instead of four. Also, why is Apple excluded from these numbers? They sell PCs that happen to also run OSX in addition to other OSes.
    • by chispito (1870390)
      Just ignore me. I see Apple failed to place worldwide, but shows up on the US numbers.
    • by alen (225700)

      yep
      i remember when multi PC families started popping up. today you only need once per family and the rest are smartphones and tablets
      the PC makers missed the boat

  • my prediction for 2014 to 2016
    apple comes out with a somewhat cheap A7 powered laptop in the $300 to $500 range sort of like a chromebook

    most of the cost of a computer goes to intel and MS. once you trade those out for cheaper parts you can make yourself it fairly easy to make a nice profit

    as long as it has a 500GB hard drive, its enough for close to 90% of the people out there

    • by roc97007 (608802)

      I'm sorry, I'm trying to wrap my brain around "apple" and "cheap" in the same sentence.

  • Window 8 (Score:5, Funny)

    by 0123456 (636235) on Friday January 10, 2014 @04:12PM (#45920915)

    Wasn't Window 8 released about seven quarters ago?

  • by cogeek (2425448) on Friday January 10, 2014 @04:13PM (#45920929)
    This is no shock. They've been proclaiming the death of the PC for 15 years or better and the laptop for the last 5 or so. Tablets are cheap, they perform all of the functions the average user needs (browsing, email) But sit down and try to type a novel on a tablet. Or do any sort of CADD work. Programming, 3D modelling, animation, it's not going to happen on a tablet. And 3-4 years from now when everyone's tablet batteries start failing and people realize they have to throw them away and buy another, we'll see the laptop and PC coming back stronger, but it probably won't ever reach the levels it was once at. Doesn't mean it's going away, just the market balancing itself.
  • Build your own (Score:5, Informative)

    by Sandman1971 (516283) on Friday January 10, 2014 @04:20PM (#45921021) Homepage Journal

    Now I'm only going by my circle of friends, family and acquaintances so this might be a small anomaly but...

    It appears that not only is tablet use displacing having a 2nd or 3rd PC, it is more importantly replacing the laptop (name brand). When buying a desktop, the people in my circle have been moving away from buying the Dells and Compaqs and other name brands and have either been building their owns or buying the local PC shop pre-mades, Numbers that wouldn't show up in these reports.

      As others have mentioned, today's desktop PCs also tend to last longer as they are still very powerful 3-4 years later.

    Mix all of these together and it's no surprise

  • by MindPrison (864299) on Friday January 10, 2014 @04:29PM (#45921123) Journal
    ...and still running just fine. Very little is happening on the PC market (except graphics card wise), I just couldn't justify upgrading to an i7 gaming platform that in Scandinavia cost around 2500$. It only had 16 gig memory, whereas my old one got 8 gig. The only thing I did to my "old" quad core pc, was to add a brand new Nvidia 760GTX, and basically every game ran smooth as ever. Even my 3D design software (which uses GPU rendering anyway) ran fantastic with this upgrade. So yeah, if more people do what I just did (which I suspect they do), there's part of your decline in sales right there - the new computers just aren't innovative enough to justify spending hard earned cash on them.
  • by Jody Bruchon (3404363) on Friday January 10, 2014 @04:31PM (#45921157)
    Everyone will say "no sense replacing what works" and I agree. Let's look at what one would be able to buy now, though, and why people wouldn't buy it.

    On the low end of the price spectrum, you have Chromebooks (yuck, puke, no one sane buys these unless they put Linux on it instead), Celerons, and AMD E2 and A4 processors; none of those are even remotely fast. Moving up in price, you see a lot of AMD APUs and Intel Core i3-M systems. I've owned two fairly new laptops recently, one with an AMD A8-4500M ($400) and one with an Intel Core i7-2630QM ($830). The i7 was disappointing (it's a freaking i7, it should absolutely blaze) and only more so because for tasks that are not heavy in the data processing side of things (i.e. data/video compression, software compilation) the A8 seemed to move much faster than the i7 with identical Windows 7 images. Unfortunately, someone at AMD had the stupid idea of making the L1 instruction caches a pitiful 16KB in size and that makes data-heavy tasks run like dog poo.

    On the higher side of things, you find ridiculous and exotic offerings like the Yoga 2 Pro with a 13.3" LCD that has a 3200x1800 resolution (hint: you can't read anything at all unless you squint) and it comes with a low-performance ULV version of a mobile (read: already low-performance without being ULV) Core i5 and a nice low-performance Intel GPU, and all versions of this insane hardware combination are around the $1000 mark. I also firmly believe that while there is a market for "ultrabooks," the majority of people out there are wasting their money on "convertible laptops" and having touchscreens for Windows 8. It's a neat shiny new feature that ends up only being useful in niche situations and otherwise was no different than wrapping $400 up and chucking it in the rubbish bin.

    Why would anyone buy a new laptop when they are so ridiculous? If you're penny-pinching, you get a machine with tons of RAM, hard drive space, and maybe even USB 3.0, but the CPU is slow beyond belief and the whole system suffers. Dropping a few hundred more bucks might get you into i7 territory but even the i7 up to Sandy Bridge is, in my experience, not much better than equivalent higher-end chips in laptops made four years ago. Why blow $1000 on a really nice new laptop when they're either not much better than what you already own or they're an expensive high-resolution joke of a machine? No thanks; I'll wait until they sweeten the pot some more. (And until the convertibles fad goes to hell.)
  • by Stuntmonkey (557875) on Friday January 10, 2014 @05:33PM (#45921835)

    Unit sales for Apple computers are way up year over year. Likewise unit sales for smart phones, tablets, game consoles -- literally everything with a CPU that doesn't run Windows -- are up year over year.

    This is a Windows problem. People don't get excited by clunky old Windows. They don't buy it because they love it, they buy it when they have to. And increasingly they don't.

  • by morgauxo (974071) on Friday January 10, 2014 @05:49PM (#45921987)

    A lot of people like to say that the Desktop PC is dead or dying. I doubt that but I think the market is going to shrink A LOT in the next 10 years. What people seem to forget is that before the internet most people did not have PCs and yet, there were several companies making a lot of money selling them.

    I think most people in our society have a strong aversion to technology. They don't want to learn about it, they may want something from it (the internet) but they don't want to make ANY effort to learn anything about it in order to get that. It's not that they are unable or even unwilling to learn something, it's specifically technology. They learn other things in absurd detail like sports stats and clebrity trivia.

    People don't want to see technology. They are repulsed by the site of something that looks technical. That's why TVs have to be flatter. You only see the front, the front is a picture of something else, not a TV. Before flat screens the big thing was to hide them inside cabinets with doors that close. People do that to their stereos too. Somehow a overpriced but cheap piece of fiberboard is better to look at than some shiny piece of kit.

    I think what we actually have is a society full of wannabe ludites. They would be ludites except... they can't break themselves of their internet and entertainment habits to become real ludites.

    But, now there are tablets and other small devices. Tablets and phones look more like jewelry and require less actual learning to use. So, the ludite wanabee masses are ditching the PCs they didn't really want to have in the first place and getting their fix from their.

    But, that tech friendly minority of the population that always existed before has not gone extinct. We too will use our tablets and phones where it is appropriate but some things are just better on a bigger device that is not encumbered by the size, energy and weight restrictions of a portable. We will buy Desktops just like we did 15-20 years ago. That is a much smaller market but it was big enough to float large corporations then, it will be big enough now... once the number of competitors is whittled down a bit.

    The sad thing is I think their time with PCs was actually starting to mend people's mass psychosis of tech hatred. Now people will just revert back to their old ways.

  • by technomom (444378) on Friday January 10, 2014 @06:15PM (#45922233)

    We have a couple of aging Windows laptops in our house but they are slowly getting replaced by Chromebooks and tablets. There's just nothing that we run on Windows that absolutely 100% demands Windows. We're using Mint instead of Quicken now, that was the last Windows thing we used. On the Chromebooks, the kids use Google Docs or Microsoft's own cloud based Office when it is absolutely called for. They have yet to hand in an assignment this year where the teacher could tell what source program was used.

    The Windows laptops are used mostly for browsing and there's one that my husband keeps around because his work VPN is on it, but he hasn't used it in so long, he's not entirely sure the password is up to date. We also have one Macbook that gets a little usage.

    Even so, it's much more likely that if we ever buy an actual full on computer, it would more likely be a Macbook Air rather than a Windows PC. Just never warmed up to the Metro look at all. I tried it and it looked ugly and busy to me whereas the Mac look is still familiar and simple.

  • by nurb432 (527695) on Friday January 10, 2014 @07:01PM (#45922571) Homepage Journal

    This just go show several things:

    The market is saturated
    New computers are not that much better than what you have now.
    Most people never wanted a PC but wanted a tablet..
    The economy still sucks..

  • by Marrow (195242) on Friday January 10, 2014 @09:26PM (#45923517)

    Is that still the case now? Seems like the consoles might be siphoning away some of those gamer sales.

He who steps on others to reach the top has good balance.

Working...