Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Technology

Verizon Discontinues Home Automation Service After 2 Years 85

Posted by samzenpus
from the on-your-own dept.
An anonymous reader writes "Verizon has discontinued its Home Monitoring and Control solution, a $10/month service for do-it-yourselfers that enables remote monitoring and control of security, lighting, thermostats and more. The author notes Verizon 'was attempting to become the first successful provider of a DIY security/automation system that had a monthly fee separate from a professionally monitored security system. ... Providers could (and do) charge premiums of $10 or more for automation and self-monitored security as an attachment to professional monitoring, but not as a standalone service.'"
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

Verizon Discontinues Home Automation Service After 2 Years

Comments Filter:
  • DIY, huh? (Score:4, Interesting)

    by JohnFen (1641097) on Monday February 10, 2014 @05:56PM (#46213019)

    If you're paying a third party for a service, it's not DIY.

    I've had DIY home security for almost 20 years now. There's no need to pay for monitoring. When something is worth alerting me about, the system sends me a text ( before that, it paged me).

    • by Nos. (179609)

      I did this for quite a while too. Unfortunately it doesn't qualify for any insurance discounts, so I went with a system that does. The insurance discount is about equal to the monthly bill, and I don't have to worry about any maintenance.

      • by JohnFen (1641097)

        That's legit. I'm a little different... any discount that only offsets the cost of the service isn't a big enough discount to tempt me. I'm one of those weirdos who doesn't trust third parties with my data, so I run my own cloud service, my own email server, etc. specifically to minimize the exposure of my data to unaccountable companies.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    My dog and .40 are the best DIY home security.

    • by Holi (250190)

      For every time a gun is used in self-defense in the home, there are 7 assaults or murders, 11 suicide attempts, and 4 accidents involving guns in or around a home.

      • Let's see: That's 7 that might be prevented by having a gun, 11 most likely N/A (they'll figure out some other way), and 4 that might be due to a gun (or just klutzes that might find some other way to remove themselves from the genepool). 7 - 4.....Sounds like we need more guns...
      • by Belial6 (794905)
        You do realize that those statistics don't count the majority of times that a gun is used for self defense, right? If someone commits assault or murder, the police are virtually always contacted. When someone commits suicide, the authorities are virtually always contacted. When someone shoots themselves on accident, they will generally go to a hospital, and... the authorities are contacted.

        On the other hand, in the vast majority of cases, when a gun is used for self protection in the home, no shots ar
        • by jrumney (197329)

          no shots are fired, and the homeowner does not contact the authorities because they then run the risk of being arrested for protecting themselves

          So let me get this straight. In the US, you have the much lauded right to bear arms, but it only applies if you actually fire a shot?

          • by Belial6 (794905)
            In many places, it is more of a... You only have it if you lock the gun in a safe and never take it out. Especially when there is ammunition in the same room.
          • by Agripa (139780)

            So let me get this straight. In the US, you have the much lauded right to bear arms, but it only applies if you actually fire a shot?

            This happened not to long ago in Kansas where a person legally carrying concealed was convicted of a felony for threatening to use deadly force but not actually using it. Had he shot his attacker, he would have saved himself years of legal work.

        • by Ly4 (2353328)

          ... in the vast majority of cases ... the homeowner does not contact the authorities ...

          Bullshit. State laws on the subject vary massively; there's no way to make a blanket statement like that unless you're in confirmation-bias mode.

      • Re:DIY Security (Score:4, Insightful)

        by epyT-R (613989) on Monday February 10, 2014 @08:11PM (#46213877)

        Did you know that for every car manufactured, at least 95% of them are involved in some kind of crime? From parking and traffic violations to human trafficking and murder, cars are the cornerstone for this EPIDEMIC!! ZOMG!

        Soccer mom fear mongering doesn't make a good argument for (or against) anything.

      • by JWSmythe (446288)

        You do know that statistics like that are complete and total BS.

        If someone were to encourage an intruder to leave quickly (with no shots fired), there is no accountability nor paper trail. Not everything should turn into a complaint to law enforcement. A lot of those potential intruders learn from their mistake.

        If, as another example, the local hoodlums knew someone was well armed, they may choose to avoid trouble with that person. Again, no shots fired. No police reports.

        Some of us have a very safe z

      • by PPH (736903)

        For every time a gun is used in self-defense in the home,

        ... 425 bullshit statistics are quoted by whiny anti gun liberals.

      • For every time a gun is used in self-defense in the home, there are 7 assaults or murders, 11 suicide attempts, and 4 accidents involving guns in or around a home.

        Citation? The lowest number I've seen on defensive gun uses is 64,000 year. That's via a methodology expected to undercount, but even if we assume that it's an overcount and take *half* of it, then defensive gun use is likely to be more than three times as common as homicide via firearm [unreasonable.org].

        Other estimates -- highly controversial ones, to be sure --

    • by Medievalist (16032) on Monday February 10, 2014 @07:10PM (#46213519)

      My dog and .40 are the best DIY home security.

      Yeah, my dog gets pretty crazy after 40 ounces of malt liquor too.

    • by edjs (1043612) on Monday February 10, 2014 @07:16PM (#46213569)

      So, while the dog pisses on the fire, you shoot into the air to summon emergency services?

    • Damn right
  • by Impy the Impiuos Imp (442658) on Monday February 10, 2014 @05:56PM (#46213027) Journal

    "It's just as well," the Verizon spokesperson said, "It wasn't close to turning a profit, and that didn't even count the extra costs feeding the home info from all sensors to the NSA, whom we aren't even legally allowed to charge."

    • by jeffmeden (135043)

      "It's just as well," the Verizon spokesperson said, "It wasn't close to turning a profit, and that didn't even count the extra costs feeding the home info from all sensors to the NSA, whom we aren't even legally allowed to charge."

      Are you kidding? The NSA (and other TLAs) get charged a *crapton* for siphoning data from private orgs: http://www.forbes.com/sites/ro... [forbes.com]

      • by epyT-R (613989)

        Exactly, and the taxpayer foots the bill. we pay for our own oppression.

        • by omnichad (1198475)

          Well...not that this isn't bad, but where else would it come from? Would you prefer that international funds were used? Some foreign nation or agency?

  • If you're paying Verizon to do it, how is it DIY?

    • by Anonymous Coward

      The sensor array is DIY, you pay Verizon to hook up your array to their monitoring service.

      Rather like if you built your own car then payed tolls to drive it on the government's roads.

  • by John3 (85454) <john3@cornells . c om> on Monday February 10, 2014 @06:02PM (#46213061) Homepage Journal
    They pushed the service on every call I made to FIOS tech support or Verizon billing, so they certainly communicated the availability of the service. However, they never really had a shot at making this service fly due to a number of challenges.

    - There just aren't a lot of devices linked yet within a home, especially since Verizon was targeting a novice and not someone who's played with X10 or can configure their own router.

    - Verizon support is terrible for most products, and this would likely have been even worse.

    - Who really needs to control their lighting and thermostats more than they already do. By now anyone with a computer or Verizon Internet service likely has a programmable thermostat, motion sensor outdoor lights, and timers on lamps for when they go on vacation. Is it worth paying a bloated company like Verizon $120 a year to help you manage what you're already handling fine for free?

    The nail in the coffin was probably Google purchasing Nest. And no, I did not RTFA.

  • "In Soviet America, home automation automates--" nah, I got nothing.
    • by bobbied (2522392)

      "In Soviet America, home automation automates--" nah, I got nothing.

      NSA data mining you...

    • by epyT-R (613989)

      "In soviet america, home automation automates you." Sounds about right..

  • ADT stock just plunged 25% recently because they aren't doing well...

    • I'm guessing no one's making any money on home security since at best it's a placebo.

      Being secure means paying attention, not acting like an asshole and just generally not being stupid. Which a bunch of cheap sensors and some noisemakers won't come close to replicating.

      Not to mention that the kind of people/domiciles that could actually use a boost in security probably don't have the disposable income to throw away on some plastic junk.
  • by swschrad (312009) on Monday February 10, 2014 @06:12PM (#46213129) Homepage Journal

    and it hasn't been.

    • by jrumney (197329)

      The problem with any service like this, is it will never meet the profit precedent set by 160 byte SMS messages, so it is always doomed to failure in the eyes of a Telco.

  • MBA "Leadership" (Score:5, Interesting)

    by ltrand (933535) on Monday February 10, 2014 @06:31PM (#46213267)
    You know its funny, these guys once in a while get to a market too early, then because revenue is too weak, decide it isn't promising enough to invest in. Players enter the market (Nest, Google, etc) and it slowly starts to pick up steam. MBA's higher up decide it's been "long enough" so divest themselves of the endeavor. Mark my words, within the next 36 months there will be an explosion in that marketspace, some Verizon executive is going to scream "why didn't we see this" and then they will take 2 years reentering the market they tried to start.

    This is why I laugh at large corporation "innovation".
    • Mark my words, within the next 36 months there will be an explosion in that marketspace

      Indeed. Both Lowe's and Staples [cepro.com] have been farting around with standards-based (zigbee, z-wave and wi-fi) home automation equipment for about a year and it looks like they are ramping up for 2014.

  • There's just too many DIY options out there for self monitoring to make it worth paying somebody else to do what the owner can themselves. But then again there certainly are different needs for different people. For example EyezOn has a module called Envisalink 3 which works with DSC and Honeywell security systems: it makes them accessible via the web and alerts can be sent via text/email to a number of contacts for a number of events. I've had the module for about a year now, picked it up for around $130,
  • That is simply not true. These guys have been offering third party monitoring for DIY home security for over a decade.

    http://www.smarthome.com/alarm... [smarthome.com]

You can do this in a number of ways. IBM chose to do all of them. Why do you find that funny? -- D. Taylor, Computer Science 350

Working...